2015 Chrysler 200 To Add Stop-Start Technology This Fall | Edmunds

2015 Chrysler 200 To Add Stop-Start Technology This Fall


Just the Facts:
  • Chrysler will boost the fuel economy of the redesigned 2015 Chrysler 200 sedan by offering stop-start technology starting this fall.
  • City driving is expected to receive the biggest boost in gasoline savings.
  • The Chrysler 200 is the automaker's second vehicle to offer the technology; Ram was the first.

DETROIT — Chrysler will boost the fuel economy of the redesigned 2015 Chrysler 200 sedan by offering stop-start technology this fall.

"The technology is coming to the Chrysler 200 this September," a Chrysler source told Edmunds. "This is our second application of stop-start. The Ram was first. The technology increases fuel economy and reduces (greenhouse gas) emissions."

 The source did not want to be identified.

The technology shuts off the engine when the vehicle is at idle, such as at a traffic light. The engine is automatically restarted as soon as the driver takes his or her foot off the brake pedal. The system has a battery pack, and uses a modified alternator that generates current and also works as a starter to restart the engine. It is unclear if the technology will be standard or optional.

Other automakers also offer stop-start technology as one of several electrification methods to boost fuel economy and reduce greenhouse gases.

The 2015 Chrysler 200 that recently went on sale is not available with the technology.

The greatest impact is expected to be in city driving. The Chrysler source would not say how much the fuel economy would increase with the technology or whether it would be offered on both engines. The standard 184-horsepower 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine is rated at 23 mpg city/36 mpg highway.

The optional 295 hp 3.6-liter V6 is rated at 19 mpg city/32 mpg highway.

Stop-start technology boosted Ram fuel economy 1 mpg.

However, the fuel economy increase for the 200 likely would be somewhat higher because the vehicle's weight is lighter and it has a smoother aerodynamic shape than the Ram's.

Edmunds says: Chrysler is expected to expand stop-start technology to other vehicles. Last year, the automaker announced on its Web site that it was seeking engineers to help develop electric, hybrid and stop-start technology.

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