Used 2001 Honda Accord Review

No question as to why the Accord is one of the top-selling cars in America. It's simply good.




what's new

Freshened exterior styling debuts on the 2001 Honda Accord, with a more aggressive-looking front fascia and hood and a new taillight design. Honda also ups the safety features list, making dual-stage, dual-threshold front airbags standard and side airbags available on all models. All Accords now either meet or exceed California's low-emission vehicle (LEV) standards (some Accords meet ULEV standards, and one model sold in California is rated SULEV). Improvements aimed at reducing road and wind noise have been made, while EX models get a standard in-dash six-disc CD changer, and all V6 models come with traction control. Midyear, a DX four-banger equipped with a special value package debuted, adding an automatic transmission, air conditioning, a CD player, floor mats, fake wood interior accents and special exterior trim.

vehicle overview

The benchmark. The best-selling car in America. The highest resale value in its class. These are all statements that have been made with regularity concerning the Honda Accord, a vehicle that is always on the short list of the most popular cars in this country. The Accord won a loyal base of customers by offering notable performance, room for four, frugal fuel economy and a virtual guarantee that, if cared for properly, it would not break.

This sixth-generation Accord is available in coupe and sedan bodies, equipped with basic DX (sedan only), mid-grade LX, or loaded EX trim. The standard 2.3-liter four-banger in the DX Sedan is worth 135 horses. LX and EX models come with a VTEC (Variable Valve Timing and Lift Electronic Control) engine, in your choice of 2.3-liter four-cylinder (which generates 150 horsepower) or 3.0-liter V6 (200 horsepower) configurations.

The spunky fours can be mated to a slick-shifting manual or four-speed automatic transmission driving the front wheels. The V6, available only with the automatic, is a model of refinement, revving smoothly and silently.

Now that we've praised the living daylights out of this car, here's some bad news: The low price of the DX is accompanied by a low level of equipment. Also, the Accord is easy to drive, but it doesn't reward the driver much for the efforts. You won't mistake this for a performance car -- look to the Nissan Maxima for competent canyon carving. The Accord is suited more to daily driving in the urban jungle, featuring decent acceleration, strong brakes and light, effortless steering.

As with the Toyota Camry, refinement and attention to detail are the Accord's strengths. Almost all interior materials are pleasing to the eye and touch, and are assembled with great care. Gap tolerances are about half what you'd find in competing American products. Storage room abounds; the Accord mimics a minivan with so many places to stash maps, drinks, change, and assorted detritus. Spacious, comfortable and quiet, the Accord will tote many happy campers for miles on end as long as they don't mind the stiff highway ride. The seats are comfortable, both front and rear, and ergonomics are nearly flawless.

While not exactly spicy, the Honda Accord is the definitive family sedan or personal coupe. A low price, a high level of refinement, a cavernous interior, and a well-deserved reputation for reliability put the Accord at the top of the heap. Even a loaded EX V6 model with leather, alloy wheels, power moonroof, automatic climate control, CD player, premium sound, and steering-wheel radio controls struggles to surpass the $25,000 mark. Accord is the benchmark by which all other midsize cars are measured.

edmunds expert review process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.