2017 Honda Accord

2017 Honda Accord Review

The 2017 Honda Accord is a must-drive if you're looking for a family-friendly midsize sedan.
4.0 / 5
Edmunds overall rating
author
by Cameron Rogers
Edmunds Editor

Edmunds expert review

Building on last year's significant updates, the 2017 Honda Accord should appeal whether you're prioritizing interior space, fuel economy, value or even an engaging driving experience. Read on to learn more why the Accord is a must-drive if you're shopping for a midsize sedan or coupe.

Following some notable revisions last year, the 2017 Honda Accord is essentially a carryover model, and an aging one at that, considering Honda last gave its Accord a full redesign for the 2013 model year. Even so, most of the midsize sedan segment is still playing catchup. The current Accord is arguably Honda at its finest. It scores highly in just about every category, and unlike many rivals, it's a genuine pleasure to drive. If you're looking for a family sedan that does it all, or perhaps a sporty yet still roomy coupe, the 2017 Accord's across-the-board excellence simply cannot be ignored.



What's new for 2017

The 2017 Accord is largely unchanged, although a Sport Special Edition sedan is new. It includes the regular Sport's features plus heated leather seats with red accent stitching.

We recommend

While all of the Accord trims provide good value, there's one standout that we can wholeheartedly get behind. The Accord Sport sedan is one of the best deals in the business thanks to its healthy features roster and reasonable price. If you're with us in feeling lukewarm about the touchscreen, you're in luck — the Sport doesn't have it. You can even bolster the Sport's persona and get it with a manual transmission. As for the coupe, we'd spend a bit more and go with the Accord EX-L V6 coupe. Its features buff out the car's appeal, and the V6 brings some old-school Honda flavor to the mix.



Trim levels & features

The front-wheel-drive 2017 Honda Accord is available in two body styles. Sedans come in LX, Sport, Sport Special Edition (Sport SE), EX, EX-L, EX-L V6 and Touring trims. Coupes are available in LX-S, EX, EX-L, EX-L V6 and Touring trims. Upgrading from one trim to the next gets you more features,  and we think the associated price bumps are appropriate given the upgrades you get. A suite of advanced safety systems called Honda Sensing is available on all trims except Touring (where it's standard), but our lackluster experiences with this system make it difficult to recommend.

Starting with the sedans, the base LX is quite generously equipped and powered by a 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine (185 horsepower, 181 pound-feet) paired to a six-speed manual transmission or continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT). Feature highlights include 16-inch alloy wheels, dual-zone automatic climate control, a 7.7-inch central display (not to be confused with the touchscreen that's added on higher trims), Bluetooth, a rearview camera, a height-adjustable driver seat, a one-piece folding rear seat and a four-speaker sound system.

Opting for our favorite, the Sport, gets you a bit more power (189 hp, 182 lb-ft), 19-inch wheels, LED daytime running lights and foglights, cloth seating with imitation-leather bolsters, a power driver seat, a 60/40-split folding rear seat and a leather-wrapped steering wheel (with shift paddles if the automatic transmission is specified).

The Sport Special Edition is very similar to the regular Sport, but it adds special-edition badging, heated front seats and leather seats with red accent stitching.

The Accord EX also builds off the LX, but it focuses more on extra amenities than sportiness, adding 17-inch wheels, LED daytime running lights and foglights, heated mirrors, a sunroof, keyless ignition and entry, remote ignition (with the automatic transmission), the power driver seat,Honda's LaneWatch blind-spot camera system, a six-speaker sound system with a 7-inch touchscreen interface (the standard 7.7-inch display remains as well) and satellite and HD radio. Also standard is smartphone app integration via HondaLink (with smartphone-enabled Aha radio features), Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.

The EX-L trim comes with the CVT and adds leather upholstery, driver-seat memory functions, a power passenger seat, heated front seats, an auto-dimming rearview mirror and an upgraded seven-speaker sound system. As its name suggests, the EX-L V6 is powered by a 3.5-liter V6 (278 hp, 252 lb-ft) matched to a six-speed automatic.

All of the above trims can be outfitted with the Honda Sensing package, which includes adaptive cruise control, forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking, and lane departure warning and mitigation. A navigation system is optional for the EX-L and EX-L V6.

The range-topping Touring takes the EX-L V6 offerings and adds the features from the Honda Sensing package as well as 19-inch wheels, LED headlights (with automatic high-beam control), automatic wipers, front and rear parking sensors, a rear decklid spoiler, heated outboard rear seats and the navigation system.

For the Accord coupe, the base LX-S trim is similar to the LX sedan but adds 17-inch wheels and the six-speaker audio system. The coupe's EX, EX-L, EX-L V6 and Touring trims are also comparable to the sedan's in terms of equipment, though every EX variant gets 18-inch wheels (the Touring gets 19s). Note that all automatic-transmission coupes include standard paddle shifters.



Trim tested

Each vehicle typically comes in multiple versions, although trim levels share many aspects. The ratings in this review are based on our full test of the 2016 Honda Accord EX-L (2.4L 4-cyl.; CVT automatic).

Edmunds Scorecard

Overall4.0 / 5

Driving

4.5 / 5

Acceleration4.5 / 5
Braking5.0 / 5
Steering4.0 / 5
Handling4.0 / 5
Drivability5.0 / 5

Comfort

4.5 / 5

Seat comfort4.0 / 5
Ride comfort5.0 / 5
Noise & vibration4.0 / 5
Climate control3.0 / 5

Interior

4.5 / 5

Ease of use3.0 / 5
Getting in/getting out4.0 / 5
Driving position4.0 / 5
Roominess5.0 / 5
Visibility4.5 / 5
Quality4.5 / 5

Utility

4.0 / 5

Small-item storage5.0 / 5
Cargo space3.0 / 5

Technology

3.0 / 5

Audio & navigation2.0 / 5
Smartphone integration3.0 / 5
Driver aids2.5 / 5
Voice control5.0 / 5

Driving4.5

The 2017 Honda Accord is a top-performing family sedan. Acceleration and braking are among the segment best with the V6 model being quicker than many base model luxury sedans. Handling is responsive and composed, and its easy-to-drive nature makes it accessible to any driver.

Acceleration4.5

The four-cylinder engine delivers smooth but average acceleration for the segment (0 to 60 mph in 8.1 seconds) and is paired to a nice, responsive CVT. For more thrust, the optional V6 engine's silky power returns class-leading acceleration.

Braking5.0

The brake pedal is easy to modulate and isn't overly grabby even at full effort. Hondas used to have some of the worst stopping distances, but not any more. The EX-L we tested stopped from 60 mph in 117 feet, which is commendable for the class.

Steering4.0

Steering is light in effort but feels precise and fluid in its movement. It doesn't offer as much feedback as Hondas of the past, but it feels natural to the point that you won't be thinking about the steering, which is a good thing.

Handling4.0

When you're driving around turns, the Accord keeps its composure, even if there are mid-corner bumps. The car rotates and pivots through corners if coaxed, and the front tires won't simply give up if you drive enthusiastically.

Drivability5.0

The four-cylinder and CVT pairing, usually a sore spot in other cars, is responsive to your demands. Sport shift mode will even maintain proper "gear" ratios as you'd expect. This is a paragon of being easy and pleasant to drive.

Comfort4.5

The Accord's comfort, quietness and overall refinement are standouts in the segment and may even give a few entry-level luxury cars a run for their money. The only area that it comes up a little short is the strength of its climate system. Otherwise it's likely to surpass many expectations.

Seat comfort4.0

The optional leather-covered front seats are firm and supportive during long drives. The cloth seat cushions are a touch softer but still provide good support. The modest side bolstering seems appropriate and non-confining for larger folks.

Ride comfort5.0

The Accord rides very comfortably and composed, even if you've got the big wheels and tires. Whether you're driving on rough roads or on the highway, the suspension feels at ease.

Noise & vibration4.0

Wind and road noise is impressively subdued. As a bonus, the four-cylinder's CVT doesn't cause droning noises they're typically known for. The V6 is smooth and quiet, with pleasingly sporty sounds at high rpm.

Climate control3.0

Air-conditioning proved weak on a hot day, or at least we found ourselves setting the automatic climate control about 7 degrees cooler to achieve the same level of comfort. Some other rival cars do it better.

Interior4.5

The Accord's cabin is an example of how to do it right. There's plenty of space, it's easy to get in and out, and the airy greenhouse provides a good view out for the driver and a roomy environment for passengers.

Ease of use3.0

The touchscreen interface found on most trims isn't very user-friendly, and the abundance of steering wheel buttons can be overwhelming on upper trims. Otherwise, the more basic controls are easy to figure out.

Getting in/getting out4.0

It's easier to access the Accord's rear seats than in some competitors that have sleeker, lower rooflines. The doors are large and light.

Driving position4.0

The eight-way power seats don't have as much rearward travel as in some other sedans, but only the tallest drivers will notice. The seat is mounted high, which helps improve visibility. We also like the steering column's wide range of adjustment.

Roominess5.0

The Accord has a large, airy cabin with plenty of room. A 6-foot-tall driver could sit behind himself with legroom to spare, and there's copious headroom. The rear seats also have a nice reclined seatback angle.

Visibility4.5

The LaneWatch camera is a unique approach to the blind-spot issue, though not everyone finds it useful. Thin upright pillars and large windows make forward visibility easy, even if some of the interior trim reflects glare. A rearview camera is standard.

Quality4.5

Interior materials are of solid quality compared to the best in the class, and it's all screwed together so well that it feels like it'll last for 100 years. There's even good value in top-level trims.

Utility4.0

The Honda Accord is among the class leaders in terms of utility, boasting a nice-sized trunk, abundant small item storage, and a big backseat for car seats and whatever else doesn't fit in back.

Small-item storage5.0

Two bins under the center stack are perfect for keeping a smartphone of whatever jumbo-size proportions Apple or Samsung comes up with next. Large, square cupholders hold a variety of containers but could benefit from better grip.

Cargo space3.0

The 15.5-cubic-foot trunk and its wide opening are average for the segment, meaning they are both really big. All Accords have a 60/40-split folding rear seat, with the exception of the base LX that has a one-piece.

Child safety seat accommodation4.0

LATCH points in outboard positions with three upper tether anchors. You may have to uncomfortably move the passenger seat up for some rear-facing seats, but most will fit well. Access is better than in most cars, but some midsize sedans are better.

Technology3.0

The number of electronic features available on most Accord trim levels is commendable, but the execution of those features needs work. In particular, the Honda Sensing package's various driver aids and the frustrating touchscreen found on most trim levels.

Audio & navigation2.0

The touchscreen found on most trim levels can be frustrating to use. Commonly used menu buttons are too small, and navigation between menus is confusing. There's no volume knob or direct radio tuning method, which means most rivals are much better.

Smartphone integration3.0

Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are present, but transitioning between their controls and those of the Honda-controlled systems is frustrating and confusing. Bluetooth pairing is easy for audio and phone.

Driver aids2.5

Adaptive cruise control is too quick to slam on the brakes, too slow to speed up and doesn't come to a full stop by itself. The collision warning is overly sensitive to the point we prefer it off. The lane departure system functions properly, without being too intrusive or bouncing between lines.

Voice control5.0

The superior voice controls at least serve as a good work-around for some of the other shortcomings. We successfully and easily entered two navigation addresses on the first try, requested a satellite radio station and made a phone call.

Edmunds expert review process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.