X-Small SUVs

Extra-small SUVs are the smallest and least expensive crossovers you can buy, pairing an elevated driving position with excellent maneuverability. Cost-cutting is sometimes apparent, but top-trim versions can feel surprisingly upscale.
2020 Mazda CX-30
1
Introduced in 2020

Mazda CX-30

MSRP
$21,900 - $29,600
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 28
2020 Hyundai Kona
2
Introduced in 2018

Hyundai Kona

MSRP
$20,300 - $29,350
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
27 - 30
2020 Kia Soul
3
Redesigned in 2020

Kia Soul

MSRP
$17,490 - $27,490
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
Combined MPG
27 - 30


Small SUVs

Small SUVs are among the hottest vehicles in today's market, thanks to virtues like reasonable pricing, excellent versatility and a just-right size. They've even begun to supplant midsize sedans as a sensible family vehicle.
1
Redesigned in 2017

Honda CR-V

MSRP
$25,050 - $34,750
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
29 - 30
2
Redesigned in 2017

Mazda CX-5

MSRP
$25,190 - $37,155
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 28
3
Redesigned in 2016

Hyundai Tucson

MSRP
$23,550 - $33,300
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 25

Small 3-row SUVs

If you need a lot of seats on a tight budget, a small three-row SUV might be a good fit. The third row will be cramped for anyone larger than a child, and there's not much cargo room with the third row deployed, but it's nice to have the option.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Redesigned in 2016

Kia Sorento

Three-row seating is now standard on the Kia Sorento, which is slightly big for a compact SUV but gets high marks for comfort and technology features. Higher trims get pricey, but they come with everything you'd want in a modern family hauler.
MSRP
$26990 - $41890
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
20 - 25
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2018

Volkswagen Tiguan

With optional seating for seven and lots of advanced safety and technology features, the Volkswagen Tiguan earns a top rank among a small group of compact three-row SUVs. A thirsty engine and stumbling transmission hurt the Tiguan's overall appeal compared to other compact SUVs.
MSRP
$24945 - $38795
Edmunds Rating
7.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 25
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2014

Mitsubishi Outlander

The Mitsubishi Outlander is roomy and straightforward, with some good tech features and the option to add some basic all-terrain capability. There are definite shortcomings, though, including an unrefined driving experience and subpar build quality.
MSRP
$24895 - $33745
Edmunds Rating
6.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
22 - 27

Midsize SUVs

For growing families or frequent road trippers, midsize SUVs make a lot of sense. They have a larger back seat and more cargo room than their smaller siblings, while some models offer off-road variants for buyers in search of something different.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Redesigned in 2019

Honda Passport

The top-ranked Honda Passport is one of the most versatile midsize SUVs in the market. It exudes athletic qualities but also delivers a comfortable ride, tons of passenger and cargo space, and a good list of standard features. Put this at the top of your list.
MSRP
$31990 - $43780
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 22
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2

Toyota Venza

Toyota resurrects their Venza to once again compete in the midsize SUV segment. Offered solely as a hybrid, it's easily the most efficient choice in the segment, but it's also surprisingly quick. Toyota shot the moon with this one.
MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2019

Hyundai Santa Fe

The Hyundai Santa Fe impresses with its design and usability. It's loaded with infotainment and safety goodies, and its taut suspension helps it handle curves well. Relatively weak engine choices and mediocre fuel economy are its main downsides.
MSRP
$26275 - $39575
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
Combined MPG
22 - 25

Midsize 3-row SUVs

Midsize three-row SUVs provide lots of utility at a reasonable price. Expect advanced safety features, too, along with capable acceleration when you need it.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Introduced in 2020

Kia Telluride

The Kia Telluride is our top pick for a midsize three-row SUV. Its upscale cabin is quiet, comfortable and thoughtfully designed. It comes packed with standard features and tech, and it even has adult-friendly third-row seating. For the money, there are few more appealing ways to move seven or eight people.
MSRP
$31990 - $44090
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 23
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Introduced in 2020

Hyundai Palisade

The Hyundai Palisade might be new to the competitive three-row SUV segment, but it's already putting its competition on notice. Packed with value, comfort, and capability throughout its trim levels, the Palisade is a great pick for a family SUV.
MSRP
$31975 - $46825
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 22
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2016

Honda Pilot

The Honda Pilot just makes things easy, from driving long distances to carrying a lot of people and stuff. With a smooth ride, plentiful features and smart packaging, this SUV has a lot of strengths.
MSRP
$32250 - $49920
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
22 - 23

Large SUVs

Large SUVs are classic utility vehicles. These truck-based workhorses can tow a boat and transport a family of eight at the same time. Fuel economy is predictably forgettable, but if maximum versatility is what you need, these big rigs deliver.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Redesigned in 2018

Ford Expedition

The Ford Expedition marries excellent design with a capable truck platform. It can seat up to eight and tow more than 9,000 pounds. Inside, the Expedition can be outfitted with all the features and toys you'd expect from a luxury vehicle.
MSRP
$48990 - $80110
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 20
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2021

GMC Yukon XL

The GMC Yukon XL's nine-passenger capacity and formidable towing power make it ideal for large families and recreational activities. But the traditional body-on-frame design takes a toll on maneuverability, fuel economy and ride comfort.
MSRP
$53400 - $74100
Edmunds Rating
7.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 18
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2008

Toyota Land Cruiser

The Toyota Land Cruiser is one of the most off-road-capable SUVs you can find, and it also exhibits the kind of build quality that makes luxury manufacturers turn green. Mediocre interior versatility and a stunning price tag limit its broader appeal.
MSRP
$85415 - $87745
Edmunds Rating
7.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
14


X-Small luxury SUVs

Extra-small luxury SUVs offer a prestigious badge at an affordable price. They don't always deliver luxury-grade comfort and performance, but a few gems stand out.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Introduced in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLB-Class

The GLB's boxy shape gives it a distinctively rugged look while providing ample passenger and cargo space for its size. Throw in some of the best technology available on the market, and you've got one outstanding luxury SUV.
MSRP
$36600 - $38600
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
26
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2016

BMW X1

The X1 may be BMW's lowest-priced SUV, but it doesn't skimp on the things that make crossovers so desirable. You can expect ample passenger and cargo space, sporty driving characteristics and a premium cabin, all of which help make the X1 a great pick.
MSRP
$35200 - $37200
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 27
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2019

Audi Q3

The Audi Q3 delivers pleasing performance and a comfortable and quiet ride. You'll also like its upcale interior and wealth of upscale features.
MSRP
$34700 - $42900
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
Combined MPG
22

Small luxury SUVs

Small luxury SUVs cost more than their extra-small counterparts, but the adage about getting what you pay for is true. These crossovers typically offer a more comfortable ride, nicer materials and better performance, as well as a larger cabin, of course.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Introduced in 2016

Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class

The Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class sets a high bar for compact luxury SUVs with its elegant cabin and balanced dynamics. It offers an extensive list of luxury features and a variety of available engines, but any GLC model should be a pleasure to drive.
MSRP
$40700 - $70800
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 25
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2018

Volvo XC60

The XC60 is a sharp-looking SUV with a modern, clean interior that gives it immediate luxury appeal. The ultra-refined interior is perhaps a step ahead of the ride quality, but in the final tally, the XC60 is one of the most compelling entrants in this segment.
MSRP
$40150 - $69500
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
22 - 26
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2019

Acura RDX

The Acura RDX differentiates itself from the competition with edgy styling, a comfortable interior and a long list of standard features. It offers a strong engine and sharp handling, but it isn't quite as posh or elegant as more expensive luxury rivals.
MSRP
$37800 - $47900
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 24

Midsize luxury SUVs

Midsize luxury SUVs generally provide stout performance, the latest in luxury options and lots of space for passengers and cargo. Also included here is a new sub-class of SUV "coupes," which sacrifice practicality for style.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Redesigned in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class

The new Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class is a significant step forward from its predecessor and a class leader in several respects. Materials quality and design are second to none, and the excellent MBUX tech interface sets a new industry standard.
MSRP
$53700 - $77600
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
19 - 22
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2019

Porsche Cayenne

This Cayenne an athlete among luxury SUVs, and its comprehensive lineup ranges from a green-cred plug-in hybrid to a sports-car-beating all-star with a turbo V8. It's an intriguing choice for shoppers whose life circumstances preclude a 911.
MSRP
$66800 - $164400
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 21
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2019

BMW X5

The BMW X5's advanced interior, sharp new technology and tidy road manners help make it one of the top luxury SUVs you'll want to consider this year.
MSRP
$58900 - $82150
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 23

Midsize 3-row luxury SUVs

Midsize luxury three-row SUVs typically offer seating for seven, or six if you spring for second-row captain's chairs. Make sure to bring the family along for the test drive; it's not unusual to find that the third row is tight for taller children or adults.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Redesigned in 2017

Audi Q7

The Audi Q7's combination of performance, comfort, high technology and value is hard to beat. With an impeccably-built interior and sharp reflexes on the road, the Q7 is rewarding to both drivers and passengers. It could stand a bit more cargo and third-row passenger space, though.
MSRP
$53550 - $68700
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
21
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2014

Acura MDX

The Acura MDX is a pragmatic choice, with a standard third-row seat and generous feature content at an attractive price. The are more luxurious and sportier options, but the MDX does just about everything well.
MSRP
$44500 - $61750
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 27
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2020

Lincoln Aviator

The new Aviator could be a prime pick for a three-row luxury SUV. Its distinctive styling, upscale interior and available hybrid model are big improvements compared to Lincoln SUVs of the recent past.
MSRP
$51100 - $87800
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
Combined MPG
20 - 23

Large luxury SUVs

In terms of road presence, there's nothing quite like a large luxury SUV. With plenty of seating and strong towing abilities, these behemoths are as functional as they are impressive. Not many other vehicles offer quilted leather upholstery along with underbody protection for serious off-roading.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Redesigned in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class

The Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class is a fancy people- and gear-hauler that combines luxury DNA with a princely ride, remarkable performance and a commodious interior.
MSRP
$75200 - $97800
Edmunds Rating
8.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 21
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2018

Lincoln Navigator

The Navigator is built to impress, from its incredible tow rating to its plush interior, expansive cargo space and full suite of modern technology features. This is a very convincing luxury ride.
MSRP
$76185 - $100335
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 19
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Introduced in 2019

BMW X7

BMW's biggest SUV, the three-row X7 strikes an optimal balance of luxury, performance and refinement that should please shoppers, drivers and passengers alike
MSRP
$73900 - $99600
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 22


Super luxury SUVs

Planning to star in a music video? You've come to the right place. Superlux SUVs are the fanciest of the fancy. They're designed for shoppers who demand the best, no matter the price.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Introduced in 2017

Bentley Bentayga

For now, the Bentley Bentayga is at the top of the heap when it comes to luxury, underpinned by powerful engines and some tricky off-road gear. It has access to all of Bentley's bespoke coachbuilding options, including an optional clock that costs only slightly less than the average house.
MSRP
$156900 - $235700
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
Combined MPG
14 - 19
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2019

Mercedes-Benz G-Class

Built with the precision of a military rifle but none of the singularity of purpose, the G-Class relies on style and emotion to justify its price rather than planning or execution.
MSRP
$130900 - $156450
Edmunds Rating
7.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
14
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2013

Land Rover Range Rover

The Range Rover is the one that made the luxury SUV a thing in the first place. Today's Range is a go-anywhere vehicle that can also meet the most demanding luxury standards. It's not perfect, but it's undeniably impressive.
MSRP
$90900 - $209500
Edmunds Rating
6.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
15 - 24


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Video reviews

2021 Chevy Suburban Review — The Ultimate Family SUV?

2021 Chevy Suburban Review — The Ultimate Family SUV?

[MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: If you regularly need to haul a family, a bunch of stuff, and-- I don't know-- a boat or two, the Chevy Suburban has long been your vehicle of choice. And it's been redesigned for 2021, and now it has more of everything-- more space, more power, more capability, more cargo capacity, and on, and on. And it's actually a bit nicer to drive too thanks to some fundamental changes happening underneath. I actually happen to like it quite a bit In this video, we're going to explain why and everything you need to know about the Suburban, and click the links below to see more of what we have going on over at Edmunds, including a full review of this vehicle. Also check back later for a video review of the Chevy Tahoe as well. But let's stick to this for the time being. The suburban comes in six different trim levels from the base LS to the offroad inspired Z71 to this, the High Country. Prices range from about $50,000 to about $75,000. This High Country with all the options it has equipped is just over $80,000. Now when it comes to the changes on the outside, you really can't see a lot because the changes aren't that dramatic. Overall length is like within an inch of the previous generation, but the wheel base has been enlarged. The wheel is the distance between the front axle and the rear axle. And by making that longer, Chevy's been able to increase the interior space overall for passengers and cargo. The other change is something you can't really see unless you stick your head underneath, and that's Chevy's changed from a solid rear axle to an independent rear suspension. We'll talk about what that is and why it affects the driving experience. But for the time being, just know it's a more compact suspension setup that allows the floor to be a bit lower to also give you more space. How much space? Try 145-cubic feet with the second and third row folded. I've left the driver's side up and the second row just like you get a picture of how much space you're working with. It's massive. And even if you drive around in a more common configuration where the third row's folded but the second row is lifted up, you still have 94-cubic feet of cargo space. Not only is that more than the Expedition Max in a similar configuration, it's so much that it's actually kind of hard to picture. So just for the sake of illustration, that's 2 and 1/2 times as much as you would get in a Honda CRV. Yeah, it's a smaller vehicle and a much less expensive vehicle, but it's a much more common one so just to give you a reference of how much space you're actually working with. Now when you lift up the third row. Sometimes they take a little bit to respond. Although, I do like the fact that they're power controlled. You still have 42-cubic feet of space, and that is massive. I like all the power controls on this too. Power folding tailgates are cool, but every SUV these days has those. What every SUV doesn't have, though, is the pop-out rear glass, which has already popped because I've done this take a couple of times. What's cool about this space though is that if you've got a big dog like I do you, you pretty much already know why this is cool. But going further on down here, when you get the advanced trailer tow package, you get a pretty nice setup behind this little plastic piece, which is cool if you want to cover this stuff up. There we go. Here are your trailer hookups nice and cleanly integrated. You also get a trailer break controller. And max tow capability for the Suburban as it sits right now with a 6.2 liter V8 and so on, you can get up to 8,300 pounds. But, of course, getting that figure requires specific options and configurations, and it can be a little confusing how to track down what's applicable to your vehicle. What's nice, though, with this Suburban, and the Tahoe, and a couple others like the Silverado and such, Chevy now has a sticker on the doorjamb that tells you the specific towing and payload rating for your specific vehicle as it's equipped. That's really cool so are quad tailpipes, which you only get with the 6.2 liter V8. When you get inside the Suburban, there is a lot to look at and a lot to talk about. So brace yourselves, right? The general look and feel of the High Country is quite nice, I got to say, especially for the money that they're asking for the High Country trim level. I got to say. I drove a Z71 earlier this week, though, and the interior look and feel was just not as nice as this obviously, but it did cost quite a bit. So I have to say the interior quality and appearance is nicer than what you'd find in a Silverado. But if you're truly looking for that like upscale experience, you have to wait for the Escalade and GMC Yukon Denali. What we see here, though, in the High Country is quite nice and especially with regard to usability. There's, again, a lot of details to talk about. The first thing you might notice when you hop in is this center infotainment touchscreen display. It's 10 inches, and the placement and functionality works really well. It's actually kind of deceiving how big the screen is. You don't really notice that until you use Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, and then those screens look really, really nice on this display. Now both of those phone projection systems work wirelessly or wired. You can use either one. You also have wireless charging down here as well. I got a call that my colleague, Mark Takahashi, when using wireless or Apple CarPlay had a couple of audio issues. I didn't experience those, but we got call them out. Now to the right of that, you have this little storage cubby here, which is interesting because it's kind of deep. And I was wondering what you could put in there until I put a candy bar in there. And then I realized, oh, that's a pretty good place to store candy bars, or skittles, or what have you. To the left of that is the shifter, and the shifter design is unique, I think we should state. Because it looks like it's a push button solution, but it's not. You push Park for park. You push Neutral for neutral. But if you want drive or reverse, you lift up on those toggle switches. We'll talk more about how that works while we drive it. For the time being, I'll just say it takes a little bit to get used to. Now directly in front of you, you have analog gauges and then a digital screen in between that's really crisp and easy to read. And then you have a massive head-up display on the High Country that's really nice. I wonder if it's too big, but I really like it for the brief time that I've had driving this car. Moving down the center stack, I like the use of buttons and knobs. This is really easy to use, really simple, really intuitive. There's not a lot of fussing around that you've got to do with the center stack. Now, when it comes to center console storage, you may sit here and think like, wow, OK, you got cup holders, cup holders, and then you've got this storage bin. Is that it? No, that's not it because the center console can slide back. I got to say, the first time I saw that I was kind of blown away because that's really cool. This isn't going to be on all Suburbans and Tahoes, but it's optional. I think it's worth getting, though, just by looking at it. Because not only do you now have this massive area for bags or other stuff, you also have a drawer here you can open up. And then you still have access to this storage area too, which is really large. Not only that, but the back seat passenger-- the second row passengers now have access to these cup holders as well. So a really cool setup which segues into where do you put Arnie? Where do you contain Arnie? And there's frankly no shortage of places to put him. You have the wireless charging pad here. You have the cup holders here. You have this big place here for Arnie to play in. You can stow him away there were no one can find him. You've got this massive area here. You've got this place here. You've got these little spots on the side of the transmission tunnel to take him. And not only that, but also on the doors-- on both driver and passenger front doors you have cubbies at the bottom. But you also have this elevated area here for phone storage as well. There's no shortage of places for Arnie to hide in. Also connectivity-- upfront you have a 12-volt outlet, a USB-C, and then a traditional older style USB port. And that's it for the front seats. As we get to the second row, let's talk about how the second row seat operates. There's a couple of neat things about these seats. One is they can slide forward and back, so you can control the amount of legroom that the second row has, also the amount of space you have available to the third row. When you fold the seats flat, they actually lower a little bit. So that way when you fold the third row you actually have a flat load floor, and that's really neat. And when they flip up, you have a ton of space to access the third row. These are, of course, the captain's chairs. You can get this with a bench in the second row, but this is what we have for the purposes of reviewing. I'll call out that putting the seat back in place, especially folding it back up, does require a bit of muscle. So just be aware of that. As we hop inside, you'll notice that of course there isn't storage here because there's no center console here because there's a wide open pass through. But there is a ton of space in the second row. And then you also get the sliding center console in the front row so you can have more access to stuff to put things. Connectivity's really strong because this High Country has the optional second row seat entertainment package, which adds these massive tablets that are really clean and easy to read. They're also adjustable to like that. And their inputs are really neat because you have two HDMI ports, two use USB-C ports, and then one 110-volt outlet. That means you can bring in your devices so your kids can bring their Nintendo Switch, for example, and get their "Animal Crossing" on while they're in the second row while you guys are going on your road trip. I like that a lot. Just be aware that there's no traditional older style USB ports. So if you have an older phone or device, you'll need to get an adapter of some kind. And also the rear doors back here have a similar neat storage solution as the front doors where you have the traditional cubby at the bottom, and then you also have another cubby right above that. And take a look at how big that sunroof is. Nice. To show off the third row, I got to get back in there. So I'm going slide this second row seat back as far as possible and sort of squirm my way back here. Now, I'm about 5' 10" and 185 pounds, and I have a ton of space back here. My knees just barely touch the second row, which is slid all the way back. And I have a ton of headroom here. Chevy's been clever and cut out a bunch of space in the roof so taller folks can sit back here. And the seats are not fantastic, but they are workable. Now in terms of interior storage in the third row, I've got space for Arnie-- very important-- a smaller cup holder right here, and then a USB-C port right there. And that's the same on both sides. This is a pretty large space back here for a full-size adult, although you'd probably put kids back here. It's nice to know you have this option to transport larger people should you have the need. And when it comes to getting out, you don't need to wait for mom. You've got a button that'll drop the seat and lift it up. How cool is that? When it comes to engines and transmissions, the Suburban is, no surprise, very similar to the Chevy Silverado. The top dog is the 6.2-liter V8 that you can only get in the High Country. It's got 420 horsepower, and you can only get it in the High Country for reasons. It's the one I want in every other trim level. But hey, it is what it is. That's got a 10-speed automatic like every other engine that you can get with the Suburban. Speaking of, the Suburban will come with a 3-liter turbo diesel straight six. That'll be available later. Chevy says Q4 of 2020. And that'll be nice because it's got a ton of work. I want to say like 460-pound-feet. And it also means it'll have a higher tow rating most likely, and you won't have to stop that often for fuel. You get a ton of range out of a tank of diesel, which is really neat. Now most Suburbans will be powered by a 5.3-liter V8. That'll be the most common engine because it's in most trim levels. That has 355 horsepower. And though adequate, it's not as fun to brag about because the twin turbo V6 in the Ford Expedition does make more power, though, I think. Most people get along just fine with that V8. As for fuel economy, the 5.3-liter V8 has 18 MPG combined from the EPA. The 6.2 has 17 MPG combined, and adding 4-wheel drive to either engine drops your average combined MPG one. I can't believe I remembered all that. [ENGINE REVVING] 6.2-liter V8 goes good, sounds good. So when we talk about driving the Chevy Suburban, there's no getting around the sheer size of this thing. This is a massive vehicle, and you're never going to be able to hide that. But what you can do is you can make a vehicle this big easy enough to drive, manageable enough to drive through city streets like Los Angeles, for example, where I've been driving this for a while. Now there's a couple ways that Chevy's been able to do that. The biggest change, of course, from this generation is the independent rear suspension. But when you combine that, as Chevy has, with air suspension and MagneRide, it makes things even nicer. Now what are those things? Well, the air suspension are air springs essentially. And the MagneRide you've probably heard when talking about performance cars before. But really what it is a type of adaptive suspension damper or shock that uses a magnetically reactive fluid, and it's able to change the viscosity of that fluid through magnetism-- through the magic of magnets-- to adjust the damping characteristics. Now, that's a really long-winded way of saying it's an adaptive damper that reacts really quickly. And combined with an air spring, you have a suspension that's able to read road conditions and adjust based on the speed that you're going and the type of driving that you're kind of driving, if that makes sense So your suspension's able of lowering a couple of inches at freeway speeds to help fuel economy or when you're parked to make it easier to get in and out. And it's also able to rise up when you have it in like 4-wheel drive low with the 4-wheel drive models to give you additional ground clearance. That air suspension's also capable of adjusting for load leveling. So it can always make sure that the vehicle's riding flat whether you're towing, or you've got load distributed inside. It's all really nice stuff. Now on top of that, Chevy's dialed in some really nice steering into the Suburban. I drove this High Country, and I drove a Z71. And I was actually pretty impressed by the steering assistance-- the resistance and the feedback coming from the rest of the car. It makes a vehicle-- again, of this size-- really easy to place within its lane. That's all nice stuff. When it comes to engines and transmissions, when you have a 10-speed automatic, it kind of doesn't matter which engine you have attached to it because the gears are so narrow. It's going to make use of that power when you step on the gas. The 5.3-liter V8 that I experienced in the Z71 trim level Suburban was totally fine. When it comes to the 6.2, that additional power is noticeable. It's really nice when you nail the gas and you can feel that resulting acceleration. Let's do it right now. [ENGINE REVVING] That's good. And yes, it's more of a bragging right to have. But man, I kind of like big V8s, and I like the bragging rights that come with them. I wish it was available on the lower trim levels. Now, the V8 in the Suburbans have a wide range of cylinder deactivation. They can selectively shut down cylinders to save fuel economy much like they can with the Silverado, all the way down to none of them running when you're at a stop. Now during normal driving on the freeway through the city commute, you don't even notice when this is happening. I can't tell. The only time you can really notice the system at work is when you stop at a light and the engine shuts off. That's pretty subtle. But when the engine turns back on when you come off the brake pedal, it's a little noticeable. I sometimes turn it off because that little shutter can be a little undesirable. So depending on how sensitive you are to fuel economy, your mileage may vary. With a vehicle this big, again, we keep coming back to one of the biggest features you can think of is driving aids-- adaptive driving aides, for example. And there's no shortage of them. And the most crucial in this High Country is the exterior camera system. It's extremely extensive. There's multiple angles that show you basically every side and view of this vehicle that you would want to see when navigating in and out of a parking spot like your garage or when you're parallel parking. It really takes the guesswork out of that, and that's important because from my seating position, which is low admittedly-- I like sitting low-- that helps me take care of my blind spots. You can almost drive this thing at low speeds through a parking lot-- almost drive this thing with low speeds-- just relying on the camera system. In fact, when we've been setting up some of these exterior shots that you'll see, I was positioning it basically just using the cameras. And that's really helpful, again, with the vehicle of this size. You can never get around the size if I haven't said that enough. But you can make that size workable, nimble, and easy to maneuver around. And that's what Chevy has done here pretty well. So let's talk about ride quality because this is a heavy vehicle-- a very heavy vehicle. And it's still built on a truck platform, let's say, even though it's a really advanced one with the rear suspension the way it is. So when it comes to ride quality, what is that air suspension doing? What are those dampers doing to quell it? Well, you do get a sense of road texture. You do feel a little bit of that constant low frequency rumble from the road. I happen to like the amount of information that's presented to you. But if you do want a completely isolated ride, you're not going to get that here. And I think physics will allow you to get that here. And I think that actually ties back into the overall control that I sense when I drive this thing, where this is a vehicle that's really easy to keep position in its lane, and it's really easy to maneuver despite its size and how much it weighs. The same thing goes for the brake pedal-- really progressive in its feedback and really easy to modulate even in bonkers LA traffic where you have to drive nose to tail just to commute successfully. I don't recommend it. That's just the way things happen down here. In fact, the only thing that I really have a complaint about is this shifter. I'm not really sure where to start on this, OK? So push-button shifters can work. Unique shifter designs can work. My favorite kind of shifter is just a column-mounted shifter like you get on a Silverado-- really tactile. You know exactly what you're getting into. You pull down for drive, and you pull lower for lower gears. You push up all the way for park. With here, it's different. That's to be sure because you're pressing buttons for park and neutral, and you're pulling up for a drive and reverse. Yet there's no texture difference on the upshift and downshift button. So you do have to refer to them when you want to downshift and upshift gears manually like when you're going down a grade. And when you're pulling a three-point turn, you have to pay closer attention. Let's show you what that looks like. OK, so what we're going do now is demonstrate why I have some challenges with this shifter. And the way we're going to do that is we're going to make a three-point turn on an intentionally narrow road to simulate what that's like when you have to do it when traffic's coming at you. It's not great. So I'm going to give that a try as soon as traffic is not nearby. I did not mean to ride in there. So I got to place my hand in this position to make sure that I have the right kind of leverage over the buttons. Turn in, grab reverse, back up. The seat vibrates when I'm getting near an obstacle, and that works. And it works because I've practiced at it a few times. I found that if I place my hand like this where my ring finger's underneath Drive and my index finger's underneath Reverse, I can make it work. Now, make it work is different than what I'd prefer it to be, and that's just a console-mounted shifter or a steering column mounted shifter that's more natural to me. So just be aware that, that shifter's going to take some getting used to. But overall, I think this is a really nice vehicle to drive given the capability it has to take on and the weight and size that come as part of that capability. Really strong here. So that wraps up this review of the Chevy Suburban, and let's look at the scorecard. Really on the negative side of the ledger you only have a couple of weird things like a somewhat strange shifter design and the fact that you can only get the 6.2-liter V8 in the High Country. Everything else though is really, really strong from the interior space to the functionality, from the technology and the sheer usability of the Suburban. It's such that we're really eager to pair it against the Ford Expedition Max. [MUSIC PLAYING]

Carlos Lago takes you on the road in the newly redesigned 2021 Chevy Suburban. In this video, we'll explore a 4WD High Country trim level that's equipped with the 6.2-liter V8.

FAQ

What are the best SUVs on the market?

Sport-utility vehicles (SUV), also referred to as crossovers, are the most popular vehicle type in recent years. Most buyers find their needs are met by either a compact SUV or a midsize three-row crossover. Our top pick for a compact SUV goes to the Honda CR-V for fitting tons of utility into a relatively small package. For shoppers who have a growing family or who just need extra cargo capacity, the Kia Telluride is our top-rated midsize three-row SUV. If you need a full-size SUV, the Ford Explorer is our top pick, though the Chevrolet Suburban offers more cargo space. Learn more

What is the top-rated SUV for 2019?

Shoppers looking for a little more attitude and capability lucked out in 2019: The redesigned Honda Passport became our top-rated midsize SUV when it launched. Honda had several top-rated SUVs for 2019, including the compact CR-V and midsize three-row Pilot. In the luxury class, the Mercedes-Benz GLC is our top pick for a compact SUV, and the Audi Q7 is our top-rated luxury midsize three-row vehicle and a great choice for families. Learn more

What is the top-rated SUV for 2020?

The three-row Kia Telluride has taken the SUV world by storm, offering a remarkable blend of luxury, space and style at an attractive price. Its corporate cousin, the Hyundai Palisade, delivers similar strengths in a more understated package. Top-rated compact SUVs include perennial favorites such as the Honda CR-V and Mazda CX-5. In the luxury class, the Mercedes-Benz GLE is a top-rated midsize SUV, while the Mercedes-Benz GLS competes with the Lincoln Navigator for top honors in the full-size SUV segment. If you like the Navigator, keep in mind that the Ford Expedition is a less luxurious version at a more reachable price point. Learn more

What are the best used SUVs to buy?

Look for "CPO" or certified pre-owned vehicles if you're shopping for used SUVs. Some of the CPO vehicles we like are the Honda CR-V and Mazda CX-5 in the compact SUV segment. If you need a little more off-road capability, the Subaru Outback is a good choice, and if you need three rows, the Honda Pilot is a top pick. Finally, if you need maximum cargo capacity, the Chevrolet Suburban is worth looking into. Learn more

Best SUV Summary

Best X-Small SUVs

  1. 2020 Mazda CX-30
  2. 2020 Hyundai Kona
  3. 2020 Kia Soul
  4. 2020 Mazda CX-3
  5. 2021 Kia Seltos
  6. 2020 Honda HR-V
  7. 2020 Subaru Crosstrek
  8. 2020 FIAT 500X
  9. 2020 Jeep Compass
  10. 2020 Nissan Kicks

Best Small SUVs

  1. 2020 Honda CR-V
  2. 2020 Mazda CX-5
  3. 2020 Hyundai Tucson
  4. 2020 Subaru Forester
  5. 2020 Jeep Cherokee
  6. 2020 Jeep Wrangler
  7. 2020 Toyota RAV4
  8. 2020 Ford Escape
  9. 2020 Chevrolet Equinox
  10. 2020 Volkswagen Tiguan

Best Small 3-row SUVs

  1. 2020 Kia Sorento
  2. 2020 Volkswagen Tiguan
  3. 2020 Mitsubishi Outlander
  4. 2020 Dodge Journey

Best Midsize SUVs

  1. 2020 Honda Passport
  2. 2021 Toyota Venza
  3. 2020 Hyundai Santa Fe
  4. 2020 Subaru Outback
  5. 2020 Ford Edge
  6. 2020 Toyota 4Runner
  7. 2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee
  8. 2020 Chevrolet Blazer
  9. 2020 Nissan Murano

Best Midsize 3-row SUVs

  1. 2021 Kia Telluride
  2. 2020 Hyundai Palisade
  3. 2021 Honda Pilot
  4. 2021 Volkswagen Atlas
  5. 2020 Mazda CX-9
  6. 2020 Toyota Highlander
  7. 2020 Buick Enclave
  8. 2020 Subaru Ascent
  9. 2020 Ford Explorer
  10. 2020 Chevrolet Traverse

Best Large SUVs

  1. 2020 Ford Expedition
  2. 2021 GMC Yukon XL
  3. 2020 Toyota Land Cruiser
  4. 2020 Chevrolet Suburban
  5. 2020 Chevrolet Tahoe
  6. 2021 GMC Yukon
  7. 2020 Nissan Armada

Best X-Small luxury SUVs

  1. 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLB-Class
  2. 2020 BMW X1
  3. 2020 Audi Q3
  4. 2020 Volvo XC40
  5. 2020 BMW X2
  6. 2020 Lexus UX 200
  7. 2020 Cadillac XT4
  8. 2019 INFINITI QX30
  9. 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Evoque

Best Small luxury SUVs

  1. 2019 Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class
  2. 2020 Volvo XC60
  3. 2020 Acura RDX
  4. 2020 Porsche Macan
  5. 2020 Audi Q5
  6. 2020 BMW X3
  7. 2020 Lincoln Corsair
  8. 2020 BMW X4
  9. 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Velar
  10. 2020 Jaguar F-PACE

Best Midsize luxury SUVs

  1. 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class
  2. 2020 Porsche Cayenne
  3. 2020 BMW X5
  4. 2020 Audi Q8
  5. 2020 Maserati Levante
  6. 2020 Cadillac XT5

Best Midsize 3-row luxury SUVs

  1. 2019 Audi Q7
  2. 2020 Acura MDX
  3. 2020 Lincoln Aviator
  4. 2020 Land Rover Discovery
  5. 2020 Lexus RX 350L
  6. 2020 Cadillac XT6
  7. 2020 INFINITI QX60
  8. 2020 Lexus GX 460

Best Large luxury SUVs

  1. 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class
  2. 2020 Lincoln Navigator
  3. 2020 BMW X7
  4. 2020 Lexus LX 570

Best Super luxury SUVs

  1. 2020 Bentley Bentayga
  2. 2020 Mercedes-Benz G-Class
  3. 2020 Land Rover Range Rover

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