Electric vehicles

Mainstream electric cars are either battery- or hydrogen-powered, offering a driving range of anywhere from about 60 miles to 200-plus. They tend to be small but practical cars, many with hatchback bodies.
2021 Tesla Model 3
1
Top Rated vehicle
Introduced in 2017

Tesla Model 3

MSRP
$44,990 - $58,990
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
30
2022 Kia Niro EV
2
Introduced in 2019

Kia Niro EV

MSRP
$39,990 - $44,650
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
30
2021 Volkswagen ID.4
3
Introduced in 2021

Volkswagen ID.4

MSRP
$39,995 - $48,175
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
35


Luxury electric cars

Luxury electric cars tend to cost a lot more than mainstream models, but you get a lot more, too, typically including sports-car acceleration and the latest interior tech.
1
Introduced in 2017

Tesla Model 3 Performance

MSRP
$58,990
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
30
2
Introduced in 2021

Polestar 2

MSRP
$59,900
Edmunds Rating
8.1 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
37
3
Introduced in 2014

BMW i3

MSRP
$44,450 - $51,500
Edmunds Rating
7.8 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
32


Luxury electric SUVs

Given the popularity of luxury SUVs, it's no surprise that luxury electric SUVs are on the rise. Versatile interior space, cutting-edge technology and impressive power are par for the course.
1
Introduced in 2021

Ford Mustang Mach-E

MSRP
$42,895 - $59,995
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
40
2
Introduced in 2020

Tesla Model Y Long Range

MSRP
$57,990 - $62,990
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
30
3
Introduced in 2021

Ford Mach-E GT

MSRP
$59,900
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
40

Luxury electric trucks

Electric trucks tend to cost a pretty penny, so we consider them luxury vehicles by default. But if you can get past the price tags, you'll find that this new pickup breed offers a beguiling blend of performance, utility and, yes, luxury features.
Not enough vehicles yet to rank
Top Rated vehicle
Introduced in 2022

Rivian R1T

MSRP
$67,500 - $73,000
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
48


Super luxury electric cars

1
MSRP
$93,700 - $187,600
Edmunds Rating
8.3 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
47
2
MSRP
Not available
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
Not available
2
Introduced in 2020

Porsche Taycan 4S

MSRP
$82,700 - $185,000
Edmunds Rating
8.2 out of 10
kWh / 100 mi.The amount of battery energy (kilowatt-hours) an electric vehicle uses to travel 100 miles.
48


Edmunds' experts test 200 vehicles per year on our test track. We also test them using a 115-mile real-world test loop of city streets, freeways and winding canyons. The data we gather results in our ratings. They’re based on 30-plus scores that cover performance, comfort, interior, technology, utility and value.


Latest electric vehicle reviews


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Video reviews

RYAN ZUMMALLEN: If you haven't been paying close attention to EVs in a while, well, hold on to your butts. Today, we'll highlight 10 that have received the highest scores in our exhaustive testing. These 10 EVs are broken up into three categories, sedans, SUVs, and trucks. Before we get going, make sure you subscribe to our channel and hit that Like button. And, if you're trying to sell your car, go to edmunds.com/sellmycar to get a cash offer right now. The Edmunds test team puts each vehicle through an intense evaluation, logging each car's performance, spaciousness, efficiency, and more. Then we score them in dozens of categories, add up all the points and ta-da, a top 10 ranking as of the making of this video. With that in mind, let's dive right in and see what we've got. Up first is the Tesla Model 3. The compact sedan with the big range and giant reputation. Basically, the Model 3 is a technological marvel. It has all the best parts of Tesla engineering wrapped in a small approachable package. Even better, you can use the supercharging network to juice up. And maybe best of all, you get periodic updates over the air just like a smartphone. Now you have more driving modes, games you can play or streaming platforms you can watch on the main screen today than you did yesterday. That also means you get the drawbacks of the Tesla experience. (SINGING) You must worship at the altar of the touchscreen. It's the only way to control nearly all functions. And there's no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto. Those are the apps that easily link your phone to your maps, phone calls and music that we really enjoy in other brands. It also means interior quality issues and EPA range estimates that we've never been able to fully match on our real world Edmunds EV range test. So it should say a lot about our opinion of the Model 3 that, despite those issues, it's still our Edmunds top rated EV for 2022. Let's get luxurious for a second, shall we? (IN HAUGHTY ACCENT) Yes, well, now we've come to the Mercedes EQS, a stately new sedan powered by electric propulsion for trips to the theater. Enough of that. The EQS is like an electric S-Class. And we know this because their length and wheelbases are almost identical. Like you'd expect from Mercedes, the EQS is ultra comfortable and very smooth on the road. Not quite as smooth but very close. What we really liked, the EQS is rated for 350 miles of range. But in our Edmunds EV range test, it easily exceeded 400 miles. That's under-promising and over-delivering on an astonishing level, folks. What happens when legacy luxury automakers get into the EV game? Impressive over-engineering that stretches our idea of what an EV can do. The Taycan is an exceptionally comfortable Cruiser and it outperforms its own estimated electric range, based on our testing. This is the electric performance car to get at the moment for its quick acceleration, but also attention to responsive handling and braking. As for downsides, the standard Taycan doesn't have much trunk space and it's low to the ground like a sports car, which isn't always easy to get in and out. Finally, this is a big one for lots of EV drivers, there is no one pedal driving down to a stop. But the Taycan is still a droolworthy EV, and we'll take as many of those as we can get. The Tesla Model S opened the door for lots of cars on this list. The Model S has not only kept pace with the new rivals sprouting up around it, but it's actually still leading the pack in many regards. For instance, Tesla claims an estimated 405 miles of range on the Model S long range. When it comes to estimates, handily beats everything on this list. It's just the EQS we tested went up to 422 miles. Then there's speed. Tesla replaced its popular Model S performance with the Model S Plaid. Maybe you heard of it? We did a video on it. It received some attention because it's mind-blowingly fast. SPEAKER 1: Oh my god. RYAN ZUMMALLEN: Uses a goofy steering wheel? You didn't hear about this? Anyway. Our observed 0 to 60 mile per hour acceleration was 2.3 seconds, which is straight up bonkers, and the fastest vehicle Edmunds has ever tested. There's been controversy swirling around the Model S since its debut but, at the end of the day, it's an impressive machine indeed. SPEAKER 1: Whew. RYAN ZUMMALLEN: Next up is the Kia Niro EV. We think the Niro EV is an excellent choice for shoppers because it hits specific target areas we know they're interested in, comfort, spaciousness, range, and, above all else, value. If electric vehicles are really going to take hold, they need to make financial sense to people. And the Niro does that, with an attractive starting price around $40,000, and lots of standard features. It's the Kia of EVs, which is not a bad thing at all. Electric Porsches and Benzes are fun, but it's the electric Kias and other affordable options that will really make EVs here to stay. If you want to try an EV but also want to stay anonymous, I've got the one for you, the Volkswagen ID.4. It's got a pretty nondescript shape and inoffensive styling. The ID.4 is actually pretty interesting under the surface. Wireless connectivity for Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are standard. And the advanced driving aids are very well tuned. You can even option up to massaging seats. It also has an attractive price for an electric crossover at around 40k which, remember, is the same as the Kia Niro. That helps make it a near-perfect EV for families. Functional, spacious, and comfortable, it's clear that Volkswagen prioritized practicality. Total EPA estimated range can go as high as 260 miles. And we found that the ID.4 will far surpass that number if you need it to. Volkswagen appears to have made the 21st century people's car. Personally, I'm not all that interested in the debate about whether the Ford Mustang Mach-E should really be called a Mustang or not. The name just isn't that precious to me, unless we're talking about the Mach-E GT which, if you saw my video on it, only provides 5 seconds of full power and is a disgrace to nearly 60 years of Mustang pedigree. True, the GT is a lot of fun to drive, but it also starts around $60k. The standard Mach-E, however, starts under $45,000 before federal tax credits. And it's a really nice blend of performance, comfort, and style. There's also a large touchscreen with wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. Plus, estimated range up to 300 miles. And the Mach-E has exceeded its ratings in our testing so far. Here's the big takeaway from our hands-on evaluation, the Mach-E is buttoned up and detail-oriented with not a lot of weak spots. We're back with more Tesla. The Tesla Model Y is a crossover SUV and, with it, you get all of Tesla's most promising attributes, giant screen, supercharger stations, autopilot driver assist features, roomy seating and cargo space, and lots of range, just to name a few. We've sampled all this and more because we own a long term Model Y Performance, but the Model Y we recommend specifically is not the Performance but the Long Range. In our eyes, this is a better buy for most folks because you get more range and more comfort at a lower price. To a lot of people, the Model Y is a no-brainer, and we're fans too. We're just not sold on the interior quality, the fealty to the touchscreen, or the fact that no Tesla has ever met or exceeded its estimated range in our testing. You'll be able to tell when EV demand is really serious when automakers start to bring out super niche variants to fill all the little cracks and crevices of the automotive market like, for instance, if there were to be a high performance luxury station wagon with air suspension. Wait, there is one. The Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo, our 2022 Edmunds top rated luxury EV. So maybe SUV is stretching the definition a teensy bit here, but with the Cross Turismo's added utility and available off-road package over the standard Taycan, it certainly deserves some recognition for its capability. Now, it can be pricey. There's also no one pedal driving, and the Cross Turismo doesn't go as far as the regular Tayan on a single charge. But the starting price, around $95,000, is about that of a Tesla Model S. With pricing out the window, there's no question which one we'd take, the long boy. So far, we've seen a lot of amazing tech, and engineering, and luxury. But you know what we haven't seen yet? A bed. That ends now with the Rivian R1T. Our pick for the 2022 Edmunds top rated Editor's Choice Award, the first fully electric pickup truck to hit the streets. The R1T has loads of power, a comfortable and spacious interior, and smooth consistent braking. You can even one pedal drive it down to a stop due to strong regenerative brakes. You get more payload than a midsize truck and comparable towing to full size trucks. Then there's the clever storage tunnel which is just [CLAPPING] bravo. The R1T is expensive at around $70,000, and not all that efficient. It has an estimated range of 314 miles and, while our testing backed that up, the R1T used a lot of energy to do it. But there is currently nothing like this on the market, at least not until the Ford Lightning shows up and the Tesla Cybertruck shows up in-- [CRICKETS]. The R1T is versatile and it opens the door to a future with trucks that emit nothing. Now, wouldn't that be something? No matter what kind of electric vehicle you're on the hunt for, you can probably find at least one on this list that fits your needs. And sit tight because, in just the next few weeks, we'll have a closer look at the Hyundai Ioniq 5, the Lucid Air luxury EV, and many more, as we only expect EVs to come in more sizes and styles and options. Thanks so much for watching. Don't forget to hit Like, if you like the video, and leave a comment to let us know which of these EVs is your pick. Finally, for all your car shopping needs, remember to visit edmunds.com.

Best Electric Cars Right Now | Ranking the Tesla Model Y, Porsche Taycan, Rivian R1T — More

FAQ

What are the best electric vehicles on the market?

Our top rated mainstream electric vehicle is the Tesla Model 3 for its excellent range, drivability, and practicality. Buyers looking for something with more performance and premium features should take a look at the Ford Mustang Mach-E, our top-rated luxury electric SUV, or the Porsche Taycan, our top-rated luxury electric car. Learn more

What is the top-rated electric vehicle for 2019?

2019 saw the introduction of the Kia Niro EV, which jumped immediately to the top of our EV rankings. A long-range electric car with a roomy and practical cabin, the Niro EV is a good choice for small families. For luxury buyers, the Audi e-tron launched in 2019, providing an all-electric alternative to a two-row luxury SUV. The e-tron tied the Tesla Model 3 for first place in our luxury EV rankings. Learn more

What is the top-rated electric vehicle for 2018?

In 2018 the Tesla Model 3 had little competition in the EV space, offering plenty of range, performance, and technology. For more budget-minded EV buyers, the Chevrolet Bolt delivered zippy acceleration and multi-day range in a commuter friendly package, while the second-generation Nissan Leaf launched with a budget-friendly base model and longer-range Leaf Plus model. Learn more

What are the best used electric vehicles to buy?

Used electric vehicles can be an excellent value because of steeper-than-average devaluation in the first few years. Look for "CPO" or certified pre-owned vehicles if you're shopping for used EVs, and check how long the warranty on the vehicle's battery pack has left (a high-cost item should maintenance be required). Unless you've researched the pros and cons, we recommend against buying an older or higher-mileage used EV, as aging battery technology creates unique challenges. Learn more

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