X-Small SUVs

Extra-small SUVs are the smallest and least expensive crossovers you can buy, pairing an elevated driving position with excellent maneuverability. Cost-cutting is sometimes apparent, but top-trim versions can feel surprisingly upscale.
2022 Volkswagen Taos
1
Introduced in 2022

Volkswagen Taos

MSRP
$22,995 - $33,045
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 31
2022 Chevrolet Trailblazer
2
Introduced in 2021

Chevrolet Trailblazer

MSRP
$21,600 - $27,200
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 31
2021 Mazda CX-30
3
Introduced in 2020

Mazda CX-30

MSRP
$22,050 - $34,050
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
25 - 28


Small SUVs

Small SUVs are among the hottest vehicles in today's market, thanks to virtues like reasonable pricing, excellent versatility and a just-right size. They've even begun to supplant midsize sedans as a sensible family vehicle.
1
Redesigned in 2017

Honda CR-V

MSRP
$26,400 - $36,200
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
29 - 30
2
Redesigned in 2017

Mazda CX-5

MSRP
$25,900 - $38,650
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 26
3
Redesigned in 2021

Nissan Rogue

MSRP
$26,050 - $37,230
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 30

Small 3-row SUVs

If you need a lot of seats on a tight budget, a small three-row SUV might be a good fit. The third row will be cramped for anyone larger than a child, and there's not much cargo room with the third row deployed, but it's nice to have the option.
1
Redesigned in 2021

Kia Sorento

MSRP
$29,590 - $43,190
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 26
2
Redesigned in 2022

Mitsubishi Outlander

MSRP
$26,095 - $35,345
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 27
3
Redesigned in 2018

Volkswagen Tiguan

MSRP
$25,995 - $36,595
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 26

Midsize SUVs

For growing families or frequent road trippers, midsize SUVs make a lot of sense. They have a larger back seat and more cargo room than their smaller siblings, while some models offer off-road variants for buyers in search of something different.
1
Redesigned in 2019

Honda Passport

MSRP
$37,870 - $45,430
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 22
2
MSRP
$30,855 - $50,025
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
19 - 22
3
Redesigned in 2021

Toyota Venza

MSRP
$32,890 - $40,380
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
Combined MPG
39


Midsize 3-row SUVs

Midsize three-row SUVs provide lots of utility at a reasonable price. Expect advanced safety features, too, along with capable acceleration when you need it.
1
Top Rated vehicle
Introduced in 2020

Kia Telluride

MSRP
$33,090 - $44,890
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 23
2
Introduced in 2020

Hyundai Palisade

MSRP
$33,350 - $48,740
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 22
3
Redesigned in 2016

Honda Pilot

MSRP
$37,580 - $51,370
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 23

Large SUVs

Large SUVs are classic utility vehicles. These truck-based workhorses can tow a boat and transport a family of eight at the same time. Fuel economy is predictably forgettable, but if maximum versatility is what you need, these big rigs deliver.
1
Redesigned in 2021

Chevrolet Suburban

MSRP
$52,400 - $75,700
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 17
1
Redesigned in 2021

GMC Yukon

MSRP
$51,600 - $72,500
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 17
3
Redesigned in 2018

Ford Expedition

MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
7.5 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available


X-Small luxury SUVs

Extra-small luxury SUVs offer a prestigious badge at an affordable price. They don't always deliver luxury-grade comfort and performance, but a few gems stand out.
1
Introduced in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLB-Class

MSRP
$38,050 - $49,500
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 26
2
Redesigned in 2016

BMW X1

MSRP
$35,400 - $37,400
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 27
3
Redesigned in 2021

Mercedes-Benz GLA-Class

MSRP
$36,230 - $54,500
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 28

Small luxury SUVs

Small luxury SUVs cost more than their extra-small counterparts, but the adage about getting what you pay for is true. These crossovers typically offer a more comfortable ride, nicer materials and better performance, as well as a larger cabin, of course.
1
Top Rated vehicle
Introduced in 2022

Genesis GV70

MSRP
$41,500 - $53,100
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
21 - 24
2
Introduced in 2016

Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class

MSRP
$43,200 - $73,900
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 25
3
Redesigned in 2019

Acura RDX

MSRP
$40,100 - $53,300
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 24

Midsize luxury SUVs

Midsize luxury SUVs generally provide stout performance, the latest in luxury options and lots of space for passengers and cargo. Also included here is a new sub-class of SUV "coupes," which sacrifice practicality for style.
1
Redesigned in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class

MSRP
$55,700 - $80,200
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
19 - 22
2
MSRP
$76,500 - $116,000
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 20
2
Redesigned in 2019

Porsche Cayenne

MSRP
$69,000 - $165,300
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 21

Midsize 3-row luxury SUVs

Midsize luxury three-row SUVs typically offer seating for seven, or six if you spring for second-row captain's chairs. Make sure to bring the family along for the test drive; it's not unusual to find that the third row is tight for taller children or adults.
1
Redesigned in 2017

Audi Q7

MSRP
$55,800 - $72,000
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
20 - 22
2
Redesigned in 2022

Acura MDX

MSRP
$48,000 - $72,050
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
19 - 22
3
Redesigned in 2020

Lincoln Aviator

MSRP
$51,465 - $87,905
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
Combined MPG
20 - 23

Large luxury SUVs

In terms of road presence, there's nothing quite like a large luxury SUV. With plenty of seating and strong towing abilities, these behemoths are as functional as they are impressive. Not many other vehicles offer quilted leather upholstery along with underbody protection for serious off-roading.
1
Redesigned in 2020

Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class

MSRP
$76,000 - $132,100
Edmunds Rating
8.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 21
2
Redesigned in 2018

Lincoln Navigator

MSRP
$76,710 - $106,025
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available
3
MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available

Super luxury SUVs

Planning to star in a music video? You've come to the right place. Superlux SUVs are the fanciest of the fancy. They're designed for shoppers who demand the best, no matter the price.
1
Introduced in 2021

Mercedes-Benz Maybach GLS

MSRP
$160,500
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
16
2
MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available
3
Redesigned in 2019

Mercedes-Benz G-Class

MSRP
$131,750 - $156,450
Edmunds Rating
7.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
14 - 18

Small performance SUVs

Don't let the word "small" throw you off. Compact performance SUVs are among the most capable all-around performers on the planet, pairing major driving thrills with plenty of SUV versatility.
1
Introduced in 2017

Mercedes-Benz AMG GLC 63 S

MSRP
$84,100
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
18
2
Introduced in 2020

Tesla Model Y Performance

MSRP
$57,990 - $62,990
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
111 - 125
3
Introduced in 2020

BMW X3 M

MSRP
$69,900
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
16

Midsize performance SUVs

If you need a lot of space but want sports-car acceleration and handling, too, a midsize performance SUV could be just the ticket. These steroidal SUVs boast incredible power and athleticism, yet they also deliver wagon-like practicality.
1
MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available
2
Introduced in 2020

Audi SQ7

MSRP
$85,000 - $91,200
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
17
3
Introduced in 2020

Audi SQ8

MSRP
$89,100 - $95,000
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
17


Large performance SUVs

The laws of physics technically still apply to these high-horsepower family haulers, but that may be hard to believe when you're hurtling along inside one. Want your family to experience maximum driving excitement along with the usual luxury? These SUVs should hit the spot.
Not enough vehicles yet to rank
Introduced in 2021

BMW ALPINA XB7

MSRP
$141,300
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
17


Edmunds' experts test 200 vehicles per year on our test track. We also test them using a 115-mile real-world test loop of city streets, freeways and winding canyons. The data we gather results in our ratings. They’re based on 30-plus scores that cover performance, comfort, interior, technology, utility and value.


Latest SUV reviews


Browse other types

Top Selling SUVs of
2016

Vehicles included in the data set are exclusively retail registrations to individuals and do not include rental sales or registrations from government bodies*

  1. Jeep
    734,539
  2. Toyota
    633,653
  3. Ford
    559,891
  4. Honda
    539,869
  5. Subaru
    458,228
year
20162021

Some Takeaways

  • Over the last five years, Toyota's RAV4 has taken over as the top sold SUV in the majority of U.S. states.
  • While Jeep had the most total sales nationally in 2016 & 2018, no singular Jeep model was the best selling SUV in a U.S. state until 2018.
  • Ford became the 3rd top selling SUV maker in 2020, despite not even breaching the top five in 2016.
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Video reviews

TRAVIS LANGNESS: It's our long term Bronco, the one we bought and did an unboxing video on. Peeling the screen off here. Very, very satisfying. We bought this one for our long term fleet. And our long term fleet, we drive vehicles for over a year, put 20,000 miles on them. It's an excellent way to test a vehicle. And one of the things we wanted to test with this Bronco is how hard it is to take the doors off and take the top off. So today, I'm going to do that. With all the tools that came with it, hopefully I don't have to crack into my extra supply of home personal tools. And I want to see how difficult it is compared to a Jeep Wrangler, which I took the doors and the top off of yesterday. And I timed myself. I want to see if there are similar times and difficulty levels to taking the doors in the top off of a Bronco as there are to a Wrangler. For more information on our long term Bronco or any of the other vehicles in our long term fleet, click the link in the description below and press Like and Subscribe. Click that little bell. Because you're going to get more videos all throughout the year of our ownership of the Bronco. [MUSIC PLAYING] All right. So let's walk through what we got here real quick. Tools, blanket to set the top down, on a scale to weigh the doors, and then these bags that came with the Bronco. So I'm going to start with just the tools that Ford gave me. And I'm going to go with their order first. Let's start with the driver's side door. Now there's something different about this door than you would expect from a Wrangler, which is the hinges are on the outside on a Wrangler. On a Bronco, on the inside. First step that Ford says is to fold back this front mirror because it's not connected to the door. It's not coming with it when you take the door off. Second step is to get out the little guards that they provide. So you get two of them. And they go in what would be kind of the high contact areas. There we go. There's one there. And then one here. So that when you lift the door off it doesn't scratch the front fender of the truck, which is nice because this thing's brand new. So that's great. We use those for each door. And the second thing you do, take out the wire harness. So simple little wiring harness there. That was probably the easiest thing I'll do all day. And there's a hinge door there so you don't get water in the female part of that wiring harness. And this comes off with the door. Before I put the bag on the door, I'm going to take out the bolts, the pin bolts, then I'll slide the bag on, and we'll go from there. So the first attachment we're going to use is the 13 millimeter. And it should be able to come off by hand. Now one of the things about this that's different than the Wrangler, the hinges on the outside, they're easier to get to. This is pretty difficult to access, even with the door widest open position. There's not much area to swing the ratchet around. You're just dealing with a half inch of travel here. And that's the first part that's annoying. And then also, I have kind of large hands here. So sliding my hands in is difficult. There's the first bolt. Make sure not to lose that. And then the second one is upside down here. At least they don't have a long travel. That's helpful. And the second bolt's out. It's simple enough. Save those. And go get the bag for the door. Now these are all labeled, which is nice. This is the front driver's side door. And you see it in the little diagram there. And I slip it over the door. So obviously if I drop the door, it'll be in the bag. It's got a nice lining, soft so it won't scratch the paint. And it provides handles so you can lift the door off using the bag. It's a little bit tight, but you don't want it to be too loose I guess. There's also a lift point underneath, which I'm going to use. I like that a little bit better than the handle. And off it goes. It doesn't want to go all the way in. The bag is new and not very stretchy. And now we've got a door in a bag. Let's go take the other ones off. Next one is passenger side front. Obviously, you want to do this with the windows down. That was a step I should have said right up front. But these are frameless doors. So you don't have a frame for the window. So you want to put the window down. And obviously they wouldn't fit in the bag with the windows up. So that's your first step. So clippies, took them off the rubber things, took them off the other door, protected from scratches. I'm sure you could do this with something like painter's tape as well. But it's nice that Ford includes these. First things first, pop off the wiring harness. That's super easy. Just clip, out. A lot easier than the one on the Wrangler. And we go back to the 13 mil and first bolt out. Easily done. Thankfully, the bolt travels not very long. And once you get it loose with the ratchet, you can just get it out by hand. That one's out. And this door is ready to come out. Just got to put the bag on it. Now this time, because I learned from my error on the other side, I'm going to try and get as much of the bag over the door as possible before I take it off. Because handling it while it's off the vehicle is not as easy. And we'll weigh these so we can see how much lighter or heavier they are than the Wrangler's doors. Again, it's a new bag, it's been folded up. We just took it out of the bag. So little time in the sun might help stretch it out. I guess I'd recommend that to anybody doing this for the first time. Kind of punch up while the door's on there. And that'll make it much easier once the door's off the vehicle. So two handles, I got one down over here, one up here. Door comes right off. Sit that down there. So now it's time for the rear doors. And there's nothing for them to hit. So I don't need to put the rubber up front to protect them. Similar strategy back here. Super easy to pop off. And it's hinged. So this door just closes automatically. Two bolts holding the door on. Same thing. Large hands. Hard to fit in these tight spaces. But luckily, it's a pretty short bolt from the top. Long enough, but it only took a couple of turns to get that out of there. After two turns, you can get it out by hand pretty much, which is simple. Bolt's out. Then we will get the bag. So the order of these has to do with what they want you to take off first so as not to scratch the vehicle, and how they want them stored in the back. I haven't stored them in the back yet because I'm taking the top off. And they're going to get in the way. And also, I want to weigh the doors. Slide it on. This one's a little bit more difficult with the raised window there. I should be able to get it. This handle here, this one here, or this one here, and this one here. You're supposed to do this with a friend. But it comes off real easy. This one's super light. Can't wait to weigh this. And the great thing about these bags is you can put them in the back of the Bronco while you're off roading and your doors will stay clean. So you can get home with a muddy car and clean doors. I don't know. Maybe that's not great. Maybe it's kind of weird. Lay this down next to its friends, and go for the passenger side. So now we're going to take the bag for the back passenger door, slide that on. This is getting easier door by door, not unsurprisingly as I figure out what I'm doing. If the bolts are out, up and out. Real simple. Compared to the Wrangler, it didn't take me that much longer. There was the extra step of putting the bags over the doors, which I kind of fumbled with. This one's a little bit more difficult with the-- it doesn't want to go all the way in. It is not as easy. But for either vehicle, it's going to be about 20 minutes per side, or about 40 minutes for all four doors, which is pretty good. The hinges are exposed and whatnot. But that's cool. It's all part of the experience. And honestly, how many vehicles can you buy new today that you can take the doors off of? It's kind of rad. I weighed myself. I just have to subtract the difference here. And I also weighed the bag. So I know it weighs 5 pounds. This is almost a 45 pound door, which is 10 pounds more than the Wrangler's rear door. It's pretty significant. Let's weight the front one. See how much a front door weighs. That's 55 pounds. So 5 pounds more than a Wrangler's front door. So even without the window framing, the Broncos doors weigh more. So while it's not a big difference, it's worth noting that the Broncos doors are heavier. It's some extra weight to carry around if you're lifting the doors on and off by yourself. Next thing is the top. This has got to be one of the easiest things to do. So the first step is you unbolt that, turn this L bracket, this other one, this other one, and all of a sudden you're running with the top off. There's also a bag for this. But this is really light. It's maybe 5, 10 pounds tops. So the next step is to take off this middle section. And you can't do this on the Wrangler, but you can on the Bronco. And it's similar to the front. There are just a couple of snaps here. Click, click, click. And this whole thing comes off as one piece. But I'm going to need a guy on the other side of the vehicle to help me move it. So the next step now that I'm a completely open air vehicle, at least in the front, is to take off the rear. And for that, we're going to need the handy dandy tool kit again. We're going to take the ratchet out and use the T50 I believe it is. And we're going to take off these two bolts. And there's four on each side in the back. And then we'll lift it off and have everything off this vehicle. It'll be super lightweight. Well those bolts took a while. It comes out by hand now. Save that. Move onto this side That one's out. Now to the back. Got to open the tailgate all the way and open the glass. And you want to leave the glass open when you take the top off because you don't want this bottom part hitting the ground. And they're basically a series of bolts along here and along the other side, four of them, that you take out. And then this whole thing will lift right off. So beginner's mistake. I almost forgot, but luckily saw it right here in front of me, to take out the wiring harness and the hose for the rear wiper and washer. Those come out and then they go into a secondary slot over here for storage. So I'm going to take those out now. Just a simple pull down clip, real easy, store that right here. And this one, real simple, little drip of water, store that right there. And then you can safely take off the top. Excuse me while I climb in the back here. This is another kind of tight space. I guess, yeah, if I go around that side, much better. The roof bar here, kind of need it for safety and vehicle structural integrity. But it does get in the way. There's one bolt. That's all four on this side. I'll move to the other side now. The final step to taking off all of the top pieces is the back. I want to get my tools out of the way here. Haven't had to use any of these. Just a scale for weighing the doors. And you want to set down something's soft. So I got a nice moving blanket so we don't scratch the top as we take it off. All the bolts are out. You just lift up and move it. We want to leave the glass off, kind of move the tailgate out of the way. And then you want to do it with a friend, you lift from both sides. 1, 2, 3. Set it down nice and easy. And you're done. Looks pretty cool. [MUSIC PLAYING] We got the doors and the top off. And with the exception of the second and third row of the top, I can pretty much do all that by myself. Now most people might want to have a friend with them for the first time they do it. That was pretty simple and you can get it done in probably under an hour. But now, we'll do the fun part, and take it out for a drive with no doors. This feels so weird. What's it like to drive the Bronco with the doors off? Well it's certainly windier in here. Luckily, we're in southern California and it's not too cold out. But if you live somewhere where the weather is good and you can leave the doors off for summer, it could be kind of fun. Now I wouldn't want to drive like this in traffic. It feels a little naked like I'm riding a motorcycle without a helmet. A little bit less safe is what it feels like. But it's still a pretty cool feeling. And the fact that I can take the doors on and off in such a short amount of time, that's pretty cool too. Also, there's no center cross beam up here. This is like having a full on convertible experience. Boy oh boy do you hear those 35 inch tires howling on the ground. Either way, it's a really fun experience to drive without the doors on. Before where we wrap everything up, I wanted to show you a couple of cool things I found when I was taking off the top. The first is this giant Bronco logo that no one's ever going to see if they leave the top on their Bronco all the time. And the second is a set of coordinates near the top of the B pillar, which leads to the king of the hammers race. It's a cool little touch, right? So what was it like taking the doors off? And how difficult was it compared to, say, a Wrangler? Honestly, it's about the same. The procedures are a little bit different, but not by much. You just take some bolts out, and voila, you can lift the doors off. They are a little bit heavier on the Bronco, but not so much that it makes a huge difference. Taking the top, and the doors, and the center top, and the front top off made me think, where am I going to store all this stuff? I don't live in a house with a garage. So I'd have to just leave it in my apartment? That wouldn't make a lot of sense. It's nice that Ford includes the bags for the doors, less likely to get them scratched. But I'm not going to store them in the back if I'm doing an off road trip. I'm going to need space for my cooler, and my tent, and whatever else I'm going to use while I'm doing an off road trip. I have a difficult time thinking of a scenario where I'd store the doors in the back, go for a drive, and then put them back on before I go home. Either way, it's a fun experience. It's nice to know that it's this easy. And maybe we'll see how many adventures we can go on without the doors. What else should we do next in our long term Bronco? Let us know in the comments below. And for a cash offer on your car today, go to edmunds.com/sellmycar. Really. We want to buy your car. Now, it's time to put it all back together. So cue the funny montage music. [MUSIC PLAYING]

How to Remove the Doors and Top From Our New 2021 Bronco

FAQ

What are the best SUVs on the market?

Sport-utility vehicles (SUV), also referred to as crossovers, are the most popular vehicle type in recent years. Most buyers find their needs are met by either a compact SUV or a midsize three-row crossover. Our top pick for a compact SUV goes to the Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class Coupe for fitting tons of utility into a relatively small package. For shoppers who have a growing family or who just need extra cargo capacity, the Kia Telluride is our top-rated midsize three-row SUV. If you need a full-size SUV, the Ford Explorer is our top pick, though the Chevrolet Suburban offers more cargo space. Learn more

What is the top-rated SUV for 2019?

Shoppers looking for a little more attitude and capability lucked out in 2019: The redesigned Honda Passport became our top-rated midsize SUV when it launched. Honda had several top-rated SUVs for 2019, including the compact CR-V and midsize three-row Pilot. In the luxury class, the Mercedes-Benz GLC is our top pick for a compact SUV, and the Audi Q7 is our top-rated luxury midsize three-row vehicle and a great choice for families. Learn more

What is the top-rated SUV for 2020?

The three-row Kia Telluride has taken the SUV world by storm, offering a remarkable blend of luxury, space and style at an attractive price. Its corporate cousin, the Hyundai Palisade, delivers similar strengths in a more understated package. Top-rated compact SUVs include perennial favorites such as the Honda CR-V and Mazda CX-5. In the luxury class, the Mercedes-Benz GLE is a top-rated midsize SUV, while the Mercedes-Benz GLS competes with the Lincoln Navigator for top honors in the full-size SUV segment. If you like the Navigator, keep in mind that the Ford Expedition is a less luxurious version at a more reachable price point. Learn more

What are the best used SUVs to buy?

Look for "CPO" or certified pre-owned vehicles if you're shopping for used SUVs. Some of the CPO vehicles we like are the Honda CR-V and Mazda CX-5 in the compact SUV segment. If you need a little more off-road capability, the Subaru Outback is a good choice, and if you need three rows, the Honda Pilot is a top pick. Finally, if you need maximum cargo capacity, the Chevrolet Suburban is worth looking into. Learn more

Best SUV Summary

Best X-Small SUVs

  1. 2022 Volkswagen Taos
  2. 2022 Chevrolet Trailblazer
  3. 2021 Mazda CX-30
  4. 2021 Buick Encore GX
  5. 2022 Hyundai Kona
  6. 2021 Subaru Crosstrek
  7. 2022 Kia Soul
  8. 2021 Mazda CX-3
  9. 2022 Kia Seltos
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