X-Small sedans

Diminutive in stature and light on creature comforts, extra-small sedans are the least expensive vehicles on the market. They don't offer many frills, but some come with advanced safety and infotainment features that used to be unheard of in this class.
2020 Toyota Yaris
1
Introduced in 2019

Toyota Yaris

MSRP
$15,650 - $18,750
Edmunds Rating
7.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
34 - 35
2021 Hyundai Accent
2
Redesigned in 2018

Hyundai Accent

MSRP
$15,395 - $19,500
Edmunds Rating
7.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
33 - 36
2021 Nissan Versa
3
Redesigned in 2020

Nissan Versa

MSRP
$14,980 - $18,390
Edmunds Rating
7.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
30 - 35


Small sedans

Thanks to their low prices, fuel-efficient engines and commendable utility, small sedans rank as some of the best-selling vehicles of all time. There's something for everyone in this class, from practical entry-level models to higher trims with all the bells and whistles.
1
Redesigned in 2022

Honda Civic

MSRP
$21,700 - $28,300
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
33 - 36
2
Redesigned in 2019

Kia Forte

MSRP
$17,890 - $23,390
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 35
3
Redesigned in 2021

Hyundai Elantra

MSRP
$19,850 - $28,250
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 54

Midsize sedans

Remember the spacious four-door you napped in while your parents drove to the Grand Canyon? There's a good chance it was a midsize sedan. Virtually every so-called "family sedan" offers a spacious back seat, large trunk and comfortable ride, not to mention a reasonable price tag.
1
Top Rated vehicle
Redesigned in 2021

Kia K5

MSRP
$23,690 - $31,090
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
27 - 32
2
Redesigned in 2018

Honda Accord

MSRP
$24,770 - $36,700
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 33
3
Redesigned in 2014

Mazda 6

MSRP
$24,475 - $35,900
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 29

Large sedans

Large sedans are among the most spacious cars on the market. Their back seats offer ample room for passengers to stretch out, while their features and finishes are often luxury-grade.
1
Redesigned in 2019

Toyota Avalon

MSRP
$36,125 - $43,125
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
Combined MPG
25 - 28
2
Introduced in 2019

Volkswagen Arteon

MSRP
$36,995 - $46,995
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 25
3
Redesigned in 2011

Chrysler 300

MSRP
$31,770 - $42,720
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
19 - 23

Small luxury sedans

Even though they're the most affordable luxury cars, small luxury sedans offer many of the same amenities as their larger siblings. Evidence of cost-cutting can sometimes be found, but high-quality materials and cutting-edge technology are par for the course.
1
Introduced in 2019

Mercedes-Benz A-Class

MSRP
$33,650 - $45,850
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
25 - 29
2
Redesigned in 2019

Volvo S60

MSRP
$38,950 - $64,800
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
25 - 30
3
Introduced in 2020

BMW 2 Series Gran Coupe

MSRP
$35,700 - $45,500
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 28

Midsize luxury sedans

If you want a quiet cruiser that can effortlessly transport your family and friends in supreme comfort, look no further than a midsize luxury sedan. Additionally, these models offer many exotic features, including massaging seats and heated armrests.
1
Top Rated vehicle
Redesigned in 2017

Mercedes-Benz E-Class

MSRP
$54,250 - $107,500
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 26
2
Redesigned in 2019

Mercedes-Benz CLS-Class

MSRP
$70,300 - $81,550
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 26
3
Redesigned in 2019

Audi A6

MSRP
$54,900 - $69,500
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 26


Large luxury sedans

The typical large luxury sedan shifts the focus from driver engagement to passenger comfort. It's not unusual to see reclining and massaging rear seats, motorized window shades, innovative safety systems and opulent leather and wood trim.
1
Redesigned in 2014

Mercedes-Benz S-Class

MSRP
$94,250 - $151,600
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
20 - 22
2
Redesigned in 2016

BMW 7 Series

MSRP
$86,800 - $157,800
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 29
3
Introduced in 2020

BMW 8 Series Gran Coupe

MSRP
$85,000 - $108,900
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
19 - 25

Exotic sedans

Exotic sedans offer something truly special, whether it's an unusually sporty driving experience or luxury accommodations that lesser sedans simply can't match. Many exotic models can even be tailored to your specifications.
1
MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available
2
Redesigned in 2017

BMW ALPINA B7

MSRP
$143,200
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
19
3
Introduced in 2016

Mercedes-Benz AMG GT

MSRP
$89,900 - $161,900
Edmunds Rating
7.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 22

Small performance sedans

If you're looking for luxury and maneuverability along with sizzling speed, small performance sedans are where it's at. Based on small luxury sedans that are capable in their own right, these sportier variants are among the most capable sedans in the world.
1
Redesigned in 2018

Audi S4

MSRP
$49,900 - $58,200
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
23
2
Redesigned in 2018

Audi S5 Sportback

MSRP
$52,500 - $60,900
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
23
3
Redesigned in 2020

Mercedes-Benz AMG CLA 45

MSRP
$54,800
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
Combined MPG
23

Midsize performance sedans

The midsize performance sedan has traditionally ruled the roost when it comes to four-door fun, and today's crop lives up to the legend. Expect face-flattening acceleration, track-ready handling and the latest tech inside.
1
Redesigned in 2021

Audi RS 6

MSRP
$109,000
Edmunds Rating
8.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
17
1
Redesigned in 2018

BMW M5

MSRP
$103,500
Edmunds Rating
8.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
17
3
Redesigned in 2021

Audi RS 7

MSRP
$114,000
Edmunds Rating
8.5 out of 10
Combined MPG
17


Large performance sedans

"Large performance sedan" used to be an oxymoron, but modern engineering has transformed these land yachts into bona fide performance machines that can corner almost as well as they accelerate.
1
Introduced in 2020

BMW M8 Gran Coupe

MSRP
$130,000
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
17
2
Redesigned in 2017

BMW ALPINA B7

MSRP
$143,200
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
19
3
Introduced in 2016

Mercedes-Benz AMG GT 53

MSRP
$89,900 - $161,900
Edmunds Rating
7.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 22


Edmunds' experts test 200 vehicles per year on our test track. We also test them using a 115-mile real-world test loop of city streets, freeways and winding canyons. The data we gather results in our ratings. They’re based on 30-plus scores that cover performance, comfort, interior, technology, utility and value.


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Video reviews

TRAVIS LANGNESS: The new Civic Si is here. [MUSIC PLAYING] There's an old one, too, from 35 years ago. That's how long this car's been around. The Civic Si typically sits between base versions of the Civic and more high performance stuff, hardcore stuff like the Civic Type R. And it doesn't just get exterior changes. These changes to the Civic Si are much more than skin deep. So we're going to take a close look and see just what exactly is different. Super excited. The standard Honda Civic was completely redesigned for 2022. It got all sorts of new goodies, under the hood, inside and some sleek new looks. I love the way this thing looks. But we're not quite sure yet whether the Civic Si will make that same grade. Will it also be one of our top rated sedans and Edmunds? Well, for more information on the standard Civic and the Civic Si click the link in the description below, press like and subscribe for our YouTube channel, and if you want a cash offer on your car today, go to edmunds.com/sellmycar. Cash is king, right? So if you've been living under a compact car sized rock for the last 40 years, what is the Honda Civic? Well, it's a compact car and it's one of the best in the class. It's won Edmunds top Rated Award in its class for several generations and this one's no different. But the Si has lots of little things that might not stand out at first glance. It gets more power. There's 200 horses under there. It gets bigger brakes. It gets a spoiler. It gets a different exhaust. It gets stiffer suspension. It gets rev matching. It gets sports seats with more bolstering. It gets stiffer steering. It gets a six speed manual. [SHIFTING] So all these changes in small places should mean big changes for the overall package. Sure, it's not going to be as hardcore and fast to drive as the Type R, but it'll be more fun than your standard Civic. And that all starts here, under the hood with power. It's got a 1.5 liter turbocharged engine, which is the same as the previous generation Si, but it's got less power. 200 horsepower compared to 205 on the previous generation Si, which doesn't really make sense. But same amount of torque. And what Honda has said they've done is change the way it drives. So peak torque comes on 300 RPMS earlier when you're driving and hopefully that means a little bit more drivability and fun before you get all the way to the red line. Then, aside from the additional power you get stuff like rev matching and a limited slip differential. The rev matching was brought over from the previous gen Type R, and what happens is if you're approaching the corner at a high speed and you go to downshift and brake at the same time the engine will rev for you so the transmission meets the engine speeds and they rotate at the same speed. Rev matching is really cool. The limited slip, it's good for high performance driving and exiting corners, especially on front wheel drive cars like the Si. A bit of a sad trombone womp-womp moment here. They're piping in exhaust noise from the engine to the cabin via the speakers. Some people might like it, but it's not my cup of tea. So when you're talking about the Civic Si's suspension, it's going to be a story of all the things that are stiffer on this model than on the standard Civic. Stiffer upper strut mounts, stiffer suspension bushings, stiffer sway bars, larger sway bars, which are the bits that connect the left and the right side of the vehicle suspension. There's different dampers and there's different wheels and tires available. What all this does, as a combined series of additions to the car, is hopefully make it better in the handling department, flatter through a corner. What we hope it doesn't do is make it worse to drive. All those stiffer suspension bits may make it nice around curvy fast roads or on a racetrack, but it might be harder to live with on a daily basis. The previous generation Si didn't really have that big of a problem with daily driveability. I'm hoping that'll carry over to this model, which also has a couple of options for tires by the way. These all season high performance tires come standard or you can opt for summer high performance tires. Then there's the brakes. Now these are the same brakes that were used on the previous generation of Civic Si, but they're still bigger than the standard Civic today by about 1.2 inches on the road or in the front at about 0.8 inches on the road or in the rear. What do bigger brakes mean? Well, they mean more stopping power and more stopping power over time. The larger your rotor, the better you can dissipate heat and the more you can do high-performance driving like on a racetrack or an autocross course. Then, if you get down on your hands and knees you can take a look at the exhaust, which loops around underneath here. It's got increased flow and increased performance and some better sound. Enough about the power and the suspension. Let's talk about the interior of the Civic Si and how it stacks up to the standard Civic and what's different. For starters, you get the same roomy greenhouse in here. Feels really spacious in the Civic and it is one of the largest vehicles in the class, so that tracks. You also get these sports seats which have bigger bolsters than the standard seats. The seat bottom is a little higher up and you get an integrated headrest with a cool Si logo in it. I like it. It's also a pretty comfortable seat and I think it'll hold up pretty well on the road, but I still want to try it out. A rarity in the compact class, the Civic Si gets this digital screen for the driver. It's a 7 inch screen and it replaces gauges. Now, some purists out there are going to say they don't like the replacement of gauges. I don't see it being a huge deal. Then, you get the 9 inch screen. I really like it. I think it's a big improvement over previous generations. Then you get some extra bits of red along here, but there's still a nice honeycomb grill look across the vents. And you get Apple CarPlay and Android Auto through wireless connectivity as standard, which means you can hook up your smartphone without having to plug in your USB. Oh, and two more things. The Civic Si gets the upgraded 12-speaker stereo, the same one that's in the Touring model, and some additional red stitching, which is like along here and along here. It's got to add like 20 horsepower, right? Probably not, but I like the red stitching. It matches the vibe. So there's a lot to digest, there. Lots of little bits that make this Civic Si stand out when compared to the standard sedan. But how much is it going to cost? Well, Honda hasn't told us yet exactly what it's going to cost but we can guess based on previous generations of the Civic Si. The current Touring model is around $30,000. And old generations of the Civic Si were about $2,000 to $3,000 less than that. So hopefully, this one makes it somewhere in the $28,000 to $30,000 range-- starting prices around there. Fingers crossed. What does it compete against? Well, there are a couple of high performance sedans and hatchbacks out there that this has on its rival list. Stuff like the Mazda 3 Turbo, the new Subaru WRX, or you can even throw in some weird competitors in there like the new Toyota 86. But it is down on power compared to some of those rivals. So is it worth the trade off? Performance for comfort? Who knows. We'll have to get it out on the road and see just what it's like to drive. And I can hear you typing in your comments already. Comparison test, Travis? Matter of fact, I can hear myself firing off an email to my boss. Hey, they said comparison test. I'm going to go get my helmet and head for Willow Springs. I'll meet you there. For more information on the Civic Si and all its competitors be sure to click the link in the description below keep on checking back at edmunds.com and press like and subscribe below if you enjoyed this video, and thanks for watching. [MUSIC PLAYING]

2022 Honda Civic Si First Look | A JDM Tuner for a New Generation | Price, HP, Features & More

FAQ

What is the best sedan for 2020?

Based on Edmunds' ratings, the Honda Civic is one of the best non-luxury sedans for 2020. The Civic is heavy on value, offering upscale materials and a tremendously roomy cabin at a competitive price. Its real gem is the available turbocharged 1.5-liter engine, which gives the Civic class-leading acceleration and fuel economy. If you need a larger vehicle, the Civic's more spacious sibling — the Honda Accord — should suffice. It offers even more rear legroom than the Civic and provides a more luxurious driving experience overall. Learn more

What is the best sedan for 2019?

The current-generation Civic and Accord have each been on sale for a couple of years now, so either model would be a smart buy for 2019 as well. If you prefer something that gets your blood pumping, the Kia Stinger is a dark horse candidate that stunned us upon its release. Though the Stinger has a tighter back seat than rival midsize sedans, its rear-wheel-drive platform and turbocharged four- and six-cylinder engines give the segment a much-needed dose of fun. It's also one of the only vehicles in its class with a rear hatch, making it quite practical. Learn more

What is the best luxury sedan for 2020?

There are well-rounded luxury models at every price point and size class. New for 2020 is the Mercedes-Benz A-Class, a subcompact four-door that packs tons of tech into a bite-size package. The cabin materials are a mix of aluminum, wood and convincing imitation leather. It is pretty small, however, so if you need a usable back seat, the Audi A4 is a worthy upgrade. The A4 is notable for its spacious cabin, strong value statement and fun-to-drive character. If your new car search includes a midsize vehicle, the Mercedes-Benz E-Class is our top pick among other illustrious competitors. And if money is no object, there is so substitute for an executive vehicle such as the Mercedes-Benz S-Class or BMW 7 Series — our two highest-rated full-size sedans. Learn more

What is the best sedan on the market?

In the realm of non-luxury sedans, we think the 2020 Honda Civic and Honda Accord are the best models in the compact and midsize classes, respectively. They cost roughly the same as their direct rivals, proving you don't have to pay more to get the best. If you want a more upscale vehicle, Mercedes-Benz has a strong showing in the subcompact and midsize sedan categories with the A-Class and E-Class, respectively. Priced and sized between the two is the compact Audi A4, which manages to outclass rivals such as the BMW 3 Series and Mercedes-Benz C-Class. Learn more

Best SUV Summary

Best X-Small sedans

  1. 2020 Toyota Yaris
  2. 2021 Hyundai Accent
  3. 2021 Nissan Versa

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