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2013 BMW 3 Series Review

More about the 2013 BMW 3 Series
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Travel to Europe in the summer and you'll be met by an army of sport wagons heading for the Mediterranean coast. Full of children and family detritus, they are the default choice of Europe's upwardly mobile families, while sedans are reserved for the longer of tooth.

That's why, in the Old World, the 2013 BMW 3 Series Sports Wagon is as much a sure-fire hit as the next iPhone. It's everything Europeans look for in a family vehicle.

In the U.S., though, the situation remains puzzlingly different. Wagons, even the sporty kind, have taken a backseat to crossovers and SUVs. In fact, with annual sales of its wagons flatlining at around 15,000 cars per year, there were rumors that BMW wasn't going to even bother importing the new 3 Series wagon.

Thankfully the rumors weren't true, but the introduction of just a single engine variant — the 328i — smacks of a half-hearted effort. Available with either rear- or all-wheel drive, the 3 Series Sports Wagon goes on sale next spring priced from around $37,000, or $2,000-$3,000 more than the equivalent sedan. Still not a bargain, so will it sell?

The Transformation
The original E30 Touring (as it's known in Europe) began life as a skunkworks project. Frustrated by a need to carry more kit, an ingenious engineer butchered his sedan with a hatchback rear. The BMW board liked what they saw and a new model was born.

Four generations later, the premise remains largely the same. Forward of the B-pillar, the Sports Wagon is identical to the sedan. Aft of the B-pillar, life gets more interesting. The roof line extends to a modest tailgate spoiler, while the angles of the rear windows are defined by an exaggerated version of BMW's traditional "Hofmeister kink." The comparatively shallow rake of the tailgate is a non-too-subtle reminder that BMW places the emphasis on sporting versatility rather than outright practicality.

In common with its sedan brethren, the Sports Wagon has grown compared with its predecessor. Overall it's 3.8 inches longer, of which 2.0 of those inches are in the wheelbase. The rear track is 1.9 inches wider, helping balance the car's proportions. While far from radical, the latest 3 Series is a handsome evolution of traditional themes, and the days when the wagon version would pose as a stylist's afterthought are long gone. To our eyes, the Sports Wagon is as appealing as the sedan.

Can't Feel the Wagon From Behind the Wheel
We've been down this road before. Although the wagon is 175 pounds heavier than the sedan and marginally less rigid, you'd be hard-pressed to tell the difference between the two. We've criticized the latest 328i sedan before for not being quite as sharp to drive as its E90 predecessor, but this must be weighed against significant improvements in the ride quality, fuel efficiency and overall refinement.

These attributes seem especially well suited to this version of the Sports Wagon. We drove this car in tandem with the 2013 BMW X1, and while BMW has done a fine job of making its compact crossover feel like a sedan, you can't quite beat the laws of physics and the benefits of the latest-generation chassis technology. With its lower center of gravity and beautifully resolved setup, the Sports Wagon offers a level of driving pleasure that no SUV can match. The ride quality is excellent, and on the twisting back roads of our German test route, the 3 Series revealed all the poise, agility and fluency expected of a car in this price range. It was a reminder why, despite the rise of the SUV, wagons remain so popular in Europe.

Plenty of Power
Even the oft-criticized electromechanical steering system is improving with familiarity (or with BMW's subtle evolutionary tweaks). In Comfort mode it feels disappointingly lightweight and artificial, but in Sport it's nicely weighted and pleasingly linear in response. It's a shame though that, unlike Audi, BMW won't allow you to tailor the setup to your exact requirements. You can't for example, have Sport steering with Comfort chassis options.

In common with the sedan, the 328i boats BMW's 2.0-liter inline-4. Code-named N20, it benefits from a twin-scroll turbocharger and direct injection to deliver 240 horsepower at 5,000 rpm and 258 pound-feet of torque at a lowly 1,250 rpm. Mated as standard to ZF's excellent eight-speed auto (there's no manual option), BMW reckons the Sports Wagon is good for zero to 60 mph in 6.0 seconds — just 0.1 second slower than the sedan. Top speed is electronically limited to 155 mph.

EPA fuel economy figures have yet to be released, but we'd be surprised if they differ greatly from the sedan's 23 city/34 highway and 27 combined. The Sports Wagon boasts the full complement of BMW's auto stop/start and brake regeneration technology, together with an Eco Pro mode that works with the driver to minimize consumption.

BMW will be offering both rear- (sDrive) and all-wheel-drive (xDrive) models, although for now we've only been able to test the former. There will also be the option of M Sport and Adaptive M Sport suspension systems, in common with the sedan. Both options add worthwhile capability, albeit at considerable cost.

Increased Versatility
The increase in length benefits both passengers and cargo. There's a modest but useful 0.7-inch increase in rear legroom over the previous model, while the rear luggage area has grown by just over a cubic foot for a total of 17.5 cubic feet with the seats in place. Fold them down and this extends to 53.0 cubic feet.

Just as significant as the tail of the tape is this wagon's versatility. This is where the Sports Wagon scores over similarly sized SUVs. The trunk lip, for example, is just 24.4 inches above the ground, making it easier to load heavy items. The rear seats are split 40/20/40 to allow longer objects to be carried without unnecessarily penalizing passengers, and there's space under the trunk floor to hide valuables out of sight.

The cargo cover can also be stored under the trunk floor when it's not required, and BMW's engineers have conjured all manner of hooks, nets and straps to help you secure your load for some BMW-esque cornering. Pay extra for the "storage" package and you can even have a reversible trunk floor if you have a penchant for carrying dirty loads.

BMW has also engineered a couple of neat tricks into the rear hatch. A button on the rear wiper arm opens the glass area independently of the main door, which can prove handy in tight spaces if the trunk's full. The main tailgate is electrically powered, and if you opt for the Comfort Access option, you get what BMW calls a Smart Opener feature. It opens the hatch if you have the key present and extend a foot beneath the rear fenders. It's a trick found on the new Ford Escape so it's not exactly novel at this point, but once you use it, you realize it's actually quite handy.

Still a Wagon Worth Having
From the driver seat, only the scene through the rearview mirror will identify the Sports Wagon as something different from the 3 Series sedan. The multi-adjustable driving position and beautifully executed fascia are all present and correct. The view down the hood is also as common as the driving experience. The wagon, like the sedan, continues to tread an enviable line between sport sedan and business tool.

For all the thoroughness of its execution, BMW admits that it has modest aspirations for this car in the U.S. For now at least, there will be no 335i wagon and don't even ask about the brilliant diesel version that's offered in Europe. Instead, they reckon the 328i will continue to serve traditional wagon buyers without seeking out new conquests.

For us, this remains one of the great mysteries of the American automotive landscape. The Sports Wagon is a 3 Series sedan that costs only a little more, drives just as well, is arguably better-looking and comes with enough space to serve an average-size family. What's the catch?

Other than its lack of an elevated seated position, there isn't one.

Edmunds attended a manufacturer-sponsored event, to which selected members of the press were invited, to facilitate this report.

Used 2013 BMW 3 Series Overview

The Used 2013 BMW 3 Series is offered in the following submodels: 3 Series Sedan, 3 Series Coupe, 3 Series Convertible, 3 Series Hybrid. Available styles include 328i 4dr Sedan (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M), 328i xDrive 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A), 320i 4dr Sedan (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A), 328i 2dr Convertible (3.0L 6cyl 6M), 335i 4dr Sedan (3.0L 6cyl Turbo 6M), 328i 2dr Coupe (3.0L 6cyl 6M), 335i 2dr Convertible (3.0L 6cyl Turbo 6M), 335i xDrive 4dr Sedan AWD (3.0L 6cyl Turbo 6M), ActiveHybrid 3 4dr Sedan (3.0L 6cyl Turbo gas/electric hybrid 8A), 328i xDrive 2dr Coupe AWD (3.0L 6cyl 6M), 335i 2dr Coupe (3.0L 6cyl Turbo 6M), 335i xDrive 2dr Coupe AWD (3.0L 6cyl Turbo 6M), 335is 2dr Coupe (3.0L 6cyl Turbo 6M), 335is 2dr Convertible (3.0L 6cyl Turbo 6M), and 320i xDrive 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A). Pre-owned BMW 3 Series models are available with a 2.0 L-liter gas engine, with output up to 240 hp, depending on engine type. The Used 2013 BMW 3 Series comes with rear wheel drive, and all wheel drive. Available transmissions include: 6-speed manual, 8-speed shiftable automatic. The Used 2013 BMW 3 Series comes with a 4 yr./ 50000 mi. basic warranty, a 4 yr./ unlimited mi. roadside warranty, and a 4 yr./ 50000 mi. powertrain warranty.

What's a good price on a Used 2013 BMW 3 Series?

Price comparisons for Used 2013 BMW 3 Series trim styles:

  • The Used 2013 BMW 3 Series 328i is priced between $13,384 and$25,990 with odometer readings between 24566 and139550 miles.
  • The Used 2013 BMW 3 Series 328i xDrive is priced between $12,991 and$20,590 with odometer readings between 54195 and117871 miles.
  • The Used 2013 BMW 3 Series 335i is priced between $19,990 and$33,999 with odometer readings between 13637 and96133 miles.
  • The Used 2013 BMW 3 Series 320i is priced between $16,990 and$19,990 with odometer readings between 45329 and83400 miles.
  • The Used 2013 BMW 3 Series 335i xDrive is priced between $19,995 and$25,000 with odometer readings between 73449 and102816 miles.
  • The Used 2013 BMW 3 Series 320i xDrive is priced between $15,190 and$17,990 with odometer readings between 76705 and91590 miles.
  • The Used 2013 BMW 3 Series 335is is priced between $24,590 and$32,990 with odometer readings between 41232 and95156 miles.

Shop with Edmunds for perks and special offers on used cars, trucks, and SUVs near Ashburn, VA. Doing so could save you hundreds or thousands of dollars. Edmunds also provides consumer-driven dealership sales and service reviews to help you make informed decisions about what cars to buy and where to buy them.

Which used 2013 BMW 3 Serieses are available in my area?

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2013 BMW 3 Series for sale near. There are currently 66 used and CPO 2013 3 Serieses listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $12,991 and mileage as low as 13637 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a used car from our massive database to find cheap prew-owned vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the Used 2013 BMW 3 Series.

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Should I lease or buy a 2013 BMW 3 Series?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

Check out BMW lease specials
Check out BMW 3 Series lease specials