Used Accord for sale
List Price Range:$23,324 - $27,990
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Which Accord does Edmunds recommend?

While all of the Accord trims provide good value, there's one standout that we can wholeheartedly get behind. The Accord Sport sedan is one of the best deals in the business thanks to its healthy features roster and reasonable price. If you're with us in feeling lukewarm about the touchscreen, you're in luck — the Sport doesn't have it. You can even bolster the Sport's persona and get it with a manual transmission. As for the coupe, we'd spend a bit more and go with the Accord EX-L V6 coupe. Its features buff out the car's appeal, and the V6 brings some old-school Honda flavor to the mix.

Edmunds' Expert Review

  • Cabin is roomy and filled with stylish, soft-touch materials
  • Ride is comfortable on bumpy roads and on the highway
  • Engines provide impressive acceleration and fuel economy
  • Fun and sporty handling for a midsize car
  • Optional touchscreen interface is a source of constant frustration
  • Driver aids are overly sensitive, especially frontal collision warning
  • Fewer available luxury features than some in its class

Overall rating

4.0 / 5

Building on last year's significant updates, the 2017 Honda Accord should appeal whether you're prioritizing interior space, fuel economy, value or even an engaging driving experience. Read on to learn more why the Accord is a must-drive if you're shopping for a midsize sedan or coupe.

Following some notable revisions last year, the 2017 Honda Accord is essentially a carryover model, and an aging one at that, considering Honda last gave its Accord a full redesign for the 2013 model year. Even so, most of the midsize sedan segment is still playing catchup. The current Accord is arguably Honda at its finest. It scores highly in just about every category, and unlike many rivals, it's a genuine pleasure to drive. If you're looking for a family sedan that does it all, or perhaps a sporty yet still roomy coupe, the 2017 Accord's across-the-board excellence simply cannot be ignored.

2017 Honda Accord models

The front-wheel-drive 2017 Honda Accord is available in two body styles. Sedans come in LX, Sport, Sport Special Edition (Sport SE), EX, EX-L, EX-L V6 and Touring trims. Coupes are available in LX-S, EX, EX-L, EX-L V6 and Touring trims. Upgrading from one trim to the next gets you more features,  and we think the associated price bumps are appropriate given the upgrades you get. A suite of advanced safety systems called Honda Sensing is available on all trims except Touring (where it's standard), but our lackluster experiences with this system make it difficult to recommend.

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Starting with the sedans, the base LX is quite generously equipped and powered by a 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine (185 horsepower, 181 pound-feet) paired to a six-speed manual transmission or continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT). Feature highlights include 16-inch alloy wheels, dual-zone automatic climate control, a 7.7-inch central display (not to be confused with the touchscreen that's added on higher trims), Bluetooth, a rearview camera, a height-adjustable driver seat, a one-piece folding rear seat and a four-speaker sound system.

Opting for our favorite, the Sport, gets you a bit more power (189 hp, 182 lb-ft), 19-inch wheels, LED daytime running lights and foglights, cloth seating with imitation-leather bolsters, a power driver seat, a 60/40-split folding rear seat and a leather-wrapped steering wheel (with shift paddles if the automatic transmission is specified).

The Sport Special Edition is very similar to the regular Sport, but it adds special-edition badging, heated front seats and leather seats with red accent stitching.

The Accord EX also builds off the LX, but it focuses more on extra amenities than sportiness, adding 17-inch wheels, LED daytime running lights and foglights, heated mirrors, a sunroof, keyless ignition and entry, remote ignition (with the automatic transmission), the power driver seat,Honda's LaneWatch blind-spot camera system, a six-speaker sound system with a 7-inch touchscreen interface (the standard 7.7-inch display remains as well) and satellite and HD radio. Also standard is smartphone app integration via HondaLink (with smartphone-enabled Aha radio features), Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.

The EX-L trim comes with the CVT and adds leather upholstery, driver-seat memory functions, a power passenger seat, heated front seats, an auto-dimming rearview mirror and an upgraded seven-speaker sound system. As its name suggests, the EX-L V6 is powered by a 3.5-liter V6 (278 hp, 252 lb-ft) matched to a six-speed automatic.

All of the above trims can be outfitted with the Honda Sensing package, which includes adaptive cruise control, forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking, and lane departure warning and mitigation. A navigation system is optional for the EX-L and EX-L V6.

The range-topping Touring takes the EX-L V6 offerings and adds the features from the Honda Sensing package as well as 19-inch wheels, LED headlights (with automatic high-beam control), automatic wipers, front and rear parking sensors, a rear decklid spoiler, heated outboard rear seats and the navigation system.

For the Accord coupe, the base LX-S trim is similar to the LX sedan but adds 17-inch wheels and the six-speaker audio system. The coupe's EX, EX-L, EX-L V6 and Touring trims are also comparable to the sedan's in terms of equipment, though every EX variant gets 18-inch wheels (the Touring gets 19s). Note that all automatic-transmission coupes include standard paddle shifters.

Trim tested

Each vehicle typically comes in multiple versions, although trim levels share many aspects. The ratings in this review are based on our full test of the 2016 Honda Accord EX-L (2.4L 4-cyl.; CVT automatic).

EdmundsScorecard

Overall4.0 / 5
Driving4.5
Comfort4.5
Interior4.5
Utility4.0
Technology3.0

Driving

4.5
The 2017 Honda Accord is a top-performing family sedan. Acceleration and braking are among the segment best with the V6 model being quicker than many base model luxury sedans. Handling is responsive and composed, and its easy-to-drive nature makes it accessible to any driver.

Acceleration

4.5
The four-cylinder engine delivers smooth but average acceleration for the segment (0 to 60 mph in 8.1 seconds) and is paired to a nice, responsive CVT. For more thrust, the optional V6 engine's silky power returns class-leading acceleration.

Braking

5.0
The brake pedal is easy to modulate and isn't overly grabby even at full effort. Hondas used to have some of the worst stopping distances, but not any more. The EX-L we tested stopped from 60 mph in 117 feet, which is commendable for the class.

Steering

4.0
Steering is light in effort but feels precise and fluid in its movement. It doesn't offer as much feedback as Hondas of the past, but it feels natural to the point that you won't be thinking about the steering, which is a good thing.

Handling

4.0
When you're driving around turns, the Accord keeps its composure, even if there are mid-corner bumps. The car rotates and pivots through corners if coaxed, and the front tires won't simply give up if you drive enthusiastically.

Drivability

5.0
The four-cylinder and CVT pairing, usually a sore spot in other cars, is responsive to your demands. Sport shift mode will even maintain proper "gear" ratios as you'd expect. This is a paragon of being easy and pleasant to drive.

Comfort

4.5
The Accord's comfort, quietness and overall refinement are standouts in the segment and may even give a few entry-level luxury cars a run for their money. The only area that it comes up a little short is the strength of its climate system. Otherwise it's likely to surpass many expectations.

Seat comfort

4.0
The optional leather-covered front seats are firm and supportive during long drives. The cloth seat cushions are a touch softer but still provide good support. The modest side bolstering seems appropriate and non-confining for larger folks.

Ride comfort

5.0
The Accord rides very comfortably and composed, even if you've got the big wheels and tires. Whether you're driving on rough roads or on the highway, the suspension feels at ease.

Noise & vibration

4.0
Wind and road noise is impressively subdued. As a bonus, the four-cylinder's CVT doesn't cause droning noises they're typically known for. The V6 is smooth and quiet, with pleasingly sporty sounds at high rpm.

Climate control

3.0
Air-conditioning proved weak on a hot day, or at least we found ourselves setting the automatic climate control about 7 degrees cooler to achieve the same level of comfort. Some other rival cars do it better.

Interior

4.5
The Accord's cabin is an example of how to do it right. There's plenty of space, it's easy to get in and out, and the airy greenhouse provides a good view out for the driver and a roomy environment for passengers.

Ease of use

3.0
The touchscreen interface found on most trims isn't very user-friendly, and the abundance of steering wheel buttons can be overwhelming on upper trims. Otherwise, the more basic controls are easy to figure out.

Getting in/getting out

4.0
It's easier to access the Accord's rear seats than in some competitors that have sleeker, lower rooflines. The doors are large and light.

Driving position

4.0
The eight-way power seats don't have as much rearward travel as in some other sedans, but only the tallest drivers will notice. The seat is mounted high, which helps improve visibility. We also like the steering column's wide range of adjustment.

Roominess

5.0
The Accord has a large, airy cabin with plenty of room. A 6-foot-tall driver could sit behind himself with legroom to spare, and there's copious headroom. The rear seats also have a nice reclined seatback angle.

Visibility

4.5
The LaneWatch camera is a unique approach to the blind-spot issue, though not everyone finds it useful. Thin upright pillars and large windows make forward visibility easy, even if some of the interior trim reflects glare. A rearview camera is standard.

Quality

4.5
Interior materials are of solid quality compared to the best in the class, and it's all screwed together so well that it feels like it'll last for 100 years. There's even good value in top-level trims.

Utility

4.0
The Honda Accord is among the class leaders in terms of utility, boasting a nice-sized trunk, abundant small item storage, and a big backseat for car seats and whatever else doesn't fit in back.

Small-item storage

5.0
Two bins under the center stack are perfect for keeping a smartphone of whatever jumbo-size proportions Apple or Samsung comes up with next. Large, square cupholders hold a variety of containers but could benefit from better grip.

Cargo space

3.0
The 15.5-cubic-foot trunk and its wide opening are average for the segment, meaning they are both really big. All Accords have a 60/40-split folding rear seat, with the exception of the base LX that has a one-piece.

Child safety seat accommodation

4.0
LATCH points in outboard positions with three upper tether anchors. You may have to uncomfortably move the passenger seat up for some rear-facing seats, but most will fit well. Access is better than in most cars, but some midsize sedans are better.

Technology

3.0
The number of electronic features available on most Accord trim levels is commendable, but the execution of those features needs work. In particular, the Honda Sensing package's various driver aids and the frustrating touchscreen found on most trim levels.

Audio & navigation

2.0
The touchscreen found on most trim levels can be frustrating to use. Commonly used menu buttons are too small, and navigation between menus is confusing. There's no volume knob or direct radio tuning method, which means most rivals are much better.

Smartphone integration

3.0
Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are present, but transitioning between their controls and those of the Honda-controlled systems is frustrating and confusing. Bluetooth pairing is easy for audio and phone.

Driver aids

2.5
Adaptive cruise control is too quick to slam on the brakes, too slow to speed up and doesn't come to a full stop by itself. The collision warning is overly sensitive to the point we prefer it off. The lane departure system functions properly, without being too intrusive or bouncing between lines.

Voice control

5.0
The superior voice controls at least serve as a good work-around for some of the other shortcomings. We successfully and easily entered two navigation addresses on the first try, requested a satellite radio station and made a phone call.

Consumer reviews

Read what other owners think about the Used 2017 Honda Accord.

Trending topics in reviews

Most helpful consumer reviews

4 out of 5 stars
So far, so good
Jason Green,09/24/2016
EX w/Honda Sensing 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl CVT)
I've owned this vehicle for seven months now, and so far it seems to be a good investment. Driving is easy, and acceleration is very smooth: engine RPMs barely get above 3k when accelerating from a stop light, and the car gets up to speed easily with very little struggle (compared to my previous 2013 hybrid that red lined while accelerating to 45 mph). The interior is very quiet and comfortable with good visibility. Love the Honda sensing with the camera on the passenger side - very helpful when passing vehicles on the highway or making sure you're parking close enough to the curb. I wish I had a camera on the driver's side as well! Adaptive cruise control works great - the furthest distance setting provides a very comfortable 3-second following range which is a bit far in some driving situations. The closest distance setting is also comfortable, giving about a one-second following distance. Love the lane keeping system - when off, it gives you a visual warning when you are departing your lane; when on, it helps to gently guide you to the center of your lane - the car almost drives by itself! And the lane departure is a gentle reminder - some cars I test drove nagged at you when you started to leave your lane, and the loud notification beeps were quite distracting. It has pretty good smartphone integration - if I plug my Android phone into the USB port, I can use Google navigation that's on my phone (and it automatically shows up on the console screen) - that saved me a few hundred bucks since I didn't have to buy the trim with navigation (and Google maps is generally more user-friendly than most car navigation systems). I also have access to music on my phone and Amazon music. You can also use Pandora or other streaming services or use Honda's "A-Ha" music app. I can get phone calls through the car speakers, and the system will even read texts & give me the option to provide a voice reply. Android Auto will also read my emails to me once the vehicle is parked. Overall, very good technology and integration that I've only just begun to explore. Other notes: - Fold down rear seats are only operable from the trunk, and you can't access the trunk from the back seat. This provides the opportunity to securely lock the trunk so the valet driver can't get in without the key. You can also lock out the glove compartment so you need the physical key to get in. - Rear seat room is comfortable, even for a 6'3" adult. - This trim level has two center dashboard screens - the upper screen cycles between music info, trip info, or an uploaded photo & clock. You also have the option to combine music info and trip info on the same screen. The lower touch screen displays music, cell phone, Android Auto features (e.g. navigation) & trip info (trip mph and duration, including previous trips) - seems a bit redundant though to have some of the same info displayed on both the upper and lower screens. - Below the bottom touch screen are simple, easy to operate dual-zone climate controls that keep the passenger compartment very comfortable. - Car has a number of driving modes. The transmission itself has "Drive" and "S" (which I assume means "Sport," but it's not defined in the owner's manual as such). "S" gives a little more power for faster starts, probably at the expense of fuel economy at highway speeds. "S" is also used for models with paddle shifters, for towing, for increased engine braking, or in hilly terrain. Drive, I assume, gives you the advertised 185 hp and 181 ft-lbs torque. You also have an "Econ" button: Econ mode restricts both the climate system and engine power to maximize fuel economy. The A/C doesn't blow as hard, and it takes a bit longer to cool the vehicle on warm days. I suppose you could drive in Sport mode with Econ activated, but it seems like it would be counter productive. I generally leave the car in drive with Econ mode activated, and it seems to do fine, even on the hottest summer days. I've had no problem with acceleration or speed while in Econ mode, though I've noticed that with cruise control on, the vehicle slows a bit when going up hills, and it doesn't return to the ordered speed as aggressively. I suppose if you want something a little more responsive, either don't use Econ mode, drive with the transmission in "Sport," or buy the V-6 or sport model. With about 5000 miles on the car, I'm getting about the advertised 30 combined mpg (advertised at 27/36 mpg & 30 mpg combined). Most of my driving is on the highway, and I've seem mpg up to 42 mpg. Yesterday, I turned off Econ mode and still got 36 mpg highway. Overall, a very good mid-size sedan. While it doesn't have all the luxury features that are out there, it is very well equipped, and very well made. And if buying a domestic vehicle is on your agenda, my previous Ford was built in Mexico, but this Honda was built in Ohio. I probably put more groceries on tables in America with this car purchase than with my "domestic" Ford.
5 out of 5 stars
Comfortable, agile, manual transmission sedan
Nicholas Keen,06/11/2017
Sport 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl 6M)
The 2017 Accord doesn't have the most powerful engine at this trim level, but the slightly gruff, very responsive character of the non-turbocharged 4-cylinder has won me over. The engine loves to rev, feels alive and is your friend for a fast drive, as is the handling which is agile and sure footed as long as you feed the car some power through fast corners -- if you lift off or are timid with it, it can feel a bit twitchy and nervous. On balance I'd much sooner have this car with its absence of electronic add-ons than an option-laden front-heavy V6 that is great for freeway acceleration but doesn't have the balance of a four and is lumbered with an automatic transmission. Having come from European and U.S brands, it was refreshing to get into a new car and have simply nothing wrong with it. Best points: engine performance; handling; steering; reliability; the standard halogen headlights are very effective -- really as good as HIDs; value for money; passenger space; San Marino Red color. Worst points, minor stuff but: stereo sounds boxy and tinny with a treble bias that can't really be dialed out (lessons to be learned from GM's ability to get decent balanced sound from a modest system); Bluetooth radio streaming sometimes fails -- may be the iPhone at fault; I'm no doubt in the minority on this but I would prefer a fully manual climate control system -- this one does not seem good at holding a comfortable temperature and airflow volume in winter when set to full auto with a setting of, say, 72 degrees (but summer A/C performance seems strong). Overall, this car does pretty much everything I care about very well and I am glad I bought it. Update at 10K miles: The car is still performing flawlessly. The manual transmission is sweet and intuitive. I recently had the opportunity to drive an LX with CVT. It was a different car entirely, well made but a bit lacking in character and the handling did not have the edge that the Sport's has. I expect that C&D is right: the Sport with manual is the sweet spot in the range. I drive a lot of country roads in winter and headlight performance matters. I feel as comfortable with the Accord's halogens as I did with the HIDs in my old BWW 325i. There is plenty of light to the sides of the road and the high beams flood the road with light. That's thoughtful design and carefully, rigorously tested implementation that many others in the U.S. market do not seem to bother themselves with. Update at 15,000 miles: one issue so far. Rear defog had one bad element, associated with poor FM radio reception when switched on. Rear window replaced under warranty, issue fixed.
5 out of 5 stars
Best Buy for 4 bangers!
Tswv Yeej,10/14/2016
Sport Special Edition 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl CVT)
Design is appealing and slick, turns heads. Interior looks/feels rich. Instrument well designed, with balanced brightness at night. Headlights sufficient brightness, taillights gorgeous at night. Leather Seats are comfortable and easy to adjust (power mode), seats warmer both side (driver/passenger). Stereo volume sufficient, controls on steering wheel makes it effortless to control/adjust/change channel. Leather wrapped steering wheel feels rich and smooth. Cabin is roomy front/back, trunk sufficient space. Ride is average "S" mode makes car glue on road, increase engine response which translates for faster acceleration. Small wind noise at center of driver side window at 65+ mph. Engine super quiet at idle and roars at high rpm. Transmission shifting super smooth, unnoticeable. Great gas mileage. Overall, car is best buy in my book.
4 out of 5 stars
Close to Perfection
Matthew Whitaker,06/08/2017
Touring V-6 4dr Sedan (3.5L 6cyl 6A)
This is my second 9th gen Accord Touring, so I'm obviously a fan of Honda and this iteration of Accord. The 2017 9.5 gen is even more refined than my 2014, with a smoother operating engine that has more seamless VCM transitions between 3 and 6 cylinders, more supple ride quality due to the reactive amplitude dampers and revised rear bushings, vastly improved and updated infotainment system with Apple CarPlay, improved, more eye-catching styling, Honda Sensing safety features, and additional luxury features, such as rain-sensing wipers, full LED headlights with auto LED highbeams and heated rear seats. In Lunar Silver Metallic with deeply tinted windows, the car often attracts compliments. The acceleration is outstanding and the J-series V6 is a real gem: one of Ward's Best engines for 2014, it's smooth and rev-happy, with a mean, intoxicatingly joyous sound when worked hard into VTEC range (5100 rpm). It makes higher trim Accords feel like a completely different beast than those powered with i4s and CVTs. If there's any downside, it would have to be the POS Continental ProContact tires that Honda has chosen for models with 19" wheels. Too narrow in both width and sidewall, the tires explode at seemingly the tiniest impact, which is probably one of the reasons why such a reliable automaker now has a roadside assistance program. Having owned my 2017 for 6 months, I speak from experience as I have now had 3 blowouts since December 2016. At $362/tire, premature replacement of tires due to blowouts has to be the largest, if only downside to my ownership experience thus far. UPDATE (June 2020): At 3.5 years and 42K miles, our Accord has been trouble-free, save for the fuel pump recall that was performed at the dealer under warranty, and routine oil and filter changes. We had the brake and transmission fluids changed prior to the Maintenance Minder's recommendation, as the former is required at 3 years and we regarded the latter as a precautionary measure. Although the tires weren't worn, the OEM tires were replaced with 245/40/19 Continental DWS06 tires, which improved handling and winter traction. Other than that, we have continue to consider the Accord a sound value and purchase and we enjoy having the vehicle in our household.

Safety

Our experts like the Accord models:

Forward Collision Warning
Warns you when you are approaching the vehicle in front too quickly.
Collision Mitigation Braking System
Helps prevent collisions by working with forward collision warning and automatically applying brakes if no driver intervention is detected.
Honda LaneWatch
Reveals vehicles in the passenger-side blind spot by activating a rear-facing camera and displaying the image on the central touchscreen.

NHTSA Overall Rating

5 out of 5 stars
The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration offers independent analysis.
  • Frontal Barrier Crash Rating
    Overall4 / 5
    Driver4 / 5
    Passenger4 / 5
  • Side Crash Rating
    Overall5 / 5
  • Side Barrier Rating
    Overall5 / 5
    Driver5 / 5
    Passenger5 / 5
  • Combined Side Barrier & Pole Ratings
    Front Seat5 / 5
    Back Seat5 / 5
  • Rollover
    Rollover5 / 5
    Dynamic Test ResultNo Tip
    Risk Of Rollover9.9%
IIHS Rating
The Insurance Institute of Highway Safety uses extensive crash tests to determine car safety.
  • Side Impact Test
    Good
  • Roof Strength Test
    Good
  • Rear Crash Protection / Head Restraint
    Good
  • IIHS Small Overlap Front Test
    Not Tested
  • Moderate Overlap Front Test
    Good

More about the 2017 Honda Accord

Used 2017 Honda Accord Overview

The Used 2017 Honda Accord is offered in the following submodels: Accord Sedan, Accord Coupe. Available styles include LX 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl CVT), Sport 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl CVT), Sport Special Edition 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl CVT), EX-L 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl CVT), EX 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl CVT), Touring V-6 4dr Sedan (3.5L 6cyl 6A), EX-L V-6 4dr Sedan (3.5L 6cyl 6A), EX-L 4dr Sedan w/Navigation and Honda Sensing (2.4L 4cyl CVT), EX-L V-6 4dr Sedan w/Navigation and Honda Sensing (3.5L 6cyl 6A), Sport 4dr Sedan w/Honda Sensing (2.4L 4cyl CVT), Touring V-6 2dr Coupe (3.5L 6cyl 6A), EX-L 2dr Coupe (2.4L 4cyl CVT), EX-L V-6 2dr Coupe (3.5L 6cyl 6A), LX-S 2dr Coupe w/Honda Sensing (2.4L 4cyl CVT), LX 4dr Sedan w/Honda Sensing (2.4L 4cyl CVT), EX 4dr Sedan w/Honda Sensing (2.4L 4cyl CVT), EX 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl 6M), EX-L 2dr Coupe w/Navigation and Honda Sensing (2.4L 4cyl CVT), Sport 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl 6M), LX-S 2dr Coupe (2.4L 4cyl 6M), EX 2dr Coupe (2.4L 4cyl CVT), Sport Special Edition 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl 6M), LX 4dr Sedan (2.4L 4cyl 6M), EX 2dr Coupe (2.4L 4cyl 6M), EX-L V-6 2dr Coupe (3.5L 6cyl 6M), EX-L V-6 2dr Coupe w/Navigation and Honda Sensing (3.5L 6cyl 6A), EX 2dr Coupe w/Honda Sensing (2.4L 4cyl CVT), and LX-S 2dr Coupe (2.4L 4cyl CVT). Pre-owned Honda Accord models are available with a 2.4 L-liter gas engine, with output up to 189 hp, depending on engine type. The Used 2017 Honda Accord comes with front wheel drive. Available transmissions include: continuously variable-speed automatic. The Used 2017 Honda Accord comes with a 3 yr./ 36000 mi. basic warranty, a 3 yr./ 36000 mi. roadside warranty, and a 5 yr./ 60000 mi. powertrain warranty.

What's a good price on a Used 2017 Honda Accord?

Price comparisons for Used 2017 Honda Accord trim styles:

  • The Used 2017 Honda Accord LX is priced between $11,491 and$33,990 with odometer readings between 11836 and195648 miles.
  • The Used 2017 Honda Accord Sport is priced between $16,500 and$34,990 with odometer readings between 22872 and146715 miles.
  • The Used 2017 Honda Accord Sport Special Edition is priced between $15,000 and$24,998 with odometer readings between 22767 and101989 miles.
  • The Used 2017 Honda Accord EX is priced between $19,800 and$25,590 with odometer readings between 10063 and80068 miles.
  • The Used 2017 Honda Accord EX-L is priced between $18,000 and$26,998 with odometer readings between 22235 and147341 miles.
  • The Used 2017 Honda Accord Touring V-6 is priced between $19,983 and$29,998 with odometer readings between 11658 and109105 miles.
  • The Used 2017 Honda Accord EX-L V-6 is priced between $18,991 and$22,188 with odometer readings between 78102 and105526 miles.

Shop with Edmunds for perks and special offers on used cars, trucks, and SUVs near Ashburn, VA. Doing so could save you hundreds or thousands of dollars. Edmunds also provides consumer-driven dealership sales and service reviews to help you make informed decisions about what cars to buy and where to buy them.

Which used 2017 Honda Accords are available in my area?

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2017 Honda Accord for sale near. There are currently 125 used and CPO 2017 Accords listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $11,491 and mileage as low as 10063 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a used car from our massive database to find cheap prew-owned vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the Used 2017 Honda Accord.

Can't find a used 2017 Honda Accords you want in your area? Consider a broader search.

Find a used Honda Accord for sale - 8 great deals out of 24 listings starting at $20,998.

Find a used Honda for sale - 7 great deals out of 24 listings starting at $13,749.

Find a used certified pre-owned Honda Accord for sale - 1 great deals out of 12 listings starting at $13,613.

Find a used certified pre-owned Honda for sale - 6 great deals out of 22 listings starting at $20,197.

Should I lease or buy a 2017 Honda Accord?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

Check out Honda lease specials
Check out Honda Accord lease specials