2016 Toyota Tundra Review

Pros & Cons

  • Strong V8 powertrains
  • large double cab with traditional rear doors
  • colossal CrewMax cab
  • user-friendly tech
  • unique off-road-themed TRD Pro model.
  • Below-average fuel economy
  • stiff ride
  • feels larger than rivals when driven on tight roads
  • no available V6.
List Price Range
$27,995 - $39,583

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Edmunds' Expert Review

The 2016 Toyota Tundra is a capable full-size pickup, and one of the few in this class that is very serious about off-road performance. Unfortunately, it lags behind its American rivals in many other respects.

Vehicle overview

The full-size pickup truck is an unabashedly and proudly American creation. Baseball, apple pie, pickup trucks, etc. So it is perhaps understandable, then, that the 2016 Toyota Tundra finds itself at a disadvantage compared to the full-size trucks from Ford, GM and Ram. But it's actually not because the Tundra is from a Japanese company (though it's built in Texas).

Age has a lot to do with it. The Tundra underwent a thorough update two years ago that brought revised styling, an improved cabin and updated features, but it was largely akin to a kitchen remodel as compared to breaking out the wrecking ball and fully rebuilding up from the foundation. The revisions just weren't enough to fix flaws or make notable advances. In contrast, the Ford F-150 now has a lightweight aluminum body and turbocharged engines, and the Ram 1500 has a smooth-riding coil spring suspension and efficient turbodiesel V6. The recently redesigned Chevrolet Silverado wasn't especially innovative, but its incremental improvements in just about every vehicular facet have allowed it to soundly keep up with the Joneses.

Fitted with the TRD Off-Road package, the 2016 Toyota Tundra Limited is one of the more capable light-duty trucks off road.

The Tundra does not. Its V8 engines definitely get the job done, but they trail their competitors, especially in terms of fuel economy. There also isn't a V6 option, nor a fuel-efficient alternative such as the aforementioned Ford EcoBoost V6 or Ram EcoDiesel. Then there's the driving experience. The Tundra feels more like a classic, stiff-riding truck of the past while traversing broken pavement, with bumps big and small easily being felt by all in the cabin. This is the result of a stiff rear suspension admittedly up to the task of stout hauling duties, but if it's just the family making its way across town, the jostling will get old.

In all fairness, the Tundra does indeed offer truck buyers an awful lot to value. Its double cab is one of the more spacious extended cabs on the market, while the CrewMax is legitimately sprawl-out comfortable, with not only copious legroom but also the added comfort of a reclining seatback. Those interested in venturing off road would also be wise to consider the capable TRD Pro trim level.

Yet, for the most part, the Edmunds "B"-rated 2016 Toyota Tundra quite simply falls short of the current crop of top-notch pickups: the "A"-rated Ram 1500 and Ford F-150, as well as the Chevy Silverado and GMC Sierra. The 2016 Nissan Titan XD, with its diesel-powered engine, also promises a degree of innovation the Tundra lacks and may stand a better chance of countering the argument that only American companies can build such a quintessentially American vehicle.

2016 Toyota Tundra models

The 2016 Toyota Tundra is a full-size pickup. There are three cab styles: regular cab, extended "double" cab and "CrewMax" crew cab. There are two wheelbases and three bed lengths -- 5.5-foot short bed, 6.5-foot standard bed and 8.1-foot long bed. Double Cabs and CrewMaxes seat five or six, depending on whether you opt for a front bench. The regular cab seats three.

Depending on which configuration you choose, there are six trim levels for the Tundra: SR, SR5, Limited, Platinum, 1794 Edition and TRD Pro. The availability of some options or packages can vary based on the region in which you live.

The base SR (regular and double cab only) comes standard with 18-inch steel wheels, full power accessories, keyless entry, heated mirrors, a windshield wiper de-icer, a damped tailgate, air-conditioning, cruise control, a rearview camera, 40/20/40 bench seat, cloth upholstery, a tilt-only steering wheel, Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity, and a six-speaker sound system with a 6.1-inch touchscreen interface, a CD player, an auxiliary audio jack, a USB port and a media player interface. The SR Work Truck package removes the power locks and windows, and replaces the cloth upholstery and carpet with vinyl.

Going with the SR5 (double cab and CrewMax only) gets you foglights, exterior chrome trim, variable intermittent windshield wipers and an upgraded tech interface that includes a 7-inch touchscreen, HD and satellite radios, traffic information and a navigation app. The CrewMax adds a power opening rear window and an overhead console. The SR5 Upgrade package adds front bucket seats that include a power height-adjustable driver seat and lumbar adjustment, a center console (with storage and "floor" shifter), a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, and a larger gas tank when equipped with the 5.7-liter V8. To that package, the Safety & Convenience package adds front and rear parking sensors, a blind-spot warning system and rear cross-traffic alert. Eighteen-inch alloy wheels can be added as a stand-alone option.

The TRD Pro includes the SR5 Upgrade items plus unique styling elements, black 18-inch alloy wheels, off-road tires, an off-road suspension that includes Bilstein shock absorbers, four movable bed tie-down cleats, an eight-way power driver seat, a four-way power passenger seat, leather upholstery with TRD logo and red stitching, an upgraded 7-inch touchscreen (optional on SR5), a navigation system and additional speakers (seven double cab, nine CrewMax).

The Limited (double and CrewMax only) adds to the base and Upgrade SR5 equipment automatic headlights, 20-inch alloy wheels, the tie-down cleats, automatic dual-zone climate control, an eight-way power driver seat, a four-way power passenger seat, leather upholstery, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, a power-sliding horizontal rear window (double cab), an upgraded 7-inch touchscreen, a navigation system and additional speakers (seven double cab, nine CrewMax). The Limited Premium package adds the Safety & Convenience items plus extra interior lighting and anti-theft alarm features. A sunroof is optional on the CrewMax.

At the top of the food chain, the Platinum (CrewMax only) comes standard with the Safety & Convenience items and builds on the Limited's equipment with LED running lights, power-folding and auto-dimming mirrors, a sunroof, distinctive 20-inch wheels and styling elements, heated and ventilated power front seats (10-way driver, six-way passenger), driver memory functions and a 12-speaker JBL sound system (optional on the Limited CrewMax).

The 1794 Edition really only differs from the Platinum in terms of its distinctive exterior and interior styling elements.

The TRD Off-Road package can be added to the SR5, Limited and 1794 Edition. It includes 18-inch TRD wheels, off-road tires, trail-tuned shock absorbers, skid plates and tow hooks.

Stand-alone options on most trim levels include heated tow mirrors and running boards.

The 2016 Toyota Tundra's cabin is competitive in terms of its design and quality.

2016 Highlights

For 2016, every Tundra gets an upgraded electronics interface, while the upper trim levels get a larger gas tank and a standard integrated trailer brake control. The SR5 and 1794 Edition also gets slightly revised front end styling. The 1794 can also now be equipped with the TRD Off-Road package.

Performance & mpg

The 2015 Toyota Tundra is offered with a choice of two V8 engines. Rear-wheel drive is standard and four-wheel drive with a two-speed transfer case is optional. A six-speed automatic is always standard.

For SR double cab models and all SR5 models, a 4.6-liter V8 comes standard, producing 310 horsepower and 327 pound feet of torque. EPA-estimated fuel economy is 16 mpg combined (15 city/19 highway) on 2WD models; 4WD versions also rate 16 mpg combined (14/18). Maximum towing capacity with the 4.6-liter engine is between 6,400 and 6,800 pounds depending on body style.

A 5.7-liter V8 is standard on the regular cab and all variations of the Limited, Platinum, 1794 and TRD Pro. It is optional on SR5 trims. It produces 381 hp and 401 lb-ft of torque. EPA fuel economy estimates are 15 mpg (13/18) with 2WD and 15 (13/17) with 4WD. A tow package is standard on all Tundras equipped with the 5.7-liter V8. Depending on body style, maximum towing capacity is between 9,800 and 10,500 pounds.

In Edmunds testing, a Tundra 1794 with four-wheel drive accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 6.8 seconds, while a Tundra TRD Pro did it in 6.7 seconds. These are both quick, yet average times for the segment.

Safety

Standard safety equipment on the 2016 Toyota Tundra includes antilock brakes, stability and traction control, trailer sway control, front knee airbags, front side-impact airbags and side curtain airbags that cover both rows. A rearview camera is standard across the board. A blind-spot warning system, rear cross-traffic alert and parking sensors are optional on the SR5 and Limited, and standard on the Platinum and 1794 Edition.

In government crash testing, the Tundra received four out of five stars for overall and frontal crash protection, and five stars for side protection. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave the Tundra Double Cab its top rating of "Good" in the moderate front overlap, side and roof strength tests. Its seat and head restraint design also received a "Good" rating for whiplash protection in rear impacts.

During an Edmunds braking test, a Tundra 1794 with 4WD came to a stop from 60 mph in 130 feet, which is about average for the segment. A 4WD TRD Pro took 134 feet, which isn't much farther, even considering its all-terrain tires.

Driving

We're fond of the 2016 Toyota Tundra's 5.7-liter V8. It isn't a class leader when it comes to horsepower, but it remains a champ for towing thanks to its prodigious torque and well-sorted six-speed automatic. The optional TRD exhaust paired with the 5.7-liter engine makes for a nice rumble on acceleration, too. Casual users probably will find the 4.6-liter V8's performance adequate for most driving situations short of big-time towing, and it provides better fuel economy -- although neither V8 is a class standout in this department.

The Tundra's light steering makes parking lot maneuvers easy, but it's not especially confidence-inspiring when operating at higher speeds, and contributes to the Tundra feeling bigger and more unwieldy than competing trucks (which are plenty big and unwieldy as it is). The Tundra's main demerit, however, is its ride quality. In order to haul and tow as much as possible without the need for special packages, axle ratios or separate heavy-duty models, the Tundra's suspension has been stiffened to the point that occupants feel every single bump and rut. The jostling and borderline harshness only get worse with the optional 20-inch wheels, and in general, the Tundra feels decidedly old-school at a time when its competitors (especially the Ram) have improved dramatically in this area.

Interior

The Tundra's cabin design is attractive and well built. Stepping up to one of the upper trim levels brings the sort of fancier, elevated ambience that's come to be expected from high-dollar trucks. Even the most basic Tundra, though, comes with one of Toyota's user-friendly Entune touchscreen interfaces. The SR5 trim and higher get a larger screen and increased functionality, while there are the usual array of available smartphone connectivity functions. In general, and especially compared to its Ford and GM rivals, the Tundra features user-friendly tech.

The front seats in every trim are broad and comfortable, but it's in the backseat where the Tundra enjoys advantages over most. There is a considerable amount of legroom even in the double cab, while the CrewMax boasts a vast amount of stretch-out space and the unique ability to recline the seat. The folding rear seats in double cabs and CrewMax models also provide a good amount of protected storage for valuable items you'd rather not leave in the bed.

The 2016 Toyota Tundra CrewMax's backseat flips up and even reclines.


Consumer reviews

Read what other owners think about the 2016 Toyota Tundra.

Trending topics in reviews

Most helpful consumer reviews

Vibrator to Tundra
Shakey,08/19/2016
Limited FFV 4dr CrewMax SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A)
Had a new 2015 Chevy Silverado Crew cab. I put 8,000 irritating miles on it before trading to Tundra. My Chevy had the infamous "Chevy Shake". Truck vibrated bad at speed. After several frustrating trips back to dealer to Change tires twice,multiple road force balancing and pico vibration testing. All attempts to repair failed. My dealer said "it is within GM Spec. On asphalt roads, but failed on concrete roads. So in GM's infinite visdom, they said the truck was typical of this truck? Huh? This is a well known problem and just got too fustrated with the whole GM experience. Traded the vibrator in for a 2016 Tundra Limited. I love it! As has said before, has mileage is poor. But, the motor is very smooth with tons of power. Great proven engine.
This is the best truck I have ever owned
Marty,07/17/2016
SR5 FFV 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A)
Update after 5 years, 72000 miles No issues or any problems at all. No weird noises or squeaks. Still going strong. I love this truck and would buy another Tundra as my next vehicle. But it won't be for a while. Resale value is the best among all full size V8 trucks. Update, still the best truck ever. UPDATE: Still the best truck I have ever owned. no issues, no problem, This is the best Truck I have owned. It's great in every way, the fuel economy could be better, but it's a 5.7 V8, so what do you expect. It is very comfortable and very powerful, I have seen some reviews that give it low ratings but they must be bribed by the Detroit brands or have not really tested or owned one because it does not make sense. I have owned other v8 pick ups and this is by far the best. The Titan lasted a long time, but it started falling a part after 5 years so maintenance got expensive, the Dodge Ram I have owned is by far the worst vehicle I have owned in every shape and form. And Dodge is trying to back out of all the warranties they have before Fiat took over so be ware. I have 2 kids and the Tundra CrewMax is very spacious in the back and awesome for road trips and snow trips, the 4x4 is great. do not waste your money on the others, get a tundra, and the resale value is #1 on all full size pick ups. also there are many aftermarket accessories if you are interested in the sort of thing, Texas or not this truck is great. I love driving this thing and the next truck I get if I ever get another one will also be a tundra. these trucks last forever. The ford is OK, so is the GMC, the chevy is like the dodge, cheap and unreliable. But the tundra is the best. you will not be disappointed . UPDATE: I/m at 25,000 plus miles. still the best truck I have driven. so powerful and my resale value keeps increasing with my equity in the Tundra
PLEASE Don't even consider the Big 3.
M Tron,05/27/2016
Platinum FFV 4dr CrewMax SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A)
After 18 years of driving nothing but Dodge, I finally broke ranks and bought a Platinum CrewMax. This is without a doubt the most luxurious thing I have ever owned…or been in. Seriously. This thing is on par with my wife’s Range Rover. Actually…with the air-conditioned seats (which the RR doesn’t have) it is in my opinion more luxurious. With the CM cab, it is like having a small apartment in the rear and we find ourselves opting to take the Tundra on trips rather than the RR. If you are interested in the Tundra CrewMax, I would recommend shopping the used market from 2013 and under. Don't worry about getting a used truck, these things last forever (my parents both have 200K+ on the odometer). In 2014, for some stupid reason, Toyota did away with the slide and recline rear seats in the CrewMax which negates the plethora of behind-the-seat storage in the back. From 2014 forward, all the rear seats do is fold from the floor up which is slightly less than useless. Without going into detail, this truck has every option besides remote start. The interior is amazing, quiet, comfortable, well thought out, and just plain works. The parking assist sonar and camera are awesome. The Sat Nav/infotainment is very easy to setup, pair the phone (up to 4), and other Bluetooth players (up to 2). The ventilated seats are a God send in Texas. And the power…my God you could jump start the Earth with the pulling power this thing has. And to the people moaning over mileage, you bought a 5.7 Liter V8…what were you expecting? When not towing, this package rides like a Cadillac. It is so quiet and comfortable it is almost criminal for a pickup truck. Bottom line, some magazine say other trucks have passed the Tundra, but I think they are still catching up…big time. 5 Stars. All the way.
Tundra Review
Jason,02/23/2016
Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A)
The 2016 Toyota Tundra is a great truck. I spent a LOT of timing comparing trucks before I made my purchase. I eliminated the Ram and GM products because of reliability issues I have had with both brands and reliability issues in general. My choice was down to Ford and Toyota. I liked the 2016 F150s exterior styling, but the interior seemed like it was a never ending sea of buttons and quality didn't seem to be quite as good as the Tundras. Most importantly, when comparing models with the same features, the Toyota was about $7,000 cheaper, so even with the slightly better fuel economy of the Ford, the gas savings would never make up for the premium in price (not to mention the increased insurance costs of Fords aluminum body). The Tundra rides quiet and smooth. Comfort is quite nice and I am enjoying the high quality leather seats, sound system, and overall feel of the truck. It is true the gas mileage isn't the greatest, but the engine is strong and I didn't buy the truck to get great gas mileage. The entertainment system is also very easy to use and is very responsive. If you are in the market for a truck, you should certainly take the Tundra for a test drive and see if you can justify the increased cost of the Ford or even GM and forgo the quality of Toyota. Update after two years and 25,000 miles. Still by far the best vehicle I've ever purchased. Quality is far superior to any other truck I've seen and reliability has been perfect. I still think it's super comfortable and drives very smooth. I'm REALLY happy I went with the 6.5ft bed instead of 5.5ft. If I ever get another one I will get an 8ft bed. Don't see myself ever owning another brand!

Features & Specs

See all Used 2016 Toyota Tundra features & specs

Safety

NHTSA Overall Rating

The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration offers independent analysis.
  • Frontal Barrier Crash Rating
    Overall4 / 5
    Driver4 / 5
    Passenger4 / 5
  • Side Crash Rating
    Overall5 / 5
  • Side Barrier Rating
    Overall5 / 5
    Driver5 / 5
    Passenger5 / 5
  • Combined Side Barrier & Pole Ratings
    Front Seat5 / 5
    Back Seat5 / 5
  • Rollover
    Rollover4 / 5
    Dynamic Test ResultNo Tip
    Risk Of Rollover19.8%
IIHS Rating
The Insurance Institute of Highway Safety uses extensive crash tests to determine car safety.
  • Side Impact Test
    Good
  • Roof Strength Test
    Good
  • Rear Crash Protection / Head Restraint
    Good
  • IIHS Small Overlap Front Test
    Not Tested
  • Moderate Overlap Front Test
    Good

More about the 2016 Toyota Tundra

Used 2016 Toyota Tundra Overview

The Used 2016 Toyota Tundra is offered in the following submodels: Tundra Regular Cab, Tundra CrewMax Cab, Tundra Double Cab. Available styles include SR5 FFV 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), Limited FFV 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 FFV 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 FFV 4dr CrewMax SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 FFV 4dr Double Cab SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), TRD PRO FFV 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Double Cab SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A), Limited 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR 4dr Double Cab SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A), 1794 FFV 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A), Limited FFV 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), Limited FFV 4dr CrewMax SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 4dr CrewMax SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A), Platinum FFV 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), TRD PRO FFV 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Double Cab LB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR 4dr Double Cab LB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR FFV 4dr Double Cab LB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR FFV 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A), Limited 4dr Double Cab SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR 4dr Double Cab SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), Limited 4dr CrewMax SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), Limited FFV 4dr Double Cab SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR 2dr Regular Cab LB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), 1794 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR 2dr Regular Cab 4WD LB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), Platinum FFV 4dr CrewMax SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR FFV 2dr Regular Cab 4WD LB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), 1794 FFV 4dr CrewMax SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR FFV 4dr Double Cab 4WD LB(5.7L 8cyl 6A), Platinum 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR FFV 4dr Double Cab SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (4.6L 8cyl 6A), 1794 4dr CrewMax SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR 4dr Double Cab 4WD LB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Double Cab 4WD LB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Double Cab SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR FFV 2dr Regular Cab LB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 FFV 4dr Double Cab 4WD LB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 4dr CrewMax SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), TRD PRO 4dr Double Cab 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), TRD PRO 4dr CrewMax 4WD SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), SR5 FFV 4dr Double Cab LB (5.7L 8cyl 6A), and Platinum 4dr CrewMax SB (5.7L 8cyl 6A).

What's a good price on a Used 2016 Toyota Tundra?

Price comparisons for Used 2016 Toyota Tundra trim styles:

  • The Used 2016 Toyota Tundra 1794 is priced between $36,850 and$39,495 with odometer readings between 46966 and77391 miles.
  • The Used 2016 Toyota Tundra SR5 is priced between $29,500 and$39,583 with odometer readings between 33822 and89948 miles.
  • The Used 2016 Toyota Tundra Limited is priced between $27,995 and$35,000 with odometer readings between 82386 and163221 miles.
  • The Used 2016 Toyota Tundra Limited FFV is priced between $38,368 and$38,368 with odometer readings between 49489 and49489 miles.
  • The Used 2016 Toyota Tundra SR is priced between $22,500 and$22,500 with odometer readings between 132837 and132837 miles.
  • The Used 2016 Toyota Tundra SR5 FFV is priced between $36,997 and$36,997 with odometer readings between 58051 and58051 miles.

Shop with Edmunds for perks and special offers on used cars, trucks, and SUVs near Ashburn, VA. Doing so could save you hundreds or thousands of dollars. Edmunds also provides consumer-driven dealership sales and service reviews to help you make informed decisions about what cars to buy and where to buy them.

Which used 2016 Toyota Tundras are available in my area?

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2016 Toyota Tundra for sale near. There are currently 17 used and CPO 2016 Tundras listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $22,500 and mileage as low as 33822 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a used car from our massive database to find cheap prew-owned vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the Used 2016 Toyota Tundra.

Can't find a used 2016 Toyota Tundras you want in your area? Consider a broader search.

Find a used Toyota Tundra for sale - 4 great deals out of 13 listings starting at $12,917.

Find a used Toyota for sale - 9 great deals out of 21 listings starting at $21,131.

Find a used certified pre-owned Toyota Tundra for sale - 8 great deals out of 24 listings starting at $10,205.

Find a used certified pre-owned Toyota for sale - 5 great deals out of 6 listings starting at $15,354.

Should I lease or buy a 2016 Toyota Tundra?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

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