X-Small SUVs

Extra-small SUVs are the smallest and least expensive crossovers you can buy, pairing an elevated driving position with excellent maneuverability. Cost-cutting is sometimes apparent, but top-trim versions can feel surprisingly upscale.
2022 Volkswagen Taos
1
Introduced in 2022

Volkswagen Taos

MSRP
$22,995 - $33,045
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 31
2022 Chevrolet Trailblazer
2
Introduced in 2021

Chevrolet Trailblazer

MSRP
$21,600 - $27,200
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 31
2021 Mazda CX-30
3
Introduced in 2020

Mazda CX-30

MSRP
$22,050 - $34,050
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
25 - 28


Small SUVs

Small SUVs are among the hottest vehicles in today's market, thanks to virtues like reasonable pricing, excellent versatility and a just-right size. They've even begun to supplant midsize sedans as a sensible family vehicle.
1
Redesigned in 2017

Honda CR-V

MSRP
$25,750 - $35,550
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
29 - 30
2
Redesigned in 2017

Mazda CX-5

MSRP
$25,370 - $37,505
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 28
3
Redesigned in 2021

Nissan Rogue

MSRP
$26,050 - $37,230
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 30

Small 3-row SUVs

If you need a lot of seats on a tight budget, a small three-row SUV might be a good fit. The third row will be cramped for anyone larger than a child, and there's not much cargo room with the third row deployed, but it's nice to have the option.
1
Redesigned in 2021

Kia Sorento

MSRP
$29,390 - $42,590
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 26
2
Redesigned in 2022

Mitsubishi Outlander

MSRP
$25,795 - $35,345
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 27
3
Redesigned in 2018

Volkswagen Tiguan

MSRP
$25,245 - $39,095
Edmunds Rating
7.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 25

Midsize SUVs

For growing families or frequent road trippers, midsize SUVs make a lot of sense. They have a larger back seat and more cargo room than their smaller siblings, while some models offer off-road variants for buyers in search of something different.
1
Redesigned in 2019

Honda Passport

MSRP
$32,790 - $44,180
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 22
2
MSRP
$30,855 - $50,025
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
19 - 22
3
Redesigned in 2021

Toyota Venza

MSRP
$32,670 - $40,000
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
Combined MPG
39

Midsize 3-row SUVs

Midsize three-row SUVs provide lots of utility at a reasonable price. Expect advanced safety features, too, along with capable acceleration when you need it.
1
Top Rated vehicle
Introduced in 2020

Kia Telluride

MSRP
$32,790 - $44,590
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 23
2
Introduced in 2020

Hyundai Palisade

MSRP
$33,150 - $48,390
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 22
3
Redesigned in 2016

Honda Pilot

MSRP
$39,060 - $50,620
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
22 - 23

Large SUVs

Large SUVs are classic utility vehicles. These truck-based workhorses can tow a boat and transport a family of eight at the same time. Fuel economy is predictably forgettable, but if maximum versatility is what you need, these big rigs deliver.
1
Redesigned in 2021

Chevrolet Suburban

MSRP
$50,700 - $75,300
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 18
1
Redesigned in 2021

GMC Yukon

MSRP
$51,000 - $71,600
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 18
3
Redesigned in 2018

Ford Expedition

MSRP
$49,625 - $79,425
Edmunds Rating
7.5 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 20


X-Small luxury SUVs

Extra-small luxury SUVs offer a prestigious badge at an affordable price. They don't always deliver luxury-grade comfort and performance, but a few gems stand out.
1
Introduced in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLB-Class

MSRP
$38,050 - $49,500
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 26
2
Redesigned in 2016

BMW X1

MSRP
$35,400 - $37,400
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 27
3
Redesigned in 2021

Mercedes-Benz GLA-Class

MSRP
$36,230 - $54,500
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 28

Small luxury SUVs

Small luxury SUVs cost more than their extra-small counterparts, but the adage about getting what you pay for is true. These crossovers typically offer a more comfortable ride, nicer materials and better performance, as well as a larger cabin, of course.
1
Introduced in 2016

Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class

MSRP
$43,200 - $73,900
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 25
2
Redesigned in 2018

Volvo XC60

MSRP
$41,700 - $69,500
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 27
3
Redesigned in 2019

Acura RDX

MSRP
$38,400 - $51,000
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 24

Midsize luxury SUVs

Midsize luxury SUVs generally provide stout performance, the latest in luxury options and lots of space for passengers and cargo. Also included here is a new sub-class of SUV "coupes," which sacrifice practicality for style.
1
Top Rated vehicle
Redesigned in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class

MSRP
$54,750 - $113,950
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 23
2
MSRP
$76,500 - $116,000
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 20
2
Redesigned in 2019

Porsche Cayenne

MSRP
$67,500 - $163,200
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 20

Midsize 3-row luxury SUVs

Midsize luxury three-row SUVs typically offer seating for seven, or six if you spring for second-row captain's chairs. Make sure to bring the family along for the test drive; it's not unusual to find that the third row is tight for taller children or adults.
1
Redesigned in 2017

Audi Q7

MSRP
$54,950 - $72,000
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
20 - 21
2
Redesigned in 2022

Acura MDX

MSRP
$47,200 - $60,950
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 22
3
Redesigned in 2020

Lincoln Aviator

MSRP
$51,465 - $87,905
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
Combined MPG
20 - 23

Large luxury SUVs

In terms of road presence, there's nothing quite like a large luxury SUV. With plenty of seating and strong towing abilities, these behemoths are as functional as they are impressive. Not many other vehicles offer quilted leather upholstery along with underbody protection for serious off-roading.
1
Redesigned in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class

MSRP
$76,000 - $132,100
Edmunds Rating
8.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 21
2
Redesigned in 2018

Lincoln Navigator

MSRP
$76,705 - $101,855
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 18
3
Redesigned in 2021

Cadillac Escalade

MSRP
$76,195 - $102,995
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 17

Super luxury SUVs

Planning to star in a music video? You've come to the right place. Superlux SUVs are the fanciest of the fancy. They're designed for shoppers who demand the best, no matter the price.
1
Introduced in 2021

Mercedes-Benz Maybach GLS

MSRP
$160,500
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
16
2
MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available
3
Redesigned in 2019

Mercedes-Benz G-Class

MSRP
$131,750 - $156,450
Edmunds Rating
7.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
14 - 18

Small performance SUVs

Don't let the word "small" throw you off. Compact performance SUVs are among the most capable all-around performers on the planet, pairing major driving thrills with plenty of SUV versatility.
1
Introduced in 2017

Mercedes-Benz AMG GLC 63 S

MSRP
$84,100
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
18
2
Introduced in 2020

Tesla Model Y Performance

MSRP
$53,990 - $60,990
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
111 - 125
3
Introduced in 2020

BMW X3 M

MSRP
$69,900
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
16

Midsize performance SUVs

If you need a lot of space but want sports-car acceleration and handling, too, a midsize performance SUV could be just the ticket. These steroidal SUVs boast incredible power and athleticism, yet they also deliver wagon-like practicality.
1
Introduced in 2019

Lamborghini Urus

MSRP
$218,009
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
14
2
Introduced in 2020

Audi SQ7

MSRP
$85,000 - $91,200
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
17
3
Introduced in 2020

Audi SQ8

MSRP
$89,100 - $95,000
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
17


Large performance SUVs

The laws of physics technically still apply to these high-horsepower family haulers, but that may be hard to believe when you're hurtling along inside one. Want your family to experience maximum driving excitement along with the usual luxury? These SUVs should hit the spot.
Not enough vehicles yet to rank
Introduced in 2021

BMW ALPINA XB7

MSRP
$141,300
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
17


Edmunds' experts test 200 vehicles per year on our test track. We also test them using a 115-mile real-world test loop of city streets, freeways and winding canyons. The data we gather results in our ratings. They’re based on 30-plus scores that cover performance, comfort, interior, technology, utility and value.


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Browse other types

Top Selling SUVs of
2016

Vehicles included in the data set are exclusively retail registrations to individuals and do not include rental sales or registrations from government bodies*

  1. Jeep
    734,539
  2. Toyota
    633,653
  3. Ford
    559,891
  4. Honda
    539,869
  5. Subaru
    458,228
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20162020
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Video reviews

CARLOS LAGO: Hey. Carlos Lago and Alistair Weaver here with Edmunds. And we finally have a set of wheels for our fan favorite, Sir Baron Von Bronco. Alistair. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Thank you, sir. That's right. At long last, we have the much, much, much delayed Ford Bronco and the Land Rover Defender too, iconic names from the world of off-roading. And at long last, we're going to compare them. CARLOS LAGO: Not only that, but we've actually have these two door SUVs configured in ways that makes them really comparable. So we get to find out how they perform off road, what they're like to drive in, ultimately which one you should buy. ALISTAIR WEAVER: But before we get into all of that, be sure to like and subscribe. And click that little bell thing. And if you're looking to sell your car and buy one of these in a hot, hot market, go to edmunds.com/sellmycar. And we'll make you a cash offer. Now let's get on with it. CARLOS LAGO: If you're wondering where the Wrangler is, get in line. Last year, we compared the then new Defender against the Toyota 4Runner and Jeep Wrangler. But the biggest problem with that comparison was the Bronco sized hole in the lineup. Now we can address that question. Which of these two is better overall? Now you can get the Bronco with a locking front differential and 35 inch tall tires. Never mind they're actually 34.4 inches. But I digress. And that all comes in the Sasquatch off road package. That package is overkill for this comparison. So we decided to get the Outer Banks. Now this is the more on road focused Bronco. In fact, it's the only Bronco that comes with 18 inch wheels. And that's the largest wheel that you can get on a Bronco. And it's so fancy, it even has painted wheel arches. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Luxury. CARLOS LAGO: Very. This Bronco has also been equipped with the turbo V6 and 10 speed automatic. It has a locking rear differential and 32 inch tall tires. ALISTAIR WEAVER: You done? CARLOS LAGO: Are you? ALISTAIR WEAVER: I am. CARLOS LAGO: OK. ALISTAIR WEAVER: My Instagram is updated. CARLOS LAGO: I will continue the shoot. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Sorry, Instagram. I'm not good with words. Anyway, this is the Defender 91st edition. And like the Ford, it also has a turbocharged six cylinder engine. But it only has an eight speed gearbox, not a 10. Having said that, it does have more power, up to 80 horsepower more than the Ford, depending on what fuel you put into it. That's 395 ponies. The model we have here has 20 inch wheel rims. But it doesn't have the optional locking rear differential. It does, though, have chunky all-terrain tires that even say adventure on them. And it has a locking center differential that equally distributes the power front to rear and helps you in the rough stuff. Let's talk pricing. Has 66 and 1/2 thousand dollars, it's about $15,000 more than this Bronco. And trim for trim, the Land Rover is always a few thousand dollars more than the Ford. So it starts on the back foot despite that power advantage. [MUSIC PLAYING] CARLOS LAGO: Hey, welcome to the interior of the Bronco. Now when you hop in here, it's immediately obvious that this vehicle costs less than the Defender. You know it just by touching and feeling a lot of the hard plastic around the dash. That's one of the reasons why this vehicle costs a lot less. Now on the other hand, you can take the roof off and you can take the doors off. And there's no other SUV out there except for the Jeep Wrangler that allows you to do that. So there's certainly a lot more fun to be had in this interior setup. I'm no design expert though. I don't know if this blue matches this brown. Probably wouldn't be the way that I'd order my Bronco. But hey, I didn't order this one. So don't blame me. Now this Outer Banks has also been equipped with the larger of the available infotainment screens. This screen looks really nice, it's super responsive. And all the physical controls beneath it are large and easy to read. And they're actual buttons that you can touch with your finger. And that makes them easy to use, especially some of these bigger, larger ones. That would be easy to manipulate when you have gloves on. The last thing, and it's a really small complaint, is this gauge cluster. I like the fact that there's a big digital display. That's really nice. But I wish there was an analog tachometer instead of an analog speedometer. Because I want to reference the TAC more quickly instead of the speed. And I already have a digital speedo. So why have it twice? Either way though, this is a functional interior that you could have a lot of fun experiencing. The big downside of the Bronco's back seat isn't the space. The space is actually pretty accommodating if you're an average size adult like myself. The biggest disappointment is the lack of rear vents. That's unfortunate. But the Bronco's advantage over the Defender has to do with how these rear seats fold. It's very simple. That's much nicer than what happens in the Defender. And also the way this is configured gives you more options, depending on how many people you want to sit back here. If you've got three occupants and a bunch of cargo, you can still make this work, which you can't do in the Defender as easily. ALISTAIR WEAVER: The Defender might be the alpha male of the Land Rover range. But inside, it definitely feels more metropolitan than the Bronco, more wine bar than dive bar. You get the feeling that it's really above the Ford's frivolity. The doors don't come off. I mean, how unseemly? And you open the roof with a button, not a bunch of clips. But and maybe they say something about me. I like it. It is more expensive, but it feels more expensive. The materials are a higher quality. This command screen is more sophisticated. And pretentious point, the fonts don't look like a child of the 1980s. You also get this so-called jump seat, which means that you can sit three abreast in the front. Now that sounds great on paper. But in reality, anybody sitting there is just going to get jabbed in the ribs by my elbows. Honestly, it's not even room for a flight attendant. Much better, just to fold it down and use it as an armrest. Getting into the back requires plenty of dexterity and no little patience. This seat is electric. And as you can see, it's pitifully slow. Glad there's no fire. Still with me? And then you sort of scramble in. It's a good test for the thighs. Once you've finally made it back here, there's actually plenty of room. This front seat set up for Carlos as a control, and there's a lot more room than you find in the Bronco. Plenty of leg and head space. But there is a trade off. The Defender 90's trunk space is actually pretty pitiful if the rear seats are up. There's about 7 cubic feet less than you'd find in the Bronco. CARLOS LAGO: Hey, elephant in the room alert. We're kind of in a pickle about how we talk about the Ford Bronco as it relates to build quality. Because Ford is having a lot of trouble actually building them. The main issue right now has to do with the hardtop roof. And it's to the point that Ford is actually going to replace the hardtop roof on all Broncos, even if you've already taken delivery of it. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Now Edmunds actually ordered the Bronco kind of over a year ago with a view that it would be delivered in December 2020. Then it got delayed by the pandemic. Then he got delayed by the chip shortages, then with the 2.7 liter engine, which they couldn't build, but they could the 2.3. Then the roof, I think, we changed the roof three times. I can't even remember what roof we're getting. But finally, it's going to be built in November for delivery in December exactly one year late. CARLOS LAGO: We say all this because if you're considering putting an order in on a Bronco that has a hardtop, we suggest that you wait until Ford has solved this issue if they even let you put the order in in the first place. But Ford isn't alone. Let's talk about the Defender. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Which is being a paragon of reliability. CARLOS LAGO: That's not true in the slightest. ALISTAIR WEAVER: We do know that there's issues with the touchscreen infotainment system. And with this Defender, they have to, have to, have to get it right, Carlos. CARLOS LAGO: Yes. And with that in mind, let's go into the desert and do some off-roading. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Well, there's no cell phone coverage. CARLOS LAGO: Yes. [MUSIC PLAYING] Did I make it? Now longtime viewers will surely be familiar with our famous industry standard ziggurat of integrity test. As you can tell, this is not our normal ziggurat because the park that we do that at is closed due to fire hazards. Beside the point. The purpose of this test is not to replicate a laboratory articulation test. That's a process that involves specific measurements and math, which I'm not very great at. What we want to do here is climb an off-road SUV up an incline that you might find when you're out adventuring. So in this case, we've found this sort of rock wall. What we want to do here is see what happens when you try to climb up the hill as far as you can. How much does this tire come off the ground? How far can you drive up? And so on and so forth. In this case, the rear tire of the Broncos come up by about an Arnie and a half worth of iPhone 11 Pro, which doesn't mean anything until we get the Defender up here. I'll call out, though, that the Bronco is available with a disconnecting anti-roll bar on the Badlands trim level. And what that is is an anti-roll bar, to back up a little bit, is a bar that mechanically connects the left and right wheels, traditionally front and rear, on any given vehicle. What the disconnecting anti-roll bar does is mechanically disconnects that bar from the front wheels. And that can give the Bronco more articulation, presumably allowing that tire to remain on the ground on inclines like this to make sure it can keep delivering traction to help you drive over these kind of inclines. Doesn't really matter here because this Bronco doesn't have that feature. And next, we're going to get the Defender up here to see how far it can go up, and how much tire it picks up off the ground. If I can climb back in now. Cool, you're good. ALISTAIR WEAVER: A little bit of throttle. Stop. A little bit of throttle. CARLOS LAGO: I'll holler if you go off the edge. ALISTAIR WEAVER: OK, good. Gentle throttle control. Stop. CARLOS LAGO: That's pretty impressive because you're basically at the same level as the Bronco. So we measured Bronco right here. And your center line's about the same. And so we're basically almost out of ramp. So you're able to climb to the same height. So that's great. You're four low center diff locked? ALISTAIR WEAVER: We're four low center diff lock in rock roll mode, with obviously the air suspension, which is a big difference on this car lifted up, which also looks kind of cool. CARLOS LAGO: So I came up with the rear diff locked in four low. So I never decided to challenge the diff. But I need to measure how many Arnies are underneath that tire. For dramatic pause, I've left my phone in the Bronco. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Splendid. I shall wait with bated breath. CARLOS LAGO: Maybe an Arnie and a half, maybe a little bit more than the Bronco. But for a Defender, that's pretty strong versus the Bronco. It's a pretty good performance. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Yeah, I mean every time we've tested this, it's been good off road though. CARLOS LAGO: For sure. But yeah, that's a great performance from both of these, starting out essentially equal from this highly scientific test. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Do you know though? You know what we normally call this at the other place, the ziggurat of integrity? Do you know what this is? CARLOS LAGO: What is this? ALISTAIR WEAVER: The "ziggurock" of integrity. [MUSIC PLAYING] CARLOS LAGO: Among the Bronco's many off road tech features is my personal favorite, the trail turn assist. Now what it does is selectively applies brakes to the inside rear tire while you're turning off road to help tighten that turn. But better than explaining it is actually seeing it in action. So Alistair. ALISTAIR WEAVER: I've actually been wanting to try this feature since the Bronco was announced. It's almost like a modern interpretation of a kind of high school E brake or handbrake. CARLOS LAGO: The sideways lever. ALISTAIR WEAVER: The bit that you could never get right. CARLOS LAGO: Yeah. ALISTAIR WEAVER: OK, let's give it a whirl. I get to drive. Here we go. And as you can see-- that's so cool. I'm sorry. That is so cool. CARLOS LAGO: Isn't that great? Yeah, because it just anchors that tire. And that becomes a point that you pivot around. ALISTAIR WEAVER: And presumably, if you didn't care about your tires, it'd still work on tarmac. CARLOS LAGO: If you wanted the flat spot your tires, yes. But it basically means you never have to 3 point turn off road. ALISTAIR WEAVER: That's very cool. I need another go. CARLOS LAGO: You could do this all day, right? ALISTAIR WEAVER: Yeah. Do it till the tire blows. [MUSIC PLAYING] CARLOS LAGO: Don't go so fast. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Oh no. Oh [BLEEPS]. Poor baron. CARLOS LAGO: No. Why? ALISTAIR WEAVER: He's OK. He's OK. CARLOS LAGO: When driving the Bronco off road, there are a number of things that will be familiar to off-road aficionados and a number of tools that will be great use to off road rookies. Now because we have the V6, we have actually more drive train configuration options. When you hop on this thing, you will see drive modes like you would expect from a four wheel drive. You have two high, you have four high, you have four low to access low range, much like you would expect. But this also has a four auto which is kind of like an all wheel drive or full time four wheel drive mode. And that's only available with this V6. That's a lot of buttons to hit down here if you don't know what you're doing. If you do know what you're doing, you know exactly what to do. But what happens if you don't? Well for that reason, Ford has a number of drive modes. They call them GOAT modes. And that stands for Goes Over Any Terrain, which is cute, very cute. But you turn that dial to select the terrain that you're on like mud or sand and in some Broncos rock crawling and so on. And by turning into those modes, the Bronco will automatically activate the drive setting that you should be in. And it will actually activate the diff locks, whether you have the optional front in the rear to make sure that you're suited to tackle the terrain that you're driving on. It's beneficial because if you're a rookie, you can just turn the dial to the terrain that you plan on heading on. And the Bronco sorts out the right mode, even going into four low should it be appropriate. If you do know what you're doing, you can just forget all that and put the settings-- activate the settings that you want to have when you're driving in a particular environment that you're driving in. That's great. I also like the fact that when you hit the switches to activate drive modes in this, whether it's the rear diff lock, whether it's the trail turn assist, whether it's four auto or four high, there's no delay. You don't have to wait for the computers to figure everything out. They just start changing. They just start adapting. In fact, the diff lock in here is so quick when it turns on. It's kind of-- I almost kind of don't suspect it. You hit the button, the light comes on, and that's it. There's no waiting. That's really nice. The rest of the Bronco is super, super smart and super well done. I also like the Bronco overall a whole lot. This is smart because it delivers a ton of off road capability for those who really want it. But it also doesn't have the sacrifices that come with other super off road capable vehicles, like I don't know, the Jeep Wrangler. I know that we're not comparing the Wrangler here. I can't help but think about the Wrangler in relation to the Bronco and the Defender. Because this kind of bridges the gap between the two. It has some of on road refinement that you would expect to find from the Defender and none of the compromises from the Wrangler. Really, really good stuff. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Like the Bronco, the Defender can be tuned to meet your off-road aspirations. This vehicle actually has less off road hardware than the four door we tested last year. But then all things are relative. You still get air suspension, which certainly helps with the ground clearance. There's a low ratio gearbox. And an iteration of Land Rover's terrain response systems. By using a little button on here. You can actually tell the car what kind of terrain you're on. So mud and rut, sand, wading, that sort of thing. And that impacts things like the throttle response and stability control to help you through the given terrain. And it certainly helps. It makes off-roading that much easier. There's also a plethora of cameras. So it takes the guesswork out of the terrain in front of your nose. The only thing that I do miss on this particular vehicle is paddle controls for the gearbox, particularly if you're on steep descents. I like that extra level of control from the engine braking. But alongside all the off road chops, Land Rover's also worked really, really hard to improve the defender's on road credentials. I did literally thousands of miles in the original Defender. And every one was painful. This is very different. Even compared to a modern car like the Bronco, the steering is much more precise, the ride quality is much better, and it is so much more refined. The journey to location this morning was about 2 and 1/2 hours long. And there's no question that I was happier in the Defender than I would have been in the Ford. CARLOS LAGO: Welcome high up to our hillside hairy hairpin test, semi-official, not official at all test. We found an obstacle here on this trail that has a big dip right here that we're going to put these vehicles through in the worst possible line to see how their clearances stack up when against each other. Stage two of the obstacle is the titular hairpin around the bend here. It's a very tight uphill corner that ends into a narrowing passage. And the trick there is to determine basically can the vehicle make it through? How easily can the vehicle make it through? And what tools does the vehicle have to make it through these obstacles? Alistair's up first with the Defender. Bring it on through. ALISTAIR WEAVER: OK, just to talk you through what I've done, we're into rock roll mode low ratio. Obviously, that's locked the center differential, which basically manages so you have equal power going to the front and rear axle. We're now taking it pretty steady. We're in drive. It's a kind of nice Sunday afternoon drive. Beautiful view. CARLOS LAGO: Defender's now approaching the hairiest part of the hairpin. Good day, sir. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Good day to you, sir. CARLOS LAGO: Beautiful day. Hot day. So, oh, he's picked up the front driver wheel about an Arnie I'd say off the ground. Now about two Arnies. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Is that the 6 foot Arnie? CARLOS LAGO: Wheel is about squashed. But what's nice is you see back here, he's still got plenty of clearance for the-- ALISTAIR WEAVER: I can pull forward for the dramatic effect. CARLOS LAGO: Dramatic effect. I'm trying to explain to the viewers what the vehicle is doing. So it's going to be tricky right here when he drops down is avoiding scraping this bumper as he keeps going. Let's see if that can happen. Are you in four low or four high? ALISTAIR WEAVER: I'm in four high, all the systems off, just relying on talent. CARLOS LAGO: Yeah, as always. As per usual. So your front driver tire's off the ground. And you're going to avoid scraping here. Close. Those side sidewalls are pretty slim. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Yeah, but they look cool. What is nice is the throttle control. You've got a very long throttle at the moment. So I'm able to modulate it very easily and very carefully. CARLOS LAGO: Remember, there's a massive cliff over here. ALISTAIR WEAVER: It's pretty impressive. I mean, I know you think this car isn't kind of like macho and alpha enough for you. And I agree that in Birmingham, the UK, this car looks really alpha. Birmingham, Alabama, less so. But as you can see, it's actually very good at doing what it does. CARLOS LAGO: It's getting through a lot without having a locking rear diff. That's fairly impressive. And 20s. But let's see how it does the hairpin here. [MUSIC PLAYING] So the tricky part about this part of the test is this is pretty straight sheer edge right here. So he's got to come around wide but also avoid the rocks over here from scraping those beautiful 20 inch wheels that of course you want on your off-roader. Bring it on through. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Take a slightly wider line. CARLOS LAGO: Also, this might be a three point turn. Climbing it with no issue. But a little wide it looks like. ALISTAIR WEAVER: That might be the driver. I'm out. CARLOS LAGO: Oh. So what's happening is your tire, you've got kind of a step that your rear tire is on. And what happened right there is the tire's compressing on the rock. And it's acting as a brake and sort of pivoting the car. ALISTAIR WEAVER: I could feel that. CARLOS LAGO: Yeah. Yeah. Around. But man, you don't have a lot of sidewall. That's giving me the heebie-jeebies. ALISTAIR WEAVER: All I can see is a finger. I'm actually driving more on the cameras and on the screen than on what I can see out the windscreen. CARLOS LAGO: Yeah. ALISTAIR WEAVER: OK, here we go. CARLOS LAGO: So he'll climb that. OK, he's up the shelf. And then how much space he has on that driver's side. So because we've got a bit wide, we're going to three point turn this. ALISTAIR WEAVER: I think that's my fault though. I think I went, I tried to open the corner up. CARLOS LAGO: Yeah, now you can straighten out. Now you should be OK. Let's keep moving forward. You're good to go. You're straight all the way through. Maybe right a little bit. Yeah, you're good. It's fun seeing that tire just lock. Because so it's cool seeing that tire lock. This doesn't have a rear diff. So it is doing a little bit of brake application to try to manage that traction a little bit. So that's neat. That's neat to see. ALISTAIR WEAVER: What's also impressive is this is kind of like a one pedal car. Because now even if I'm off the brakes, it effectively uses the engine brake. And I think it's applying a bit of ABS as well just to manage the speed downhill. CARLOS LAGO: Yeah, your crawl ratio is a little bit like a touch higher than that Bronco. So you'd have the gearing advantage to help slow you down. When you were going downhill, this wheel was coming off the ground. And it was stopped. So it was not receiving-- whether they were applying brakes to kind of simulate having that diff could be helping give you that traction. But that's pretty impressive. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Because you can get a Defender with a locking rear diff. It's just that this very car doesn't have it. CARLOS LAGO: But it's getting through a lot without it. That's really impressive. ALISTAIR WEAVER: But what I like as well is how maneuverable and how controllable it is, both in terms of for something with 400 horsepower nearly with it. Throttle input is really easy. Braking input's really easy, particularly when you go into things like rock crawl, it just it does what it says on the tip. CARLOS LAGO: Yeah. ALISTAIR WEAVER: It's good. CARLOS LAGO: So Alistair did this in four low. I'm going to try to do it in four high. Because it's a Bronco. And damn it, it should be able to do this because this is really just a test of articulation and clearance and traction. ALISTAIR WEAVER: He hasn't got air suspension of course. This is just a passive set up. Similar front and rear overhangs. Does look quite cool. You're lifting your front left tire now. Oh, he's lost a bit of traction. CARLOS LAGO: Get some wheel out of it. ALISTAIR WEAVER: He's got a bit of-- here we go. CARLOS LAGO: You know what? ALISTAIR WEAVER: Still fighting for traction. CARLOS LAGO: I'm going to turn on my one pedal drive. I'm trying to do this in four high. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Yeah. CARLOS LAGO: Because I feel like a Bronco should be able to do this in four high. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Because you can. CARLOS LAGO: Yeah. I will not be a slave to limitations of the Earth I guess. I don't know. ALISTAIR WEAVER: There you go. CARLOS LAGO: All right. I'm going to try to maneuver around the hairpin now, the hairy hairpin. ALISTAIR WEAVER: The hairy hairpin. Are you using your, what's it called? CARLOS LAGO: So right now I'm using one pedal drive to give me some smoothness. But I think I'm going to use the trail turn assist to make this turn a bit more smoothly. ALISTAIR WEAVER: So this will be the big test of his fancy turning trail thing. You can see it's already starting to lock the rear tire. But so it's actually effectively dragging its way around the corner, pivoting on the left rear tire and dragging its way around. CARLOS LAGO: Turned off trail turn. Now I got the diff locked. Because I got the position I want. Now-- ALISTAIR WEAVER: So you've got the rear diff locked? CARLOS LAGO: I've got the rear diff-- ALISTAIR WEAVER: And the center? CARLOS LAGO: No. ALISTAIR WEAVER: This doesn't have a center. CARLOS LAGO: This doesn't have a center. It's four wheel drive. Yeah. ALISTAIR WEAVER: The other thing you've got, which I know these aren't on every Bronco, your sidesteps are pretty vulnerable. CARLOS LAGO: Yeah. It's that Outer Banks, this being the most on road one. It's going to have those hanging low. SPEAKER 1: How are we doing [INAUDIBLE] ALISTAIR WEAVER: It's like a good challenge. I have my 21 inch rims or 20 inch rims. CARLOS LAGO: I get the sidesteps. ALISTAIR WEAVER: You have the sidesteps. Can't make it too easy. CARLOS LAGO: Sidesteps are more sacrificial I think. ALISTAIR WEAVER: 20 inch rims look cooler. CARLOS LAGO: This is true. ALISTAIR WEAVER: What's good is both these vehicles are really controllable with all the trick electronics, the way they adjust the throttle now. You can really inch them forwards in a way that 10, 20 years ago would have been unthinkable. CARLOS LAGO: Oh, I'm going to keep turning. And we're through. We're through. SPEAKER 1: Straight out. You're good. CARLOS LAGO: Straighten out. And one pedal drive is off. And that's that. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Boom. Easy. On with the next. You've got anything more aggressive, Mr. Producer? Away from the rough stuff, you might expect the Defender's road focus setup and extra power to win the day. But it's closer than you might think. At our test track, the Land Rover recorded zero to 60 in 6.2 seconds, just half a second faster than the Ford. It's the same gap at the quarter mile. And that's because the Brit is a bit of a fat boy. On our scales, the Defender was an astonishing 553 pounds heavier than the Bronco. That's like carrying around Tyson Fury, Deontay Wilder, and their gym kit all the time. Not surprisingly, this also has an impact on fuel consumption. CARLOS LAGO: Now it's time for everybody's favorite topic, fuel economy. ALISTAIR WEAVER: And the reality is they're both abysmal. CARLOS LAGO: Yes. ALISTAIR WEAVER: These are big, heavy off-roaders. And pretty much whatever you do, however you drive them, you can't beat the teens. CARLOS LAGO: Goes for real life too kids. Enjoy it while it lasts. Let's though talk about how these two drive on road. Starting with the Defender specifically, it's a costlier vehicle compared to the Bronco. But that difference shows up as soon as you hop in the cabin and as soon as you drive down the road. ALISTAIR WEAVER: This really is the only vehicle here that you'd really want a road trip. It's more like an SUV with epic off road chops than a sort of true off-roader of the old school. CARLOS LAGO: And while we're talking about off road capability, the Defender continually impresses me with what it can do on the trail. Because when you look at the specs, it doesn't quite measure up to the Bronco. But I think that may have to do with my perception of how the Defender looks. It just is kind of soft. ALISTAIR WEAVER: It is kind of soft, particularly when you park it next to the new Bronco. Strange, I was driving up here this morning thinking about this. I owned an original Defender. My dad had an early Land Rover before they even called Defender. You know what? I think the Bronco is actually the real successor to the original Defender. It's cool, it's utilitarian, it's massively capable off road. And yet today, it's full of modern accouterments. So the real new Defender is not the Defender. It's actually the Bronco. CARLOS LAGO: The Bronco's fun too. It's got a sense of charm and character that makes it really fun to drive. I think the Defender is the one to get if you want that luxurious like experience with some off-road capability with surprising off road capability. But for me, the Bronco is the one to get. ALISTAIR WEAVER: I think Ford's done an amazing job with this vehicle. Above all else, it's just got this incredible sense of fun. CARLOS LAGO: An incredible sense of fun. ALISTAIR WEAVER: Fun. CARLOS LAGO: Hey. If you enjoyed watching this video, let us know in the comments below. And if you didn't, tell us why. Like, comment, and subscribe. And check out edmunds.com/sellmycar to get an instant cash offer on the car you want to sell. ALISTAIR WEAVER: And go easy on the xenophobia. [MUSIC PLAYING]

Ford Bronco vs. Land Rover Defender | 2-Door Off-Road SUV Showdown | Overlanding Comparison

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