2021 Honda Accord

MSRP range: $24,770 - $36,700
4.4 out of 5 stars(48)
MSRP$25,785
Edmunds suggests you pay$26,504
Low supply is pushing the market average above MSRP.

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2021 Honda Accord video

MARK TAKAHASHI: Honda, that beacon of reliability and practicality. And they've had a few fun models sprinkled in there over the years, too. Kia, the new kid on the block by comparison. They've taken on the establishment and won. The Kia K5 just stole the Edmunds top rated crown away from the Honda Accord in the midsize sedan class. But family sedans are boring, right? Or are they? What we have here are these sporty versions of the two top rated sedans in the class. The key a K5 GT, and the Honda Accord Sport, as determined to our exhaustive and thorough testing procedures. For the sake of simplicity, we're leaving off the Mazda 6 and Toyota Camry TRD, well that and we couldn't get a Camry TRD. I mean, do they have any idea who I think I am? If you want to see a showdown with those, leave a comment below. In this video, we're concentrating more on the performance aspects of these sedans. If you want more in-depth information on things like comfort and convenience, we have links to videos below that will give you all the information you need. But this is the fun zone. As always, head over to edmunds.com for all your car shopping needs. And to get a cash offer on your vehicle, head to edmands.com/sellmycar. Let's get the specs out of the way first. The Honda Accord Sport with the top powertrain in the Accord lineup starts just above $33,000 and comes with a 2 liter, turbo charged four cylinder that makes 252 horsepower and 273 pound feet of torque. That's paired with a 10-speed automatic. Want some bonus points? That's a detuned version of the same engine that's in the Honda Civic Type R. The Kia K5 GT costs about $2,000 less and gets a 2.5 liter turbo. That puts out 290 horsepower and 311 pound feet of torque. That's mated with an eight-speed dual clutch automatic. But the Kia K5 GT goes further with a sport-tuned suspension, upgraded brakes, and steering. Seems like you get more with the GT, right? That already sounds like the Kia K5 GT enjoys an insurmountable advantage over the Accord. But keep in mind, the Accord already gets high marks for its sporty handling. On top of that, we need to find out how all of these changes affect the K5's driveability and comfort. Both of these are offered only in front wheel drive, which leads me to question whether or not those front tires can handle all this added performance. Supporting K5 models are offered with all wheel drive and the smaller engine, which is a bonus for those who live in weather prone areas. Tires are vitally important, too, and the K5 gets 245 Pirelli P0 all-season tires mounted on 19-inch wheels, while the Accord Sport gets 235 Michelin primacy MXM-4's also mounted on 19s. Thankfully, we're at the Edmunds test track where I can safely explore the potential of these more than mild but less than wild sedans. So let's go turn and burn. [TIRES SCREECHING] Despite having a traditional automatic transmission, the Accord has very slight pause between the time you get on the pedal and when you finally start to take off. This really isn't that big of a deal these days. I mean, a lot of cars do that. But it does make it feel just a little less responsive. It hits 0 to 60 in 5.9 seconds which is quick for the class, especially when you consider that the regular record does it in about 8 seconds. It sounds OK at full throttle, at least it doesn't sound like you're going to break anything. As I'm heading into this next hairpin, I'll get on the brakes hard, but not pushing it through the firewall. The thing is though, I'm trying to downshift into second gear and it won't let me do it until I'm halfway through the turn, even though I know I have the revs there. It's frustrating. I like getting all my breaking in downshifting done just before I turn in, and it keeps the car a little more settled all the way through. Now in this turn, body roll, it is certainly there. But the Accord is still pretty well-mannered. It doesn't encourage you to drive it any harder, mostly because it feels like you're not going to get anything else out of it. This is an Accord Sport, after all. It's not something like an Accord Type R. Ooh. Accord Type R. I could get behind something like that. Tire howl it is definitely there. But it gives you a good indication of how much grip you have left. Is it fun? Yeah, reasonably it is. But what happens if I turn up the aggression just a little bit? Let's find out. Oh, yeah. Front and plows really hard. I lose all the grip up front, and I have to back out of the throttle just because there's nothing left I can pull from those poor tires. All right. That's enough. I'm going to cool it down, head back to pit. One thing I noticed pulling into the pits, the Accord, on the brakes, they were steaming. There were really, really hot. So that's one thing to keep in mind, especially because I wasn't really truly torturing them that much. The Kia K5 GT has upgraded rotors and calipers, so it's possible those brakes might not have as much of a problem. We shall see. Right off the line, the K5 GT has a distinct pause before you start getting any acceleration. On top of that, there are some awkward lurches as the dual clutch transmission tries to settle in and get you a higher gear. It's much less of an issue if you slap it over to manual mode. But in the everyday drive and commute, it can get pretty tiresome. I do like the engine sound better in the K5. Down low, it has this subtle little flutter, something that you might expect from a Subaru Boxer engine. But higher up, it gets smoother and a little more pronounced. As far as brakes go, well, there's not a whole lot to say there about feel. And again, that's a good thing. They do seem less prone to overheating than the Accord, but the unfortunate thing is it took 134 feet to come to a stop from 60 miles an hour. That is not very good. Coming into these sharper turns, I am able to grab second gear quicker than in the Accord. Allows it to rev up a little higher. The sport tuned suspension does a much better job of managing body role. It just feels a lot more planted. And neither car have much in the way of steering feedback. But at least in the K5 GT, you can switch it to Sport Plus Mode. It gives you a little more effort, at least it feels the part. As I get back into the throttle, the fun, it just dies. Yeah, ugh. Yeah. With the added power, it's much easier to overwhelm those front tires, and it feels like you have to be a lot more careful about that than in the Accord. It's a clear case that this car would greatly benefit from stickier tires or limited slip differential, and definitely all wheel drive. As it is, you have to baby the K5 GT out of turns. And that's the big letdown. Up until that point, it's pretty damn good. Once you can lay that power down, the ups are so quick, power is plentiful. I like the way the transmission works when I'm driving it hard like this, but in the everyday commute it kind of falls apart. It seems the opposite with the Accord, where it's smoother in everyday driving and a little too conservative for spirited driving. As for ride quality, I feel the bumps more than I would in the Accord or a regular K5, but it's nothing close to what I'd consider harsh. I think it's a good mix of sporty stiffness and comfortable compliance. In fact, I'd like to see a sport tuned suspension in the Accord Sport. [TIRES SCREECHING] At the end of this test, I'm somewhat surprised. I probably expected more from the Kia K5 GT and a little less from the Honda Accord Sport. Even more surprising, I'd take a supporting K5 with all wheel drive over either of these. It's a clear cut case that more power doesn't always equate to a better or sportier car. Fortunately, all the things that make the K5 our top-rated sedan remain. It's comfortable. It's a joy to drive. It's packed with tech, and you get a lot for your money. That said, if your budget can swing it, I suggest stepping up to the Kia Stinger or Dodge Charger, if you're serious about fun. And let me know if you want to see that comparison, because I sure as hell want to shoot it. Thanks for watching, and as always hit that Subscribe button below. I'm going to try and squeeze in a few more laps before they kick us out. See you. [MUSIC PLAYING]

Honda Accord Sport vs. Kia K5 GT Comparison Test | Which Sport Sedan Is Best? | Price, Specs & More


FAQ

Is the Honda Accord a good car?

The Edmunds experts tested the 2021 Accord both on the road and at the track, giving it a 8.3 out of 10. You probably care about Honda Accord fuel economy, so it's important to know that the Accord gets an EPA-estimated 26 mpg to 33 mpg, depending on the configuration. What about cargo capacity? When you're thinking about carrying stuff in your new car, keep in mind that the Accord has 16.7 cubic feet of trunk space. And then there's safety and reliability. Edmunds has all the latest NHTSA and IIHS crash-test scores, plus industry-leading expert and consumer reviews to help you understand what it's like to own and maintain a Honda Accord. Learn more

What's new in the 2021 Honda Accord?

According to Edmunds’ car experts, here’s what’s new for the 2021 Honda Accord:

  • Updated front-end styling
  • Revised trim level lineup
  • Newly available wireless Android Auto and Apple CarPlay
  • Manual transmission no longer available
  • Part of the 10th Accord generation introduced for 2018
Learn more

Is the Honda Accord reliable?

To determine whether the Honda Accord is reliable, read Edmunds' authentic consumer reviews, which come from real owners and reveal what it's like to live with the Accord. Look for specific complaints that keep popping up in the reviews, and be sure to compare the Accord's average consumer rating to that of competing vehicles. Learn more

Is the 2021 Honda Accord a good car?

There's a lot to consider if you're wondering whether the 2021 Honda Accord is a good car. Edmunds' expert testing team reviewed the 2021 Accord and gave it a 8.3 out of 10. Safety scores, fuel economy, cargo capacity and feature availability should all be factors in determining whether the 2021 Accord is a good car for you. Learn more

How much should I pay for a 2021 Honda Accord?

The least-expensive 2021 Honda Accord is the 2021 Honda Accord LX 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT). Including destination charge, it arrives with a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of about $24,770.

Other versions include:

  • EX-L 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT) which starts at $31,090
  • Sport Special Edition 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT) which starts at $28,720
  • Sport 4dr Sedan (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 10A) which starts at $31,910
  • Touring 4dr Sedan (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 10A) which starts at $36,700
  • Sport 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT) which starts at $27,230
  • LX 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT) which starts at $24,770
Learn more

What are the different models of Honda Accord?

If you're interested in the Honda Accord, the next question is, which Accord model is right for you? Accord variants include EX-L 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT), Sport Special Edition 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT), Sport 4dr Sedan (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 10A), and Touring 4dr Sedan (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 10A). For a full list of Accord models, check out Edmunds’ Features & Specs page. Learn more

More about the 2021 Honda Accord

2021 Honda Accord Overview

The 2021 Honda Accord is offered in the following submodels: Accord Sedan. Available styles include EX-L 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT), Sport 4dr Sedan (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 10A), Sport Special Edition 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT), Touring 4dr Sedan (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 10A), Sport 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT), and LX 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT). Honda Accord models are available with a 1.5 L-liter gas engine or a 2.0 L-liter gas engine, with output up to 252 hp, depending on engine type. The 2021 Honda Accord comes with front wheel drive. Available transmissions include: continuously variable-speed automatic, 10-speed shiftable automatic. The 2021 Honda Accord comes with a 3 yr./ 36000 mi. basic warranty, a 3 yr./ 36000 mi. roadside warranty, and a 5 yr./ 60000 mi. powertrain warranty.

What do people think of the 2021 Honda Accord?

Consumer ratings and reviews are also available for the 2021 Honda Accord and all its trim types. Overall, Edmunds users rate the 2021 Accord 4.4 on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. Edmunds consumer reviews allow users to sift through aggregated consumer reviews to understand what other drivers are saying about any vehicle in our database. Detailed rating breakdowns (including performance, comfort, value, interior, exterior design, build quality, and reliability) are available as well to provide shoppers with a comprehensive understanding of why customers like the 2021 Accord.

Edmunds Expert Reviews

Edmunds experts have compiled a robust series of ratings and reviews for the 2021 Honda Accord and all model years in our database. Our rich content includes expert reviews and recommendations for the 2021 Accord featuring deep dives into trim levels and features, performance, mpg, safety, interior, and driving. Edmunds also offers expert ratings, road test and performance data, long-term road tests, first-drive reviews, video reviews and more.

Our Review Process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.

What's a good price for a New 2021 Honda Accord?

2021 Honda Accord LX 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT)

Available Inventory:

We are showing 8 2021 Honda Accord LX 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Honda Accord Sport 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT)

Available Inventory:

We are showing 13 2021 Honda Accord Sport 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Honda Accord Sport Special Edition 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT)

Available Inventory:

We are showing 15 2021 Honda Accord Sport Special Edition 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Honda Accord EX-L 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT)

Available Inventory:

We are showing 16 2021 Honda Accord EX-L 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Honda Accord Touring 4dr Sedan (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 10A)

Available Inventory:

We are showing 6 2021 Honda Accord Touring 4dr Sedan (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 10A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

Which 2021 Honda Accords are available in my area?

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2021 Honda Accord for sale near. There are currently 95 new 2021 Accords listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $24,970 and mileage as low as 0 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a car from our massive database to find cheap vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the 2021 Honda Accord. Then select Edmunds special offers, perks, deals, and incentives to contact the dealer of your choice and save up to $1,954 on a used or CPO 2021 Accord available from a dealership near you.

Can't find a new 2021 Honda Accords you want in your area? Consider a broader search.

Find a new Honda for sale - 9 great deals out of 10 listings starting at $22,639.

Why trust Edmunds?

Edmunds has deep data on over 6 million new, used, and certified pre-owned vehicles, including rich, trim-level features and specs information like: MSRP, average price paid, warranty information (basic, drivetrain, and maintenance), features (upholstery, bluetooth, navigation, heated seating, cooled seating, cruise control, parking assistance, keyless ignition, satellite radio, folding rears seats ,run flat tires, wheel type, tire size, wheel tire, sunroof, etc.), vehicle specifications (engine cylinder count, drivetrain, engine power, engine torque, engine displacement, transmission), fuel economy (city, highway, combined, fuel capacity, range), vehicle dimensions (length, width, seating capacity, cargo space), car safety, true cost to own. Edmunds also provides tools to allow shopper to compare vehicles to similar models of their choosing by warranty, interior features, exterior features, specifications, fuel economy, vehicle dimensions, consumer rating, edmunds rating, and color.

What is the MPG of a 2021 Honda Accord?

2021 Honda Accord EX-L 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT), continuously variable-speed automatic, regular unleaded
33 compined MPG,
30 city MPG/38 highway MPG

2021 Honda Accord Sport 4dr Sedan (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 10A), 10-speed shiftable automatic, regular unleaded
26 compined MPG,
22 city MPG/32 highway MPG

2021 Honda Accord Sport Special Edition 4dr Sedan (1.5L 4cyl Turbo CVT), continuously variable-speed automatic, regular unleaded
32 compined MPG,
29 city MPG/35 highway MPG

EPA Est. MPG33
TransmissionContinuously variable-speed automatic
Drive Trainfront wheel drive
Displacement1.5 L
Passenger Volume119.4 cu.ft.
Wheelbase111.4 in.
Length192.2 in.
WidthN/A
Height57.1 in.
Curb Weight3217 lbs.

Should I lease or buy a 2021 Honda Accord?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

Check out Honda lease specials