Best SUVs


X-Small SUVs

Extra-small SUVs are the smallest and least expensive crossovers you can buy, pairing an elevated driving position with excellent maneuverability. Cost-cutting is sometimes apparent, but top-trim versions can feel surprisingly upscale.
2019 Hyundai Kona
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
MSRP
$19,990 - $28,900
Consumer Rating
(1)
Combined MPG
27 - 30

The Kona isn't perfect, but in a segment full of compromises it offers a great combination of comfort, practicality, fun and technology, all wrapped up in a package that feels firmly put together.

2018 Mazda CX-3
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
MSRP
$20,110 - $26,415
Consumer Rating
(14)
Combined MPG
29 - 31

The Mazda CX-3 feels very car-like on the road, with excellent handling and ride quality. Mazda's attention to detail is also evident in the pleasant interior. Cargo space is only average, though, and there's no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto.

2019 MINI Countryman
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
MSRP
$26,900 - $37,900
Consumer Rating
(3)
Combined MPG
24 - 28

The Mini Countryman delivers a shot of excitement and personality to a class not widely known for either. Buyers have a lot of options for customizing features and looks. There are some oddities to the ergonomics and interior design, and the car's appeal is muted a bit by its premium pricing.

Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
MSRP
$21,895 - $27,195
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
25 - 29

The Subaru Crosstrek is essentially a lifted Impreza hatchback that offers sure-footed all-wheel drive and an impressive set of active safety features. An underpowered engine and middling fuel economy are its biggest demerits.

Edmunds Rating
7.5 out of 10
MSRP
$18,445 - $27,145
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
24 - 26

The pint-sized Renegade is comfortable and offers an easy-to-use infotainment interface. It can also be outfitted with some legitimate off-road gear — in fact, we think it's a class-best for off-road work in Trailhawk trim. A dim-witted transmission, a small cargo area and middling fuel economy hold it back as an all-around pick.

Edmunds Rating
7.3 out of 10
MSRP
$21,295 - $29,295
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
25 - 26

The Jeep Compass has above-average off-road capabilities when properly equipped, especially in Trailhawk guise. Easy-to-use technology features and an easy-to-live-with interior add to the Compass's appeal, though the engine and transmission leave something to be desired.

Edmunds Rating
7.1 out of 10
MSRP
$20,520 - $28,540
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
28 - 30

The Honda HR-V is the undisputed master of versatility, with a flexible cargo area and spacious accomodations for multiple adults. The engine is noisy and lackluster, but the HR-V's thoughtful design and excellent economy make it a solid choice nonetheless.

Edmunds Rating
7.0 out of 10
MSRP
$23,750 - $34,600
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
21 - 26

The Kia Sportage emphasizes passenger comfort and technology. The remarkably spacious back seat comes at the cost of cargo space, and the driving experience is a bit tepid, but the Sportage still has a lot going for it.

Edmunds Rating
6.8 out of 10
MSRP
$21,640 - $28,540
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
27 - 28

The Rogue Sport has some standout safety features and a spacious cabin, but it's hampered by outdated infotainment and so-so seating comfort. The "Sport" moniker, incidentally, is not related to the way this rig goes down the road.

Edmunds Rating
6.8 out of 10
MSRP
$19,995 - $27,610
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
25 - 28

The Ford EcoSport may be new in the U.S., but it's far from a new vehicle globally. That shows through in design, dynamics, and refinement that can't match better competitors. It's an underwhelming product, although it does have a big cargo area.





Small SUVs

Small SUVs are among the hottest vehicles in today's market, thanks to virtues like reasonable pricing, excellent versatility and a just-right size. They've even begun to supplant midsize sedans as a sensible family vehicle.
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
MSRP
$24,250 - $34,150
Consumer Rating
(260)
Combined MPG
27 - 30

The Honda CR-V is easy to recommend, as a spunky turbocharged engine and a comfortable, roomy interior with tons of cargo space make it a strong pick. There are a few mild annoyances from the infotainment system, but overall this Honda is a frontrunner in multiple ways.

Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
MSRP
$24,150 - $30,945
Consumer Rating
(40)
Combined MPG
26 - 28

The Mazda CX-5 has interior quality and driving dynamics that challenge some luxury vehicles. Cargo space behind the second row isn't class-leading, but the Mazda's strengths still make it a top pick.

Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
MSRP
$23,995 - $37,775
Consumer Rating
(37)
Combined MPG
21 - 25

The Cherokee is the Jeep for the daily grind, but it still retains some of the off-road chops the brand is known for. With a comfortable ride and modern tech, the Cherokee lets you have it both ways.

Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
MSRP
$28,045 - $51,300
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
19 - 20

The Jeep Wrangler brings a rough-and-tumble character that's unique in the class. It's definitely the best choice for off-road adventures, though its on-road manners are distinctly agricultural.

Edmunds Rating
7.4 out of 10
MSRP
$23,800 - $35,600
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
24 - 32

The Chevy Equinox comes with great infotainment features, decent cargo space and comfortable seats, but the base engine is sluggish and cargo capacity is only average.

Edmunds Rating
7.1 out of 10
MSRP
$24,105 - $34,120
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
23 - 26

The Ford Escape earns high marks for sporty handling and the available Sync 3 infotainment system, but it's held back by disappointing fuel economy and an interior that's showing its age.

Edmunds Rating
6.9 out of 10
MSRP
$24,800 - $33,730
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
27 - 34

The Nissan Rogue excellent seat comfort along with above-average cargo space and utility. But acceleration is lethargic and visibility is poor.

Edmunds Rating
6.8 out of 10
MSRP
$24,660 - $36,400
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
24 - 26

The outgoing generation of Toyota's RAV4 is roomy and comes with lots of standard safety features and a reputation for reliability. It's not as refined, engaging, or attractive as rivals — issues the new model will be looking to rectify.

New model coming soon
Edmunds Rating
6.5 out of 10
MSRP
$25,000 - $39,500
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
23 - 32

The GMC Terrain is a more premium version of the Chevy Equinox, and as such it's a comfortable SUV with a long list of available safety and technology features. Unfortunately, the base engine is lackluster, and the premium price tag makes its shortcomings harder to swallow.


Small 3-row SUVs

If you need a lot of seats on a tight budget, a small three-row SUV might be a good fit. The third row will be cramped for anyone larger than a child, and there's not much cargo room with the third row deployed, but it's nice to have the option.
Not enough vehicles yet to rank
Edmunds Rating
6.6 out of 10
MSRP
$24,695 - $33,195
Consumer Rating
Not available
Combined MPG
22 - 27

The Mitsubishi Outlander is roomy and straightforward, with some good tech features and the option to add some basic all-terrain capability. There are definite shortcomings, though, including an unrefined driving experience and subpar build quality.

Edmunds Rating
5.4 out of 10
MSRP
$22,995 - $34,895
Consumer Rating
(6)
Combined MPG
19 - 21

The Dodge Journey is affordable and comes standard with three rows of seating. Beyond that, well, "if you don't have anything nice to say…"

Not yet rated
These vehicles haven't been fully tested by Edmunds.

Midsize SUVs

For growing families or frequent road trippers, midsize SUVs make a lot of sense. They have a larger back seat and more cargo room than their smaller siblings, while some models offer off-road variants for buyers in search of something different.
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
MSRP
$26,345 - $38,995
Consumer Rating
(3)
Combined MPG
22 - 28

The Subaru Outback offers excellent ground clearance and capable all-wheel drive. It's a go-anywhere vehicle with car-like driving qualities on paved roads, making it a more versatile choice than many competitors.

Edmunds Rating
7.2 out of 10
MSRP
$34,910 - $47,000
Consumer Rating
Not available
Combined MPG
18

The Toyota 4Runner favors rough terrain — this truck-based SUV has all the hardware you need for off-road adventures. Other choices are more civilized for everyday use and offer superior technology features.

Edmunds Rating
7.2 out of 10
MSRP
$31,395 - $86,350
Consumer Rating
(4)
Combined MPG
13 - 21

The Jeep Grand Cherokee is a versatile SUV that can be equipped as a luxurious road-going vehicle, an off-road specialist, or even a legitimate hot rod. Top trim levels come with a hefty price tag, and the Grand Cherokee's age is starting to show.

Edmunds Rating
7.0 out of 10
MSRP
$31,000 - $44,030
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
24

The Nissan Murano is a family-oriented SUV with excellent seats and nice materials, making it a comfortable people mover. Poor visibility, dated-feeling technology, and some quirks in the powertrain keep it from being a top pick.

Not yet rated
These vehicles haven't been fully tested by Edmunds.

Midsize 3-row SUVs

Midsize three-row SUVs provide lots of utility at a reasonable price. Expect advanced safety features, too, along with capable acceleration when you need it.
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
MSRP
$30,900 - $47,470
Consumer Rating
(41)
Combined MPG
21 - 23

The Honda Pilot just makes things easy, from driving long distances to carrying a lot of people and stuff. With a smooth ride, plentiful features and smart packaging, this SUV has a lot of strengths.

Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
MSRP
$32,280 - $45,365
Consumer Rating
(3)
Combined MPG
23 - 24

The Mazda CX-9 is one of the best, and best-looking, three-row crossovers on the road. It's a pleasure to drive and offers a loaded feature list and an upscale interior. Notably, there's less cargo and third-row space than you'll find in some competitors.

Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
MSRP
$30,750 - $48,740
Consumer Rating
(101)
Combined MPG
19 - 24

The Volkswagen Atlas is a spacious SUV with a third row that even adults can use, a massive cargo area and a comfortable ride. It's a bit underpowered and lacks personality, but it's still a top pick for a family hauler.

Edmunds Rating
7.5 out of 10
MSRP
$25,990 - $46,490
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
21 - 25

Three-row seating is now standard on the Kia Sorento, which gets high marks for comfort and technology features. Higher trims get pricey, but they come with everything you'd want in a modern family hauler.

Edmunds Rating
7.4 out of 10
MSRP
$29,000 - $47,500
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
20 - 23

The GMC Acadia is an all-around strong performer with excellent ride quality and a quiet cabin. The third row is for emergencies only, however, and a price that quickly pushes into luxury territory makes the Acadia a less appealing pick.

Edmunds Rating
7.3 out of 10
MSRP
$29,930 - $53,000
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
20 - 22

The Traverse is one of the largest vehicles in the class, with lots of cargo and passenger room. It boasts decent tech and a quiet interior, but prices are a bit high for the segment.

Edmunds Rating
7.2 out of 10
MSRP
$34,910 - $47,000
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
18

As a three-row SUV, the Toyota 4Runner struggles due to its cramped third row seat. But if you need that extra measure of versatility, you could do worse than a three-row 'Runner.

Edmunds Rating
6.8 out of 10
MSRP
$31,230 - $44,260
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
21 - 23

The Nissan Pathfinder is a competent crossover that doesn't make a strong statement. It's reasonably powerful and capable, but is definitely showing its age, especially on the technology front.


Large SUVs

Large SUVs are classic utility vehicles. These truck-based workhorses can tow a boat and transport a family of eight at the same time. Fuel economy is predictably forgettable, but if maximum versatility is what you need, these big rigs deliver.
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
MSRP
$84,765
Consumer Rating
Not available
Combined MPG
15

The Toyota Land Cruiser is on of the most off-road-capable SUVs you can find, and it also exhibits the kind of build quality that makes luxury manufacturers turn green. Mediocre interior versatility and a stunning price tag limit its broader appeal.

Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
MSRP
$52,130 - $79,200
Consumer Rating
Not available
Combined MPG
18 - 20

The Ford Expedition marries excellent design with a capable truck platform. It can seat up to eight and tow more than 9,000 pounds. Inside, the Expedition can be outfitted with all the features and toys you'd expect from a luxury vehicle.

Edmunds Rating
7.3 out of 10
MSRP
$50,600 - $68,300
Consumer Rating
Not available
Combined MPG
16 - 18

Concerned that the other large SUVs won't be large enough? Try the imposing Chevy Suburban on for size. It's just about the biggest thing on four wheels.

Edmunds Rating
7.0 out of 10
MSRP
$47,900 - $65,600
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
17 - 18

Although it's not as large as its Suburban sibling, the Chevy Tahoe can still tow like a truck and carry up to nine occupants. It's a no-nonsense SUV that makes quick work of many tasks.

Edmunds Rating
6.6 out of 10
MSRP
$48,700 - $67,635
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
14 - 15

The Toyota Sequoia is a massive traditional truck-based SUV with a strong V8 and plenty of towing capacity. If you're looking for modern design and efficiency, one of the Sequoia's more advanced rivals will be a better choice.



X-Small luxury SUVs

Extra-small luxury SUVs offer a prestigious badge at an affordable price. They don't always deliver luxury-grade comfort and performance, but a few gems stand out.
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
MSRP
$33,900 - $35,900
Consumer Rating
(9)
Combined MPG
25 - 26

The X1 may be BMW's lowest-priced SUV, but it doesn't skimp on the things that make crossovers so desirable. You can expect ample passenger and cargo space, sporty driving characteristics and a premium cabin, all of which help make the X1 a top pick.

Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
MSRP
$33,200 - $39,750
Consumer Rating
(14)
Combined MPG
26 - 27

Volvo's all-new subcompact XC40 SUV inherits the brand's familial good looks and packs a lot of charm into a small package, but it isn't without its faults. Front seat ergonomics and the touchscreen interface could be a dealbreaker for some, yet this is certainly one of the segment's standouts.

Edmunds Rating
7.1 out of 10
MSRP
$33,950 - $53,350
Consumer Rating
Not available
Combined MPG
25 - 27

The strong handling and acceleration of the Mercedes-Benz GLA-Class are balanced by a rough ride and a cramped interior. But if bonkers performance is your only concern, nothing in the class can touch the GLA 45 AMG.

Edmunds Rating
6.9 out of 10
MSRP
$29,950 - $41,400
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
25 - 27

The QX30 blurs the line between hatchback and SUV with its small footprint, strong handling, swift acceleration and the option of a raised suspension with all-wheel drive. But it falls behind competitors in more ways than we have space to discuss in a blurb this short.

Edmunds Rating
6.9 out of 10
MSRP
$32,900 - $37,900
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
23

This outgoing Q3 model is due to be replaced, and the new generation can't come too soon. While the current model is comfortable and competitively priced, its aging platform and technology can't compete in today's market.

New model coming soon

Small luxury SUVs

Small luxury SUVs cost more than their extra-small counterparts, but the adage about getting what you pay for is true. These crossovers typically offer a more comfortable ride, nicer materials and better performance, as well as a larger cabin, of course.
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
MSRP
$40,050 - $69,900
Consumer Rating
(23)
Combined MPG
18 - 25

The Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class sets a high bar for compact luxury SUVs with its elegant cabin and balanced dynamics. It offers an extensive list of luxury features and a variety of available engines, but any GLC model should be a pleasure to drive.

Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
MSRP
$46,600 - $80,750
Consumer Rating
(2)
Combined MPG
18 - 24

The Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class Coupe wraps the standard GLC's sumptuous interior in a sleek, fastback-style shell. It sacrifices some practicality, but the GLC coupe is more about making a statement.

Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
MSRP
$47,800 - $87,700
Consumer Rating
(16)
Combined MPG
19 - 22

The Porsche Macan is the most entertaining small luxury SUV to drive, thanks to strong engines and nimble handling. The interior offers premium quality and there's a deep menu of options to choose from, although they can quickly add thousands to the Macan's price. Just know that the interior is a little on the small side.

New model coming soon
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
MSRP
$39,200 - $60,250
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
22 - 24

The XC60 is a sharp-looking SUV with a modern, clean interior that gives it immediate luxury appeal. The ultra-refined interior is perhaps a step ahead of the ride quality, but in the final tally, the XC60 is one of the most compelling entrants in this segment.

Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
MSRP
$37,300 - $47,400
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
23 - 24

The Acura RDX differentiates itself from the competition with edgy styling, a comfortable interior and a long list of standard features. It offers a strong engine and sharp handling, but it isn't quite as posh or elegant as more expensive luxury rivals.

Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
MSRP
$41,500 - $52,100
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
25

The Audi Q5 receives high marks for its impeccably designed interior and long list of easy-to-use technology features. The Q5 also scores well for comfort, but practicality is just average for the segment.

Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
MSRP
$41,000 - $54,650
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
23 - 26

The BMW X3 doesn't stand out for any particular trait, but makes for a capable all-rounder. It's comfortable and enjoyable to drive, but the interior is on the conservative side, and there are some frustrating quirks to the tech features.

Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
MSRP
$36,550 - $45,150
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
26 - 27

Highlights of the new Infiniti QX50 include a roomy, comfortable cabin, a large and well-appointed cargo area and a quiet demeanor. Its groundbreaking variable-compression engine impresses with its thrust and refinement, but overall driveability suffers at the hands of a flummoxed transmission.

Edmunds Rating
7.4 out of 10
MSRP
$42,065 - $63,200
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
20 - 29

The Jaguar F-Pace's combination of sharp styling, impressive dynamics and handy utility puts it in a league with the top players in this segment. The Jag suffers from a troublesome infotainment system and some cheap-feeling interior bits, which hurt its overall standing.

Edmunds Rating
7.4 out of 10
MSRP
$49,900 - $89,300
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
20 - 28

The Velar has style to spare, with a svelte exterior and a stunning interior, but the price might be even more stunning. The Velar also loses points for its needlessly complicated user interface and overly firm ride.


Midsize luxury SUVs

Midsize luxury SUVs generally provide stout performance, the latest in luxury options and lots of space for passengers and cargo. Also included here is a new sub-class of SUV "coupes," which sacrifice practicality for style.
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
MSRP
$52,200 - $109,700
Consumer Rating
(8)
Combined MPG
15 - 21

Provided you don't need the seating versatility offered by its seven-passenger rivals (2019 will bring a third row), the Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class is a great choice for a luxury crossover SUV. The cabin is exceptionally well-executed, and the GLE exhibits a high level of refinement on the road.

New model coming soon
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
MSRP
$74,050 - $90,750
Consumer Rating
(2)
Combined MPG
16

The Maserati Levante boasts pedigree, exclusivity and vibrant engine offerings. A spacious passenger area and modern technology help make it a viable class competitor. Limited cargo space and some subpar materials hold it back.

Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
MSRP
$39,035 - $56,725
Consumer Rating
(6)
Combined MPG
19 - 20

The Lincoln MKX is turning into the Lincoln Nautilus for 2019, but a lot of the important things aren't changing with the name. This outgoing model still delivers a quiet interior and a decent list of features for a respectable price.

Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
MSRP
$41,695 - $65,895
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
21 - 22

The XT5 is a comfortable, smooth-driving SUV with accessible technology features and a sizable cargo area. However, some odd design choices impinge on usability, cabin space and outward visibility.

Edmunds Rating
6.9 out of 10
MSRP
$63,550 - $78,300
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
19 - 20

The X6 is a niche vehicle that relies on looks rather than substance. It lacks the nimble handling implied by its sportback shape, while it also lacks the utility of a boxier SUV. Having said that, it's still a very capable driver.


Midsize 3-row luxury SUVs

Midsize luxury three-row SUVs typically offer seating for seven, or six if you spring for second-row captain's chairs. Make sure to bring the family along for the test drive; it's not unusual to find that the third row is tight for taller children or adults.
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
MSRP
$49,900 - $65,400
Consumer Rating
(47)
Combined MPG
21

The Audi Q7's combination of performance, comfort, high technology and value is hard to beat. With an impeccably-built interior and sharp reflexes on the road, the Q7 is rewarding to both drivers and passengers. It could stand a bit more cargo and third-row passenger space, though.

Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
MSRP
$47,200 - $104,900
Consumer Rating
(2)
Combined MPG
22 - 27

The Volvo XC90 is an elegant and modern SUV with an interior that's worth experiencing in person for both its comfort and design. The big Volvo is held back by its overly complicated infotainment interface, but otherwise it's a compelling product in almost every respect.

Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
MSRP
$44,200 - $58,650
Consumer Rating
(26)
Combined MPG
21 - 27

The Acura MDX is a pragmatic choice, with a standard third-row seat and generous feature content at an attractive price. The are more luxurious and sportier options, but the MDX does just about everything well.

Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
MSRP
$52,090 - $67,490
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
18 - 23

The Land Rover Discovery has a plush interior that pairs nicely with its sleek exterior. It offers a commanding driving experience and excellent practicality, along with above-average off-road chops. Unfortunately, the sluggish, frustrating infotainment system is a real fly in the ointment.

Edmunds Rating
7.4 out of 10
MSRP
$52,155 - $63,530
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
16

The Lexus GX 460 exudes solidity, but it's saddled with dated technology, a thirsty engine, limited cargo space and seats that are less comfortable than you'd expect. Also, the aggressive lower bodywork impedes the GX's otherwise standout off-road capabilities by limiting ground clearance.

Edmunds Rating
7.1 out of 10
MSRP
$44,000 - $47,850
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
22

An upscale sibling to the Nissan Pathfinder, the QX60 is a comfortable and quiet people mover. It lags behind competitors in terms of technology, though, and there's none of Infiniti's appreciation for performance to be found here.


Large luxury SUVs

In terms of road presence, there's nothing quite like a large luxury SUV. With plenty of seating and strong towing abilities, these behemoths are as functional as they are impressive. Not many other vehicles offer quilted leather upholstery along with underbody protection for serious off-roading.
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
MSRP
$73,205 - $99,595
Consumer Rating
Not available
Combined MPG
18 - 19

The Navigator is built to impress, from its incredible tow rating to its plush interior, expansive cargo space and full suite of modern technology features. This is a very convincing luxury ride.

Edmunds Rating
7.3 out of 10
MSRP
$75,195 - $97,295
Consumer Rating
Not available
Combined MPG
17

A luxury-infused truck with presence, the Cadillac Escalade is for people who want to tow, carry a bunch of people and impress the valet, all in the same day. However, rivals surpass the big Caddy in ride comfort and ease of use.

Edmunds Rating
7.1 out of 10
MSRP
$64,750 - $67,850
Consumer Rating
(4)
Combined MPG
15 - 16

The Infiniti QX80 has robust fundamentals, with a powerful V8, a sophisticated suspension and strong brakes. At the same time, this aging model lacks some of today's expected technology features.

Edmunds Rating
6.9 out of 10
MSRP
$85,830 - $90,830
Consumer Rating
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Combined MPG
15

The Lexus LX 570 delivers off-road capabilities that few SUVs can match, but if family-hauling and daily-driver duties are what you need, there are better choices. Poor road manners and awkward design limitations curb its everyday utility.

Not yet rated
These vehicles haven't been fully tested by Edmunds.


Super luxury SUVs

Planning to star in a music video? You've come to the right place. Superlux SUVs are the fanciest of the fancy. They're designed for shoppers who demand the best, no matter the price.
Not enough vehicles yet to rank
Edmunds Rating
6.7 out of 10
MSRP
$123,600 - $227,300
Consumer Rating
Not available
Combined MPG
11 - 13

The outgoing G-Class remains an undeniable status symbol in spite of its age and serious limitations. Stay tuned for our full rating of the redesigned 2019 G-Class.



Edmunds' experts test 200 vehicles per year on our test track. We also test them using a 115-mile real-world test loop of city streets, freeways and winding canyons. The data we gather results in our ratings. They’re based on 30-plus scores that cover performance, comfort, interior, technology, utility and value.



Video reviews

[MUSIC PLAYING] JASON KAVANAGH: This is the all-new 2019 Toyota RAV4, and it's the replacement for the best-selling vehicle in the United States that's not a full-size pickup. Now, the previous generation had been getting a little bit long in the tooth, but it's still been a strong seller. I'm here in Carmel, California to find out if the new RAV4 can improve upon the attributes of the old one to maintain its status at the top of the heap. SPEAKER: To see how the 2018 RAV4 measured up to its rivals, check out our recent comparison test video. And while you're at it, click Subscribe. [MUSIC PLAYING] JASON KAVANAGH: The RAV4 is on a new platform, and it's not that much different size-wise than the outgoing RAV4. The biggest difference is the wheelbase, which is just over an inch longer than the old RAV4. In terms of height and length, it's pretty similar. It's a little bit wider than the old one. There is about 2 inches more ground clearance in this car, so if you're going to go off-road, this one has you covered better than the old one does. Speaking of off-road, there are three all-wheel drive systems available. There's a standard on-demand all-wheel drive system. And some trim levels offer what they call a torque vectoring all-wheel drive system, which has a fancy rear differential which can portion torque left and right across the axle. This is a system that's intended to help handling as much as it can help off-road as well. So if you're going to go off-road, look at an Adventure trim, and you're going to get the torque vectoring all-wheel drive. The third all-wheel drive system is the hybrid, which drives the rear axle strictly electrically. It doesn't have a drive shaft from the front going to the rear differential. The RAV4 I'm driving right now is an XLE premium trim, which is sort of in the middle of the range. You can get a more affordable one, an LE, or an Adventure trim, which is further up, all the way up to a Limited, and then there's a hybrid model as well. The XLE and the XLE Premium is going to be the heart of RAV4 sales. This is where most people land when they get a RAV4, at least that's the expectation. So what is it like to drive? It's a new 2.5 liter four-cylinder, which is the same displacement as the old engine, but it's a different engine. It's about 200 horsepower. And it's not going to blow your hair back. This is not a super powerful car by any means. It makes most of its power up high, and around town if you stand on it down low, you're going to be waiting a little bit for this thing to get going. The eight-speed transmission, however, is quite good. It's got smooth shifts. It makes good decisions. It even holds gears when you're climbing a grade. So the eight-speed transmission is really good. The four-cylinder needs high RPM to really feel powerful. And if you're just kind of cruising around and you step on the gas, you might be wanting for a little bit more power. Which if you do, you're in luck because the hybrid model is a lot torquier down low. I mean, just around town, you can feel the hybrid's torque pushing you around a lot better than the gas engine does. But it's true that the four cylinder needs revs, really, if you want to get going anywhere. And when you give this thing a lot of throttle, if you really need to make that freeway pass for example, the engine gets pretty vocal as well. But once you're cruising around, the engine quiets down and then the only thing you're really hearing is a bit of road noise. Wind noise is pretty well banished in this car. The Mazda CX-5 is the benchmark in this class when it comes to steering and handling. And the new RAV4, while it takes a step closer to the CX-5 it doesn't unseat it from that perch. The steering's quick and it's a little on the light side, but overall it turns in nicely, it feels pretty nimble, pretty agile. It doesn't roll a lot when you steer it into a bend. But it's not the most sporty SUV out there. And to be honest, this is the right way to go with a vehicle like this. It does what you want when you want it to do it. Expectations for ride quality in this segment are pretty high because you have to satisfy a lot of people, given how popular this segment is. And the new RAV4 meets that high expectation. It's got enough feedback to let you know the texture of the road that you're on, but not so much that it's too busy or it gets tiresome. So it strikes a nice balance, and I'm happy with the ride. [MUSIC PLAYING] Like the rest of the RAV4, the interior is all new too. And one of the features I like about it is the visibility. It has these slim pillars and the mirrors are now attached to the door, which makes a big difference in terms of seeing pedestrians that are on street corners and things like that. It's got better materials throughout. It's definitely an upgrade compared to the outgoing RAV4, where the interior was one of its weak points. This console here is wider than it was before because the vehicle's a bit wider, and that leaves more room for cup holders and a console storage bin. Toyota has added a whole lot of infotainment capability to this generation of RAV4. A 7-inch touchscreen is standard, as is Apple CarPlay, Amazon Alexa, and 4G LTE Wi-Fi. An 8-inch touchscreen and Qi wireless cell phone charging is optional. Like the exterior, there are more aggressive features even on the interior too-- these big grab handles with a rubberized coating on the inside, this slim structure on the dashboard. It's got a little bit more design appeal than the outgoing RAV4. Is it as good as the CX-5? Mmm, maybe not, but I think that this is a big step up from the old RAV4. It's pretty spacious in the back seat. I'm 6' 1" and I have lots of headroom. I have a pretty good amount of legroom. However, the back seat is pretty flat, and I don't have a lot of thigh support in this seat. And when you consider that most trim levels have vents for the back seat passengers, overall, they are going to be pretty happy on a long trip. The cargo area has always been a strong point for this vehicle. However, it is about a cubic foot smaller than the old one. It's still near the top of the class, though. [MUSIC PLAYING] The new RAV4's improved fuel economy, sharper styling, and improved driving dynamics are only going to help its chances in this segment. And while the engine's a bit weak and prices have gone up, the list of features available is really long so the value is actually stronger than ever. And because of that, I think the new RAV4 is poised for success. SPEAKER: If you'd like to see more videos like this one, subscribe. And be sure to visit Edmunds to find your next car, truck, or SUV. [MUSIC PLAYING]

Toyota RAV4 First Drive

Edmunds Senior Vehicle Test Engineer Jason Kavanagh headed to Carmel, California, to be among the first to drive the all-new 2019 Toyota RAV4. One of the best-selling vehicles in the USA, this right-sized two-row crossover has improved fuel economy, a nicer cabin, more features and slightly sharper dynamics than its predecessor. It's bound to be another sales smash.