X-Small sedans

Diminutive in stature and light on creature comforts, extra-small sedans are the least expensive vehicles on the market. They don't offer many frills, but some come with advanced safety and infotainment features that used to be unheard of in this class.
2020 Toyota Yaris
1
Introduced in 2016

Toyota Yaris

MSRP
$15,650 - $18,750
Edmunds Rating
7.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
34 - 35
2020 Hyundai Accent
2
Redesigned in 2018

Hyundai Accent

MSRP
$15,295 - $19,400
Edmunds Rating
7.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
33 - 36
2020 Nissan Versa
3
Redesigned in 2020

Nissan Versa

MSRP
$14,830 - $18,340
Edmunds Rating
7.1 out of 10
Combined MPG
30 - 35


Small sedans

Thanks to their low prices, fuel-efficient engines and commendable utility, small sedans rank as some of the best-selling vehicles of all time. There's something for everyone in this class, from practical entry-level models to higher trims with all the bells and whistles.
1
Redesigned in 2016

Honda Civic

MSRP
$19,750 - $27,600
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
29 - 36
2
Redesigned in 2019

Kia Forte

MSRP
$17,890 - $23,090
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 35
3
Redesigned in 2019

Mazda 3

MSRP
$21,500 - $27,900
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
28 - 30

Midsize sedans

Remember the spacious four-door you napped in while your parents drove to the Grand Canyon? There's a good chance it was a midsize sedan. Virtually every so-called "family sedan" offers a spacious back seat, large trunk and comfortable ride, not to mention a reasonable price tag.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1

Kia K5

The new Kia K5 has the style and substance to stand apart from other midsize sedans. It's incredibly easy to drive, with a great suspension and an exceptionally quiet cabin that make it comfortable for long trips. The K5 also maintains Kia's traditional edge in value, but bottom line, it's simply the best car in this class.
MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2018

Honda Accord

We awarded the Honda Accord a Top Rated distinction early in 2020, and that recommendation still stands. It's roomy, comfortable, safe, powerful, and fuel-efficient, and should be near the top of your list if you're considering a midsize sedan.
MSRP
$23870 - $36100
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 33
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2014

Mazda 6

The Mazda 6 aspires to more than mere family-sedan duties. Sure, it has a big interior and competitive fuel economy, but it also brings upscale design and a focus on genuine driving enjoyment. These traits make the 6 one of our favorite midsize sedans.
MSRP
$24100 - $35400
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
26 - 29

Large sedans

Large sedans are among the most spacious cars on the market. Their back seats offer ample room for passengers to stretch out, while their features and finishes are often luxury-grade.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Redesigned in 2019

Toyota Avalon

Redesigned for 2019, the latest Toyota Avalon is off to a promising start. A cushioned ride and a hushed cabin make the Avalon well-suited to commutes and road trips, while its interior provides plenty of room to spread out.
MSRP
$35875 - $42575
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
Combined MPG
25 - 26
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2011

Chrysler 300

Bold American style in a big, quiet sedan is what the Chrysler 300 is all about. The 300 offers strong V6 and V8 engine choices along with modern safety and infotainment technology.
MSRP
$30040 - $41995
Edmunds Rating
7.6 out of 10
Combined MPG
19 - 23
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2017

Kia Cadenza

The Kia Cadenza prioritizes space and comfort rather than driving engagement, meaning it's designed to soothe, not excite. It's long on value, too, boasting plenty of luxury and safety features.
MSRP
$33100 - $44100
Edmunds Rating
7.5 out of 10
Combined MPG
23

Small luxury sedans

Even though they're the most affordable luxury cars, small luxury sedans offer many of the same amenities as their larger siblings. Evidence of cost-cutting can sometimes be found, but high-quality materials and cutting-edge technology are par for the course.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Introduced in 2019

Mercedes-Benz A-Class

With an impressive combination of excellent driving manners, stellar build quality and a futuristic interior, the A-Class isn't a less expensive Mercedes-Benz, it's simply a smaller one. It earns our highest marks for a small luxury sedan.
MSRP
$32800 - $44950
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
27 - 28
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2017

Audi A4

The Audi A4 is a class leader with excellent scores across the board. It masterfully blends technologically advanced features within an elegantly simple interior that's easy to use. Factor in a strong yet efficient engine and you've got one attractive luxury sedan.
MSRP
$37400 - $49950
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
Combined MPG
27 - 30
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2019

Volvo S60

The Volvo S60 is a strikingly well-rounded luxury sedan, constructed of equal parts performance, comfort, and beautiful Scandinavian design. It isn't the quickest or most luxurious in its class, but it ticks all the right boxes, and its flaws are few.
MSRP
$36050 - $64800
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
25 - 31

Midsize luxury sedans

If you want a quiet cruiser that can effortlessly transport your family and friends in supreme comfort, look no further than a midsize luxury sedan. Additionally, these models offer many exotic features, including massaging seats and heated armrests.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Redesigned in 2017

Mercedes-Benz E-Class

The Mercedes-Benz E-Class is one of the most impressive and versatile luxury sedans on the road today. There's a wide range of features and engines to choose from, and every E-Class drives with impeccable poise and composure.
MSRP
$54050 - $107350
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 26
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2019

Mercedes-Benz CLS-Class

With its coupe-like looks and powerful engines, the Mercedes-Benz CLS is an undeniably compelling sedan. There are some packaging compromises that result from its sloping roofline, but it's still a very quick and comfortable car.
MSRP
$69950 - $81200
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
23 - 26
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2019

Audi A6

An excellent midsize luxury sedan, the Audi A6 offers impressive performance and technology. Those that prioritize style and fun behind the wheel can opt for the larger wheels and sport suspension, but know that there will be a small compromise in ride comfort.
MSRP
$54900 - $69700
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
24 - 27


Large luxury sedans

The typical large luxury sedan shifts the focus from driver engagement to passenger comfort. It's not unusual to see reclining and massaging rear seats, motorized window shades, innovative safety systems and opulent leather and wood trim.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Redesigned in 2014

Mercedes-Benz S-Class

The Mercedes-Benz S-Class sedan remains at the top of its class, even as it faces rivals that benefit from more recent redesigns. Few cars at any price can match this car's comfort, opulence and sheer road presence.
MSRP
$94250 - $151600
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
20 - 22
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2016

BMW 7 Series

The BMW 7 Series provides a wide range of performance, features and options. Whether you're looking for a formidable turbocharged V12 or a plug-in hybrid powertrain that's packed with technology, the 7 Series offers all of that and more.
MSRP
$86450 - $157700
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
20 - 24
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Redesigned in 2017

Porsche Panamera

The Porsche Panamera is easily one of the finest sport sedans in the world. It has speed, class and luxury in abundance, and it's also easy on the eyes. Plus, the hatchback trunk offers superior convenience.
MSRP
$87200 - $198100
Edmunds Rating
8.0 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 23


Exotic sedans

Exotic sedans offer something truly special, whether it's an unusually sporty driving experience or luxury accommodations that lesser sedans simply can't match. Many exotic models can even be tailored to your specifications.

RankVehicleAdditional Information
1
Introduced in 2016

Mercedes-Benz Maybach

The Maybach raises the luxury bar to lofty heights. With a massive dose of horsepower and a price tag that essentially doubles that of S-Class on which it is based, the Maybach is one of the most notable luxury sedans in the world.
MSRP
$170750 - $199900
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
16 - 19
RankVehicleAdditional Information
2
Redesigned in 2017

BMW ALPINA B7

A high-performance version of the 7 Series, the Alpina B7 wraps a seemingly unending supply of luxury and horsepower in a bespoke and highly exclusive package.
MSRP
139350
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
20
RankVehicleAdditional Information
3
Introduced in 2016

Mercedes-Benz AMG GT

The new AMG GT 4-Door Coupe should serve you well if you're looking for an adrenaline-charged combination of luxury and performance.
MSRP
$99950 - $161200
Edmunds Rating
7.2 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 21


Edmunds' experts test 200 vehicles per year on our test track. We also test them using a 115-mile real-world test loop of city streets, freeways and winding canyons. The data we gather results in our ratings. They’re based on 30-plus scores that cover performance, comfort, interior, technology, utility and value.



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Video reviews

2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody Review ― Cost, Interior, Specs, 0-60, Burnouts & More

2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody Review ― Cost, Interior, Specs, 0-60, Burnouts & More

[MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER 1: The American rear drive sedan, a staple of an automotive industry. Well, it was. The V8 sedan used to be the bread and butter of every American manufacturer. It's where the muscle car came from, and it doesn't really get any more American than that. But over time, sweet, sweet SUV and truck sales led manufacturers to simply abandon what they did best. Want some recent examples? Ford Crown Vic, history. Chevy Caprice, history-- actually, history twice, first time in 1996, the second time in 2017 just to spite us. The Dodge Charger? Well, it's still rocking. How? Let's look at the newest iteration, the Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody. Man, that's cool. So about that widebody package-- all the fenders are 3 and 1/2 inches wider than on a normal Charger. Now, they do that to help cover up the car's faintly ridiculous 20 by 11-inch-wide wheels. These are 305 section tires. That's crazy. But changes haven't just been made to the bodywork. There are new sway bars, and there's three-mode adaptive damping. Another fun fact, the name of these wheels. These are devil's rims, or at least that's what Dodge calls them. But I had a chance to talk to the designer of these wheels, and internally they were known as coffin wheels. [WOLF HOWLING] See it? That's pretty damn cool. A few other cool features about this car, one of them has to be that mail slot front bumper. That takes fresh air and shoves it right in the radiator's face. Something else-- it's not as cool to me, but if you like the black hood, well, that's part of the satin black paint package. And that includes the hood, the roof, and the trunk lid. And I hope you like it, because it'll set you back $3,500. So let's talk some real numbers now. Under the hood is a 392-cubic-inch, or 6.4 liters in old money, V8 engine. It makes 485 horsepower and 475 foot-pounds of torque. And it's made it up to an eight-speed traditional automatic transmission. It shifts hard and actually shifts pretty quickly too. So hiding or not hiding inside this car's massive 20 by 11-inch wheels are Hellcat brakes essentially, six-piston Brembos that clamp down on 15.4-inch two-piece rotors. And these brakes are bigger than the wheels on my first car, which was a Saab 900S, in case you were interested. Look at this. It's silly, but you know what? This is what Dodge does best. They do silly sedans. Love it. [ENGINE REVVING] So no one's going to accuse the Charger of being too modern on the inside, but I don't think you can criticize it for being too difficult to use either. Some people say that it is past its expiration date, but it still works. And it works better than a lot of other cars that try too hard. They try to be too clever. Let's take the ventilation controls, for example. It's a split setup with analog and digital. Normally I'm not a big fan of that, but they split the right items. All your major controls are here. You have a big fan speed knob, auto button, AC. A simple button push and you get the rest of your climate controls. Another bonus about not trying to be too clever, these are big air vents. They're easy to adjust. They flow a lot of air. And they cool a car as big as the Charger. Something else I like about this screen-- and it's not really the screen itself, but it's the shelf right at the bottom. It makes it easy to stabilize your hand on it, and push buttons, and scroll through the many, many millions of apps that this car seems to have, including the performance apps. Now, all of this is a lot of cool information, but probably stuff you shouldn't always be looking at when you're on the road-- temperatures, and pressures, G-force readings, power output, lap timers for freeway on-ramps. But you've got a drive mode selector. This is pretty cool. Now, you've got four main drive modes essentially-- track, sport, custom, and auto. Auto does a pretty good job on its own, and it's kind of hard to argue with it. But I like the custom setting because it allows you to change things like transmission response, paddle shifters, traction control, suspension-- these have three-mode adaptive shocks-- and steering, which is also a three-mode system. It's just the right amount of adjustability that you can have, and you can really dial the Charger in to suit your personality. But this car also has line lock, which is essentially a burnout button. You can't get that on a Ford Taurus. Actually, I don't even think you can get a Ford Taurus anymore. Shame-- not really. [MUSIC PLAYING] So with our test track still currently closed we don't have test numbers for this exact car, but we can revisit some of the ones from a non-widebody Charger from a couple years ago. Now, I wouldn't expect the Widebody to be significantly quicker to 60. It might pick up a couple of tenths time and speed through the quarter mile. It's probably a push. This car's got wider tires, so more rolling resistance. It's got a wider body, so more aero drag. Where I really think the Widebody is going to come into its own are braking and handling tests. Brakes on the normal Charger were quite good, but the 305 tires on this thing can really get put to good use. And the same goes for handling. So I wouldn't be too surprised to see this thing pull almost a G on the skid pad-- in a Charger, which is a family sedan with 11-inch wide tires. I can't wait to get back on the track. So what does this car compete with? What's America got to offer in terms of competition? [CRICKETS CHIRPING] Oh, how about the Impala? No. I think the main competition for this car comes from the Genesis G70 and the Kia Stinger. Now, both of those cars you might say, well, they're not really in the same price range. Actually, they kind of are. When you option them up with all the performance stuff, all the tech, all the features, they cost just north of $50,000. Now, while this exact Charger kicks the door down at about $60,000, you can save quite a bit of money on a few options like the satin black paint and get a Charger 392 Widebody for just about $50,000. That's great competition. Now, while the Kia Stinger and Genesis G70 both have a lot of features-- and they do have powerful twin turbo V6 engines-- they're both missing something, a couple of cylinders-- [ENGINE REVVING] --and that sound. That sound's worth the money. [ENGINE REVVING] What else is out there? Well, we can list off some European cars. I know that not a lot of people would ever consider cross-shopping a European car with a Charger, but I think they should. Audi offers the S5 and the S4. They're around $60,000 too. And now they have a considerably higher amount of refinement, but they also lack a V8 engine. They're just not as fun. They're a little too serious now, a little too clinical. This car is fun. Fun is important when you buy a car. There's also the Jaguar XF. Now, there's no longer an XFR, but there's also no longer a V8 XF. But there is a hot six-cylinder version, but that one's going to come in at over $70,000 when you fully load it. And it lacks a V8 engine. There's also the BMW 540. Now, I know what you're saying. You could just get the M550 because that comes with a V8, but that car is also $75,000 and up. To keep the price fair, BMW 540i is going to be right around $60,000. That's going to be about the same size that this car is. Also has more refinement, but just not fun, not like this is. I think this car can be cross-shopped against quite a bit more cars than people give it credit for because Dodge delivers power, lots of power, and value, and fun. Have I mentioned fun? Because this car is a lot of fun. Let's talk about handling. You could be excused for thinking that when you walk up to this car that it is a total monster, that it's looking to kill you, throw you into the trees any time you touch the car. Like that. But you know what? This car is friendly. It's easy to drive at the limit. And I got to give full marks to SRTs, chassis and suspension engineers, because this car, I mean really, has no business being this good on a curvy road. It should be frightening, and terrifying, and pants fillingly fast, and scary. But it's not. This car is friendly and easy to use. And that's because they just did such a good job sorting the chassis and the suspension. Now, this car is using three-way adaptive shocks. I currently have it in the sports setting. And I can drive this car about as hard as I want to because the car tells me what's going on. Rather than making the thing really stiff like some German performance sedans, they just kind of let the car be big. So it feels big. And yeah, it does kind of drive like a big car, but because of that you know what the car's up to. The car's being honest with you. It tells you where the weight's going. It takes a set into a corner right here. It's telling you what's going on, and that helps give you confidence. You know what's going on, so you can go faster, really. Almost have no business driving like this in this car. It's great. This is just-- [LAUGHS] Now, now, if you want to tell all your friends that this car is a serious ax murderer just to make yourself look like a great driver, I'm not going to tell anybody. If you looked up "burly" in the dictionary, you would find a picture of this engine. This is the 6.4 liter or the 392, like it says all over the car. V8-- this is 485 horsepower. And it is comfortably situated somewhere between lazy and snappy. It does not mind revving, but it's also comfortable just kind of like ripping around under 3,000 RPM. It's really something extra. Like, this is the quintessential muscle car motor. Lots of low down power, not super rev happy, but it doesn't need to be. It's got 485 horsepower, like, everywhere. It just pulls hard, sounds good. This is a traditional eight-speed automatic, so it's not a dual clutch automatic. But you know what? I don't mind. This has really quick up shifts if you want it. And it feels-- it just kind of matches the feel of the rest of the car. The transmission feels heavy duty. It feels like it can take the power that the engine is throwing at it. And I like the heaviness of the shifts. And it can be kind of abrupt, but you know what? It fits the character of the car. Everything in this car fits the character of the car. It's such a complete package. And because it's not a dual clutch, you don't get that kind of weird low speed chug that you can get out of one of those transmissions. This is just a normal automatic. The only thing I wish is that the throttle wasn't so jumpy. This thing, it's hard to parallel park this car because the throttle is just hair trigger. That first gear's short. It's a little too short. But, you know. I have to complain about something, right? [MUSIC PLAYING] For years, Dodge has continued to tweak and improve both the car's content and the performance. And the SRT guys love this car. They go to the car shows. They talk to the owners. They show them new paint colors and graphics packages. And then they go back to the factory and they deliver the goods. So with this new Charger Widebody, even in the lesser Scat Pack version, consider the goods delivered. [ENGINE REVVING] This thing's wild. I love a manual though. I mean, you guys can just lift it out of the Challenger, right? And can you put some carbon brakes on this thing? [MUSIC PLAYING]

The Dodge Charger carries on the long and wonderfully American tradition of rear-wheel-drive V8-powered family sedans. In this video, Kurt Niebuhr reviews the 2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody and explains why it remains one of the best of its kind.

FAQ

What are the best sedans on the market?
Most buyers find their needs are met by either a compact sedan or a mid-size sedan. Our top pick for a small sedan goes to the Honda Civic for its great drivability and utility. For shoppers with family needs or who just want more space, the Kia K5 is our top-rated midsize sedan. If you're looking to step up to a luxury sedan, the Mercedes-Benz A-Class provides excellent premium comfort and features at an accessible price. Learn more
What is the top-rated sedan for 2019?
Luxury shoppers were in for a treat in 2019, when Mercedes-Benz introduced the new A-Class, a small sedan big on luxury features and design. In the large sedan segment, the redesigned Toyota Avalon took the top-rated spot with its bold new look and quiet, roomy interior. Learn more
What is the top-rated sedan for 2018?
The newest generation of the Honda Accord was introduced in 2018, becoming our top-rated midsize sedan for its excellent interior space, long list of technology features, and refined driving experience Also in 2018, buyers looking for a strong value proposition lucked out with the introduction of the new generation of Kia Rio sedan, an extra-small sedan that's pleasant to live with. Learn more
What are the best used sedans to buy?
Look for "CPO" or certified pre-owned vehicles if you're shopping for used sedans. Among lightly used sedans likely to be available via CPO programs, we like the Honda Civic in the small sedan segment. If you need a little more space and more driving excitement, the Mazda 6 is a strong choice, and the Honda Accord is our top pick for a used midsize sedan. Learn more

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