2021 Jeep Wrangler

MSRP range: $28,475 - $53,570
(7)
MSRP$34,260
Edmunds suggests you pay$32,241

Start Price Checker
13 for sale near you

2021 Jeep Wrangler Review

  • Unrelentingly capable off-road
  • Extensive customization options
  • Available diesel engine
  • Removable top and doors
  • Steering is slow and feels loose, especially on the Rubicon trim
  • Lots of wind and tire noise at highway speeds
  • Less cargo space than some conventional SUVs
  • New Wrangler 4xe plug-in hybrid version; new Islander and 80th Anniversary special editions
  • Optional forward-facing camera for off-roading
  • Available full-time four-wheel drive for Rubicon
  • Rubicon 392 introduced with a 470-horsepower V8
  • Part of the fourth Wrangler generation introduced for 2018

The Wrangler is the original go-anywhere, do-anything vehicle that still has the spirit of the original military Jeep of World War II. In an era when SUVs have become the de facto family vehicle, the Wrangler is a throwback to rougher and more rugged off-road vehicles. It's not as comfortable as rival SUVs such as the Toyota 4Runner or Land Rover Defender, but in return it provides excellent off-road capability, two-door and four-door configurations, and a removable top.

For 2021, there's also something unexpected: a Wrangler plug-in hybrid. Called the Wrangler 4xe, it has a turbocharged four-cylinder engine plus hybrid components that provide 375 horsepower plus an estimated 25 miles of all-electric range. If that all sounds a little too much like witchcraft, don't worry. The Wrangler 4xe retains the Wrangler's eight-speed automatic transmission and is even available in the Rubicon trim. If anything, it might be even more capable off-road thanks to the instant torque of the electric motor. Jeep says the Wrangler 4xe will go on sale in early 2021.

At the opposite end of the fuel efficiency spectrum, Jeep has also introduced the Wrangler Rubicon 392. Packing a 470-hp 6.4-liter (392-cubic-inch) V8 engine, the 392 Rubicon retains all of the Rubicon's impressive low-speed off-road ability but adds a new dimension of high-speed off-road fun. The Rubicon 392 is expected to go on sale in the spring of 2021.

The Wrangler's competition is heating up. Besides its long-running rival the Toyota 4Runner, the Wrangler now has to contend with the all-new Ford Bronco, a rough-and-tumble SUV that offers similar off-road capabilities as well as a removable top and doors for those who enjoy open-air driving. There's also the Jeep Gladiator, which is basically a Wrangler with a truck bed in place of an interior cargo area.

What's it like to live with?

When the redesigned Wrangler was revealed in 2018, we knew we had to have one for our long-term test fleet. We ended up buying a top-of-the-line Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited. We tested it for two years and 50,000 miles. Check out what it's like to live with the Wrangler by reading our long-term Wrangler road test.

EdmundsEdmunds' Expert Rating
Rated for you by America’s best test team
The Wrangler oozes personality. It's fun to drive in a visceral way and is unbeatable off-road. On the downside, the steering, handling and ride quality suffer from this SUV's off-road focus. Overall, though, the Wrangler has just enough of a modern vibe to make it feel nicely up-to-date.
There's no doubt the Wrangler is a beast when it comes to off-road prowess. That's especially the case with the Rubicon trim and its 33-inch tires and lockable differentials. But everyday steering and handling suffer because of the traditional body-on-frame construction, solid-axle suspension and old-school steering. The brake pedal travel is long, which is great for modulation off-road but not ideal for everyday driving.

The 3.6-liter V6 is stout and makes plenty of power — our four-door Sahara test Wrangler scooted to 60 mph in a respectable 7.6 seconds. The eight-speed automatic transmission shifts smoothly and always seems to be in the right gear.
The Wrangler doesn't place a great importance on passenger comfort, but there are a few highlights here. The front seats are well shaped and remain livable on long trips. The rear bench is flatter and firmer, but it reclines a bit. We like the effective climate system, which also features rear air vents.

But the body-on-frame construction that gives the Wrangler its ready-for-anything personality also contributes to a brittle ride on anything but the smoothest road surfaces. The boxy design and large tires create a heap of wind and road noise, though it offers a quieter cabin than previous Wranglers. The hardtop is significantly quieter than the soft top.
Though there are many controls (especially in the Rubicon and its numerous adjustments for off-road driving), the layout is refreshingly intuitive. The slender pillars and square windows greatly reduce blind spots. The driving position is fairly upright, but there's a useful range of adjustment from the seat and steering wheel. The soft top's new design makes it easier to remove than the previous Wrangler's.

Because of the Wrangler's high stance, most people will need to use the grab handles to help get inside. We're also unimpressed by the amount of interior room — the Wrangler has less shoulder and legroom than rivals.
The Jeep Wrangler is surprisingly modern when it comes to infotainment and smartphone integration. The optional 8.4-inch Uconnect system offers sharp graphics, quick responses, and one of the best infotainment interfaces in the industry. Plenty of charging ports (USB and USB-C) are available. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto come standard with the Wrangler's 7- and 8.4-inch touchscreens.

The Wrangler falters when it comes to advanced driving systems. You can get some features, such as blind-spot monitoring, but you won't find high-tech aids such as automatic emergency braking or lane keeping assist.
The Jeep's narrow body is an off-road strength, but it does limit ultimate cargo capacity. There's a decent amount of cargo space, but competitors offer a bit more. Even so, the rear seats fold neatly into the floor if you want to carry extra stuff. And there are even six rugged tie-down points and an underfloor compartment. Up front, there aren't many places to store small items, and the door pockets are nothing more than shallow nets.

Car seats are easy to fit in the Unlimited so long as they're not too bulky — you might have to move the front seat forward to fit a rear-facing seat. The Wrangler can tow up to 3,500 pounds and can be flat-towed behind a motorhome.
At 20 mpg combined, the Wrangler Unlimited with 4WD and the V6 is 2 mpg better than the Toyota 4Runner, its closest SUV competitor. However, we've struggled to meet these estimates in traffic-clogged Los Angeles; our average fuel economy over 30,000 miles in a long-term Rubicon was 17.6 mpg. The optional 2.0-liter turbo is rated at 22 combined (22 city/24 highway), which nearly matches mainstream crossovers such as the Ford Edge and Toyota Highlander.
The Wrangler looks like Jeep put real effort into the interior. Much of the switchgear looks distinct and is satisfying to use. The dash and seat materials are attractive and have a good tactile feel. The Wrangler's price tag is a little high, but the improved materials and design feel worth the cost. Jeep's warranty coverage is average.
Few vehicles are as distinctive as the Jeep Wrangler. This is one of the few no-compromise off-road vehicles left. And it happens to be an iconic convertible! Forget about steering and handling because, after all, these things are forgettable. You can go anywhere with one of these.

Which Wrangler does Edmunds recommend?

While the base Wrangler Sport is plenty capable, it feels absolutely spartan compared to just about every other new vehicle on sale today. We suggest stepping up to the Sport S trim, which adds features including air conditioning, power windows and power door locks.

Jeep Wrangler models

The 2021 Jeep Wrangler SUV is available as a two-door or four-door (Unlimited). Both have a removable roof (either a soft top or hardtop) and doors as well as a folding windshield. The two-door is available in three trim levels — Sport, Sport S and Rubicon — while the four-door Wrangler is also available in the more street-tuned Sahara trim. Building off that, there are subtrims such as Willys and Altitude.

All Wranglers come standard with four-wheel drive and a 3.6-liter V6 (285 hp, 260 lb-ft). That engine is also available with Jeep's eTorque mild hybrid system for improved fuel economy. You can get the V6 with either a six-speed manual or an eight-speed automatic transmission. 

A turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder (270 hp, 295 lb-ft) is optional on both body styles. The four-door Wrangler is also available with a turbocharged 3.0-liter diesel V6 (260 hp, 442 lb-ft). Those two engines are only available with the eight-speed automatic. And new to the Wrangler, a 6.4-liter V8 (470 hp, 470 lb-ft) is only available on the Rubicon trim level and also comes mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission.

The Wrangler 4xe plug-in hybrid powertrain arrives midway through the model year. It combines the four-cylinder engine and eight-speed automatic with two integrated electric motor-generators. A 27-kWh hybrid battery pack is mounted underneath the rear seats. Jeep says the 4xe produces 375 hp and 470 lb-ft of torque and should be capable of 25 miles of all-electric range. The 4xe powertrain is available for the four-door Wrangler only.

Sport
The base Sport trim is relatively bare bones, though it does include a number of standard features such as:

  • 17-inch steel wheels
  • Skid plates
  • Tow hooks
  • Foglights
  • Crank windows
  • Manual door locks
  • 5-inch touchscreen display

Willys Sport
This is an optional package on the Wrangler Sport that adds more off-road capability and some minor styling tweaks.

  • Black-painted wheels, badges and grille
  • Willys decals on the hood and tailgate
  • Four-wheel disc brakes
  • Limited-slip rear differential
  • All-weather floor mats

Sport S
Think of this as the base Sport model with a few extra creature comforts, including:

  • Alloy wheels
  • Air conditioning
  • Leather-wrapped steering wheel
  • Power windows and door locks
  • Tinted windows

Willys Sport S
This package combines the Willys Sport with Sport S features.

Altitude
Based on the Sport S and only available on the four-door Wrangler. It adds:

  • Black 18-inch wheels with all-terrain tires
  • Standard three-piece black hardtop roof
  • Black interior and exterior trim accents
  • Upgraded off-road suspension

Sahara
This midtier trim is only available on the four-door model. Features include:

  • 18-inch wheels
  • Full-time four-wheel drive (automatically engages but no selectable low-range gearing)
  • Body-colored grille with chrome inserts
  • Body-colored fender flares
  • Automatic climate control
  • 7-inch touchscreen
  • Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration

Altitude
Similar to the Sport S Altitude, the Sahara Altitude comes equipped with:

  • Sport S Altitude features
  • Body-colored three-piece hardtop with headliner
  • Leather seats, parking brake handle and shift knob

High Altitude
Includes or replaces Altitude features, adding:

  • 20-inch wheels with all-season tires
  • Sport-tuned suspension
  • Body-colored mirrors, door handles, bumpers and fuel door
  • Upgraded infotainment system with 8.4-inch touchscreen display
  • 4G LTE Wi-Fi hotspot
  • Alpine audio system
  • Blind-spot monitoring with cross-traffic alert
  • Parking sensors
  • LED headlights, taillights and daytime running lights
  • Keyless entry

Rubicon
Named for the 22-mile off-road trail in Northern California, the Rubicon is focused on being the most capable production off-roader available from Jeep. Features include:

  • 17-inch wheels with 33-inch off-road tires and larger fender flares
  • Heavy-duty Dana 44 front and rear axles with shorter 4.10 gear ratio
  • 4:1 low-range gearing (provides extra traction when off-roading)
  • Electronic locking front and rear differentials (provides extra traction when off-roading)
  • Electronic disconnecting front stabilizer bar (enhances wheel articulation when off-roading)
  • Rock rails (protects underbody when off-roading)
  • Cloth interior
  • Soft-top roof
  • Automatic climate control
  • Power windows
  • Keyless entry with push-button start

Rubicon 392
Takes all the capability of the standard Rubicon and speeds it up with a 470 hp 6.4-liter V8 engine. Additional features include:

  • Uprated suspension with unique Fox shock absorbers and a 2-inch lift
  • Special exterior styling, including bronze exterior accents and a restyled hood
  • Active exhaust with four tailpipes
  • Leather-wrapped sport steering wheel with paddle shifters
  • Leather sport seats with extra bolstering

Many of the features included with the subtrims are available via optional packages on the main trims. Other major options include:

  • LED Lighting Group
    • LED foglights, headlights and taillights
  • Trailer Tow and HD Electrical Group
    • Upgraded electrical components
    • Class II receiver tow hitch
  • Cold Weather Group
    • Heated seats and steering wheel
    • Remote engine start
  • Advanced Safety Group
    • Adaptive cruise control (adjusts speed to maintain a constant distance between the vehicle and the car in front)
    • Forward collision mitigation (warns you of an impending collision and applies the brakes in certain scenarios)
  • Sky One-Touch Power Top (combines hardtop sides with a retractable fabric roof-length cover)
People Also Viewed
2018 Jeep Wrangler JKLearn more
2018 Jeep Wrangler JK
2021 Toyota TacomaLearn more
2021 Toyota Tacoma
2021 Jeep Grand CherokeeLearn more
2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Consumer reviews

Read what other owners think about the 2021 Jeep Wrangler.

5 star reviews: 100%
4 star reviews: 0%
3 star reviews: 0%
2 star reviews: 0%
1 star reviews: 0%
Average user rating: 5.0 stars based on 7 total reviews

Trending topics in reviews

  • engine
  • ride quality
  • towing
  • off-roading
  • wheels & tires
  • appearance
  • value
  • driving experience
  • maintenance & parts
  • reliability & manufacturing quality
  • brakes
  • spaciousness
  • interior
  • technology

Most helpful consumer reviews

5 out of 5 stars, Most Fun I've Ever Had in a Car!
Lisa P.,
Unlimited High Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A)

This is not the Wrangler I had 20 years ago that's for sure! Jeep has re-imagined the ride making it a lot smoother and much more efficient while keeping the same Jeep Wrangler design, style, and make that I loved so much then and even more now!

5 out of 5 stars, 2021 Jeep Wrangler Sport 4X4
Michael T,
Unlimited High Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A)

This is my dream vehicle and a retirement gift to myself. I'm 6'02" and I have plenty of room for my legs and knees. It has plenty of options to upgrade and the best part of this vehicle is the engine; 2.0L I4 DOHC Turbo Engine with Start Stop - this feature can be manually shut off if you don't care for it. Unless you're going to be hauling a very heavy load or doing serious off-roading, you should buy the 6 cylinder engine. The engine's HP/Torque ratio compared to the 6 cylinders are very close. I purchased this Jeep without any running boards b/c I can save a few bucks by purchasing an after-market kit. It comes with a Jeep toolkit, extra wheel locks, and a rear backup camera cover in order to protect it while you're driving off-road in gravel from any debris that may damage the lens. It has plenty of power and the all-wheel disc brakes work fantastic. I will have this vehicle for the rest of my life...

5 out of 5 stars, Jeep Wrangler Lease Experience
Raquel ,
Unlimited Sport S 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M)

The car is a little jerky when you first drive it, but you get used to it the more you drive. I would recommend getting windshield insurance/coverage.

5 out of 5 stars, Beautiful Beast
Selina,
Unlimited Rubicon 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M)

A beautiful Rubicon packaged to perfection - like it was made just for me!

Write a review

See all 7 reviews


2021 Jeep Wrangler videos

Read Description

In this video, see how the new Defender stacks up against the best off-roaders on the market. Our experts evaluate the new 2020 Land Rover Defender on the road and off-road with two of the best and most popular off-road vehicles, the Toyota 4Runner and the Jeep Wrangler. How does the new Defender stack up? Find out in a good old-fashioned off-road comparison test.

SPEAKER 1: If you've wanted an off-road SUV in America your options have been between a Toyota and a Jeep for, let's say, all of recent history. Take these two for example, the Jeep Wrangler and the Toyota 4Runner, arguably the two most capable offered SUVs you can get for your money. SPEAKER 2: But wait, there's more. And it's this, the all new Land Rover Defender. SPEAKER 1: And in 30 seconds our esteemed British cultural expert, Alistair Weaver, will give us the history of the Land Rover Defender. 30 seconds SPEAKER 3: 30 seconds. SPEAKER 1: Go. SPEAKER 3: Originally sketched on a Welsh beach back in 1947, is Britain's answer to the Jeep. The Defender was the original Land Rover, even if, technically, the Defender name didn't appear until 1983. By the time production ceased in 2016, over two million had been built. Like the original Mini, it is a British icon. The British army goes to war in them. My dad had one. I had one. Her Majesty, the queen-- God bless-- still has one. It is fish and chips in automotive form. SPEAKER 1: Little over 30 seconds, but we'll let it slide. SPEAKER 3: The eloquence is worth it. SPEAKER 2: Well, Thanks for that history lesson. This has some history too, it won World War II. SPEAKER 3: Even if it turned up late. SPEAKER 2: We're going to evaluate the Land Rover Defender to see how it stacks up against these off-road specific SUVs. And, in the end, we should be able to tell you which one is the right fit for you. SPEAKER 1: We'll evaluate the new Defender by comparing it on and off road with these well-established peers. On the freeway we'll consider driveability and comfort. Off the freeway we have a few tests plan to explore the Defender's capabilities and place them in context with the Wrangler and 4Runner. Buckle up, it's going to be a long one. Before we get these cars too dirty, make sure to like, comment, and subscribe, and check the links below. And also visit Edmunds.com/sellmycar to get a cash offer on your-- Is that the elephant in the room? SPEAKER 3: No Carlos, it's a Bronco. The new Defender's priced around $50,000 and, like the Wrangler, is available as either a two or a four-door, called the 90 and 110 respectively. This is, obviously, the four-door, and it's one of the first cars off the boat. It's heavily specified topping out at over $72,000. Now that's a lot of money, but we played around with the online configurator, and we reckon a two-door with all the off-road kit costs around $53,000 in the spec that you'd want. That's about 15% more than the equivalent Wrangler. To be honest, when I first saw it in pictures I thought it looked a bit soft and even cartoonish. Certainly when compared to the very alpha original, but in real life, I think it works a lot better. And some of that's to do with the proportions. It's about the same length as a Wrangler and the 4Runner, but it's wider and taller, and that gives it a real presence. The Defender is deliberately not a retro pastiche of the original, but some of the detailing did make the cut. I love these Safari rear windows, for example. And I think what they've done with the light treatment here at the rear is just terrific. But the most controversial feature of the new Defender is this square. Mark Takahashi actually studied design and worked in design before he does whatever he does now. Mark, What do you think of the square? SPEAKER 2: It's triggering that record scratch in my brain right now. It could have extended top and bottom, been a little thinner, otherwise it's making a strong case for piano black, [? which is ?] something I really hate. SPEAKER 3: I kind of like it. Do you know what's really irritating me? On this side of the car it kind of lines up. On the other side it sort of doesn't, and it's really playing with my OCD. One feature this car does have which I wish it didn't was these rims, these alloys. You can get the Defender with 18 inch steelies, which just look awesome. Overall I do like the look of the new Defender. As I said, he's it's real presence about it. But can you imagine Jeep reinventing the Wrangler to this extent? Honestly, there'd be a march on Detroit. SPEAKER 2: The Jeep Wrangler is known as an off-road weapon, especially in this Rubicon trim which starts around $44,000. We've covered it a ton. We've had one in our long-term fleet, and you can read all about it in the links below. In addition to the tough-looking exterior, this Jeep actually has a lot underneath too. It has a solid front axle and a sway bar that can be disconnected with the touch of a button. You can get it with a V6, a Mild Hybrid V6, a turbo diesel V6, but this one has the turbo four cylinder that's good for 270 horsepower and 295 pound feet of torque. It's all run through an eight speed automatic transmission. On top of that, it has the 33 inch BFGoodrich K02 all-terrain tires that are bigger than the other two. The question is, how does all this off-road hardware affect on-road behavior and comfort? SPEAKER 1: Though capable, the 4Runner has been on sale for a long time. It's old. This generation has been out for, it feels like, over a decade now, but people seem to really like it still. Why? Well, Toyota keeps improving and updating it. The current 4Runner is available in a wide range of options and configurations, from the base level all the way up to the luxury, limited model. You can get it with all wheel drive. You can get it with four-wheel drive. You can get it with a trick system that automatically disconnects the sway bars when you start driving it off-road. This is the 4Runner TRD Pro. If you want to know more about this particular Model you can see my other video on it that we made previously. But, in brief, it's the most expensive and most serious off-road 4Runner you can buy new. And it also kind of serves as an example to 4Runner owners what they can do with their 4Runner in the aftermarket. I like it because it's simple. It's four-wheel drive. It's got upgraded springs and shocks and a little lift kit that's going to give it more wheel travel, more control, and more durability when you're going off-road too. Now, the downside is, again, the age, and that really shows up underneath the hood. You have a four liter V6 that not only has the least amount of power here, but also the worst fuel economy. And you can attribute that to the five speed automatic transmission, which is about as relevant in 2020 as a fax machine, or the periscope app, or the concept of bipartisanship, or your right to personal privacy, or social gathering, or a trebuchet. SPEAKER 2: Carlos! SPEAKER 1: It's old. But it's still sturdy and dependable and trustworthy, and, hey, I kind of like it too. You have to drive to a trail in order to drive on a trail, so let's first cover with each of these do well and not so well on the road while you're commuting. The 4Runner, being an ancient car relative to the other vehicles in this comparison, you would expect it to seem and appear a lot worse on the road than it actually is. Let's start with the highlights, and the first is interior space and cargo space specifically. On paper, interior space actually isn't that great relative to the Jeep and the Defender, but in practice, it doesn't feel cramped at all. I've got plenty leg, head, shoulder room around me. The 4Runner's biggest strength though is the cargo volume, which is the biggest of this comparison. That makes it more of a usable vehicle in terms of daily driving. Yes it's dated, but beyond that, though, the interior remains surprisingly functional. Now even the steering works for what this vehicle is. It still rides on a truck-based construction, and it does steer better than the Wrangler. Now the downsides. First off, I'll say the TRD Sport exhaust that comes on this TRD Pro, I would get rid of that the first thing. It emphasizes probably the worst elements of the V6 noise at normal cruising speed. It sounds great when you're at wide open throttle, but at normal cruising speed it does not sound good. The worst bit though is definitely the 5-speed automatic transmission. The 5-speed automatic really makes itself noticeable when you're accelerating up an on ramp, when you're trying to maintain freeway speeds, even in moderate wind. This transmission really has a tough time maintaining speeds, freeway speeds especially. It is the thing that would hold me back from recommending the 4Runner to somebody, is that transmission. If this had the powertrain from even the Jeep, this would be a much nicer vehicle to drive. And I really think it's just a transmission away from being a tremendous success. In spite of the 4Runner's age and some of the flaws that come with that age, this thing still has a ton of charm that I find it really appealing for reasons that I can't quite explain. There is just a certain charm to the way this drives. It might have to do with the way it looks-- it looks fantastic in this army green and black motif-- but pretty much everybody in our group has found that the 4Runner has a charm in the driving experience that the others lack. I'd go on record and say I'd probably have one if it weren't for that transmission. SPEAKER 2: When it comes to purpose built vehicles, for me, when I'm evaluating them, it's a sliding scale. Like a sports car, on one end you have all out performance, and on the other end you have comfort. The same goes for off-road vehicles. On the spectrum for off-road vehicles, the Wrangler is definitely more hardcore and more focused on off-road performance, where comfort, It's not secondary, but it certainly isn't the priority. A lot of the things that make the Wrangler a great off-roader-- the solid front axle and the recirculating ball steering-- well, that doesn't play so well on the road. Right now we're on a highway and it takes a lot more tending to to keep it within its lane. It's a little lazy. It's kind of got a big dead spot in the middle. But, that's kind of exactly what you want when you're doing some serious off-roading. And there's also the noise. We have this kind of hybrid top with a fabric center, and it's doing a decent job of cutting out a lot of the wind noise. But with these off-road tires, you're hearing a lot of tire howl, but not nearly as much as if you went with some really serious mudder tires. Now, you'd think, right off the bat when you look at the specs for this car, that the four cylinder engine would be kind of a pig, but it's not. And the thing about serious off-roading is it's not so much how much power you have, it's the gearing that you have. This has the goods right off the bat. SPEAKER 3: So let's cut to the chase, comparing how this car drives on road versus the old Defender is a bit like comparing a full burger with the finest Waygu beef. Is not just better than the old Defender, it's also miles better than the Wrangler and the 4Runner. Land Rover has done a great job of creating a vehicle that feels more like a sophisticated SUV than a traditional off-roader. The ride quality is comfortable even on these all-terrain tires. The steering has a wonderful kind of positivity about it. It's easy to place on the road. You don't not get that kind of wandering that you do in the Wrangler. What I would say though, is that it's exceptionally heavy. We take every test vehicle down to our private test track, and we spend a fortune on this every year. We're one of the few publications left in the world that actually bothers to do this. But here's why, Land Rover claims that this vehicle should be around 5,000 pounds. It's actually 5,600 in this specification. Now, that's more than the current Range Rover and more than our heavily specified Ram 1,500 truck. That's insane for a car on a new platform. It's also reflected in the 0 to 60 time. Land Rover claims 5.8 seconds. We did 6.7 seconds, which is still the fastest vehicle here, but even so, it's almost a second slower than the manufacturer claims which has definitely a mark against it. Having said that, it is super refined in here. Land Rover has done a great job with this interior, mixing a sort of utilitarian sheet with some interesting material choices. I particularly like this magnesium bar that runs the length of the fascia and is actually structural. It's a trick that Ford's trying with the new Bronco, too. Did I mentioned Bronco, by the way? It also really works from a practical perspective. There's oodles of storage space in here. And you can also replace this center console bin here with a little jump seat so you can sit three and three in both the 110 and the 90. I think that's really cool. There's also a lot more space overall. It's weird that the wheelbase on this car is pretty much identical to the Wrangler, but there is a lot more room inside. The driver's seat has a lot more rearward travel-- which is great if you're tall like me-- and rear seat occupants just have a lot more head, shoulder, and knee room. If you're going to buy this car as a family vehicle, then that's a huge bonus. There's also some pretty imaginative material choice in here, though we did have some reservations about its durability. This cup holder, for example, is marked up pretty badly already. Interestingly, the Defender also has a longer wheelbase than the Discovery, and I think it's much more roomy inside, and this is going to be a problem for Land Rover. The idea is that the big daddy Range Rover is the luxurious choice. The Discovery is the family versatile alternative. And then Defender is the beat it up, go off-road, alpha male. Except that, in many ways, I think this is much cooler than the Discovery. I think it looks a lot better, and it's got more interior space. Land Rover have got to be really careful they don't just end up stealing sales from themselves. SPEAKER 1: Now that we're done whining about on-road refinement, let's start our off-road evaluation. We have two deceivingly simple tests that are designed to bring out the strengths and weaknesses of each of the SUVs here. To start our off-road analysis we're going to start with a hill climb. Now this hill may not look like much, but the surface is actually really slippery-- it's mostly sand-- and so each one of us are going to try to climb this hill using the fewest amount of electronic controls and advancement and tools that we have available. Now the 4Runner doesn't have much, but I'm going to see what I can do. I'm going to start out by shifting to low gear. I'm in neutral, shift to 4 Low. I'm in 4 Low. Put it in first gear-- I do like the fact that it's just a lever and you move over-- and I'm going to crawl my way up and see what can happen, see how far I can get before I need to start leaning on some of the controls this 4Runner has. We're just beginning to start the climb. All good so far. And I've stopped making progress. All right. So let's try locking the rear diff. A little bit more. Hey, locking the rear diff helped. And, next step. So I'm going to turn on the crawl control. That's only available in 4 Low, but that's basically an off-road cruise control with five different speed settings. Once I turn that on-- I've got it set at the lowest possible speed-- it's kind of like off-road cruise control. My foot is off the gas pedal, it's hovering the brake, and the crawl control is managing the traction of the front tires by selectively applying the brakes, basically doing the job of a front differential-- a locking front differential-- if this had one. And it's actually doing a really good job, even though it doesn't sound that great. Although at this point, with this kind of incline, I would love to have a forward facing camera to see where I'm going once I crest this hill, but I don't, so I just have to, you know, let Jesus take the wheel. And that did it. In order to climb that hill, though , once I crest the top, I'm going to dial up speed a little bit. So that made it, but I had to use every single electronic control the 4Runner has available. So it's nice that you have those tools, but you do have to lean on them. I started out in 4 High-- I started out in 4 Low, I had to lock the rear diff, and then I had to engage the crawl control. It's nice that you have those, and it's nice that it works, I guess is the big takeaway. SPEAKER 2: Carlos made it up the hill but he needed all the bells and whistles to get there. I'm going to try and go as minimal as possible. So I'm going in 4 High. Throw it into manual. So I'm keeping the sway bar connected, I'm not locking anything, and I'm confident I'm going to make it up. It might take a little effort but, I don't think I'm going to have to engage anything else. Well, we'll see. Slow and steady, slow and steady. Baby, Baby hold together. Aw! Nyet! Going 4 Low. That's going to give me all the warnings, that auto park, forward collision, and all that other good stuff is off. Sway bar is still connected. Let's try 4 Low. Come on baby, you can do it. Yeah, Yeah. And I'm just barely breathing into the throttle. Yeah, this is easy-peasy. Tried to crab a little bit but-- Yeah. 4 Low, that's all she wrote, easy-peasy, big blue Jeep-y. Here we go. Ain't no thing. So, not surprising at all, that the Wrangler made it up with only going into 4 Low as opposed to Carlos, which had to use all of his bells and whistles, and crawl control, and everything else. And I had a ton of other tools in my toolbox and I didn't even get to. I didn't have to lock any diffs, I didn't have to disconnect the sway bar. So I had several more levels to go. SPEAKER 3: The key big difference in this car is so much is actually controlled through the electronics and through the screen. So, if we go into 4x4 information here, we've got various different setups. And you've even got a mode here for wade sensing to tell you how much water's underneath-- we'll worry about that later. You've also then got these configurable setups, auto terrain response. So you can actually toggle through mud and ruts, grass, gravel, snow, sand, rock crawl, wade. And then it's actually configurable within the system to allow you to choose things like how you want the differentials to work, how you want the powertrain, steering, traction control. It's pretty clever stuff. I'm just going to leave it in Auto. So, in theory, now the car should do everything for me, but I am going to go back into four-wheel drive. I'm just going to now raise the suspension to give us some ground clearance. So it should give you a notification here that I'm going to off-road height, which it's done. I've got additional information sitting here on my dashboard. We're going to follow what the Wrangler did, which is start off in High and away we go. For Queen and Country. Here we go. Now this weighs a lot more, now that could be a double-edged sword in that it might help me with traction but it also might help me get bogged down. I'll try and keep it rolling, here we go. Here you go. Come on, baby. Come on, baby. Come on. This is still in 4 High this, is pretty impressive. Blimey. We're also on less aggressive tires than either the Wrangler or the 4Runner, and it's just monstering its way to the top. [CHUCKLES] Ding-dong. Hello. The other thing that it's got, when I get to the top here, we've got a little camera that can show me the terrain over the top. So if I get to a top like this, and it looks a little bit dicey, the reality is I can just roll down the other side and I can actually see what I'm doing. Again, really clever stuff. Well that was easy. I think I won that one. Oh, yes. Rule Britannia. Rule Britannia. SPEAKER 1: That should feel pretty good, Yes? SPEAKER 3: We had a little chat before we set off and I explained that this was for Queen and Country, and it just kind of lifted up its skirt and up it went, 4 High. Didn't even have to engage low ratio. SPEAKER 1: What's the saying, keep calm and carry on? SPEAKER 3: Stiff upper lip, dear chap. SPEAKER 1: It looks more curved from here. SPEAKER 3: Seriously though, that was really impressive. I didn't have to do-- I just kept a sensible space, I didn't really modulate the throttle. I just kind of let the car do the work. It was really good. SPEAKER 1: Yeah I'm kind of ashamed of our performances . Here I think we need to find a more challenging test. SPEAKER 2: Sway bars may be great for on-road use, but when you're off-roading you want a little more articulation. So we're going to demonstrate climbing the ziggurat of integrity with the sway bar connected and then later with it disconnected. Easy, easy. Look at that. We're already off. All right, backing up. The best part with the Jeep is, it's just a button push, a couple seconds, SPEAKER 1: OK, now straight. There you go. You're doing great. SPEAKER 2: Oh, God. Here we go. Automatic door closer, it's an option. The one area where the Wrangler is unassailed is approach angle, but the other two measurements it loses to the Defender. But when it comes to real hardcore use, well we've got some cool stuff like, first of all, this cool red tow hook here. It's beefy, but it's open. But of course, part of the approach angle is because it has this cool, optional $1,500 steel bumper that's really beefy with some red hooks popping out the top, and it is really strong. It will take my COVID weight just fine. Yeah. I think I want one now. SPEAKER 1: The 4Runner may not have fancy disconnecting sway bars-- at least this TRD Pro doesn't-- but crawl control has not let me down yet. Don't fail me now. That feels kind of precarious. Did I get to the same step as the Jeep? Can I actually get out? Don't do this at home kids. That's fairly impressive considering no disconnecting sway bars, and the lack of clearances the 4Runner actually has on paper, in terms of specs, this has the lowest approach and departure angles of the Wrangler and the Defender. Also it has these massive sidesteps which really limit breakover clearance. We've scraped these a number of times already. Also, if you notice, there's about three or four inches of nothing between my rear tire and the ground. If you remember from the Wrangler, that rear tire was still in the ground, so this has less articulation even though it was able to get to the same step. SPEAKER 3: So now it's the Defender's turn for the-- what are you calling it again? SPEAKER 1 AND SPEAKER 2: The ziggurat of integrity! SPEAKER 1: The Ziggurat of integrity. I've put it into rock crawl mode because we're crawling rocks. And now my little party piece-- wait for this-- here we go. Up we come, sonny. Off-road height selected. Look at that. Now, in theory at least, they should be a tough test for the Defender because, with its independent suspension, it may not have the articulation of the Wrangler, but let's find out. So here we go. Gently does it. SPEAKER 1 AND SPEAKER 2: [LAUGHTER] SPEAKER 3: How are we looking, gentlemen? I can see from my little gadget inside I'm currently at 18 degrees. I believe this will go to 45, so we're well within the vehicle's capability. I think we can go a bit higher. My, God, this is when you feel the weight of the doors. Excuse me, I don't want to destroy the microphone. I just don't want to drop this on my leg. SPEAKER 1: If only you had a sidestep. SPEAKER 3: Carlos, I'm six foot four, I don't need a sidestep. SPEAKER 1: No. No. SPEAKER 3: So, despite the absence of trick anti-sway bar switch off gadgets, you can still see it's pretty impressive. We've reached the same step as both a Wrangler and the 4Runner. Interesting in the back, it has picked up a left wheel-- which the Wrangler didn't-- so maybe the articulation isn't quite as good. But if you journey around the other side, let's play the cutaway you can actually see there's less compression there than there was in the other vehicles. It's really just operating a different kind of suspension system. One other thing that's really impressed me, Land Rover says that this is structurally the most rigid vehicle they've ever produced. And look, [CHUCKLE] even at this angle, you can still open the rear door. I can just about shut it again as well. What is much less impressive though, is the fact that you haven't got readily accessible recovery hoops as you have on the other two vehicles. So then you're going to have to improvise with towing hooks or suspension parts, which really isn't cool. Maybe it doesn't think its customers will push it that hard. Either way, be a nice to have. Come on Baron, Baron VonBronco. SPEAKER 1: After performing our tests we then just played around a bit. Let's give an overall opinion of each of these SUVs. Let's talk about the 4Runner's overall off-road performance as I travel through this frame twister course. Ultimately this thing was able to do everything we subjected to all three vehicles. It was able to do all the tasks. Now, you could argue that we didn't do the most extreme off-road testing in the world. Unfortunately, there is an infinite number of ways we could have made this more challenging, but for the off-road tasks that we did find, the obstacles that we did find, this performed pretty admirably considering the deficits it has. This doesn't have the most clearance of the group. It doesn't have the most power. It's got the most archaic transmission, and yet it could do everything we basically asked from it. I had to lean on all the electronic controls to get there, but fortunately those controls are available. And if you want to do more with your 4Runner, well, hey, guess what? There's the aftermarket. You can put on bigger wheels and tires, and beefier shocks, and all that stuff is possible. That's frankly the way you should go. Overall the 4Runner shows its age off-road, but is still able to do all the stuff we would hope it could. SPEAKER 2: As a surprise to no one, the Wrangler does exceptionally well off-road, duh. What was the surprise, though, was how well the Defender did. But there's something about this Wrangler that really kind of got a hold of me, and that's this analog version of the other two. I have these big chunky levers and buttons and stuff to mess with that is all manual. You don't really rely on any computers to help you out versus the others which feel almost like a video game. A lot of it's done for you especially with the crawl mode on the 4Runner that Carlos is relying on so much. With this I really barely just got into its potential. SPEAKER 3: I think it's obvious by now that we are hugely impressed by the Defender's off-road ability. There was always going to this question of this car, is it a real Defender? And what people mean by that is, does it have the off-road chops? And I think the answer is a resounding yes. And it also makes everything very easy. Even if you're a novice, it's very smooth. All the electronics and sophistication mean you can tackle huge obstacles even if you're not massively experienced off-road. What counts against it? Well, all those electronics, all that technology. If this does break down in the boonies then you're not going to fix it with a spanner and a belt strap like you might have done the original. The other thing is you're not going to have the big aftermarket support that you have with a Wrangler and the 4Runner. So if you are a hobbyist who likes to modify your vehicle, then it's not so easy. I really hope that market develops because this vehicle deserves it. Believe me, this is a proper off-roader. It's really good. SPEAKER 1: This comparison has come to an end which is unfortunate because we've had a lot of fun with these three cars. What have we learned? Well, let's start with the 4Runner. This is a trusty, dependable rig that you really don't have to think about too much when you're driving it, which is nice. It may not be able to reach the same off-road extremes as these other two, but it can get most of the way there. Plus, it's pretty nice to drive on the road, especially thanks to the additional cargo space it has that helps with the day to day SUV stuff, just never mind that five speed automatic transmission. Overall, this is a much more palatable vehicle as the $40,000 TRD off-road instead of this $52,000 TRD Pro. SPEAKER 3: There's no question that has like an old school charm about it. For me it just feels like it's a gearbox and an engine short of actually still being really desirable despite being 10 years old. SPEAKER 1: And also cool looking car here. My vote. SPEAKER 3: Especially in the green. SPEAKER 2: Meanwhile, we have the seasoned veteran here that can go anywhere, do anything, and Yeah, there's some payback for that. It's-- SPEAKER 3: Ride quality. SPEAKER 1: Steering. Noise in the cabin, cabin space-- SPEAKER 3: Especially in the rear and the front SPEAKER 1: Yes. SPEAKER 2: But if you're not fragile, it's a really good choice. I mean it starting to sway me over. I might actually start thinking about one of these. SPEAKER 3: Great for the hobbyist. SPEAKER 2: Unlimited choices for aftermarket customization, whatever you want. SPEAKER 3: That's true, but I think we've all been genuinely surprised-- I think that's fair-- by just how good the new Defender is. SPEAKER 1: Shocked. SPEAKER 3: On-road, by far and away the best car here. Off-Road, super smooth, super capable, made everything feel really easy. It just took it in stride everything that we threw at it. SPEAKER 2: Went anywhere the Jeep did. SPEAKER 3: And it has a bigger interior space as well than the Jeep. It's a better family-- in fact it crosses that bridge between 4x4 and SUV really well. On the downside, it is heavily reliant on electronics if you're heading off into the wilderness. And, of course, it is more expensive. If you want one with all the off-road hardware you're going to be paying around $55,000 at least. It's about 15% more than the equivalent Wrangler. But we think, even that price, it's still pretty good value for what it does. But, of course, this is the eliminator for the main event. This whole 4x4 thing is not a three horse race. SPEAKER 1: Poor Bronco. SPEAKER 3: Poor Bronco. SPEAKER 1: And on that bombshell we'll stop ripping off Top Gear. SPEAKER 3: Think it's worth one more go? SPEAKER 1: OK. He's not going to land on his toes. SPEAKER 3: Maybe it's like a knife, where you can throw it straight from its nose. Shall we say one horse in the room? SPEAKER 1: This is not a three horse race. SPEAKER 3: No, that's good. I like that.

Features & Specs

Unlimited Rubicon 4dr SUV 4WD features & specs
Unlimited Rubicon 4dr SUV 4WD
3.6L 6cyl 6M
MSRP$42,195
MPG 17 city / 23 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission6-speed manual
Horsepower285 hp @ 6400 rpm
See all for sale
Unlimited Sport S 4dr SUV 4WD features & specs
Unlimited Sport S 4dr SUV 4WD
3.6L 6cyl 6M
MSRP$35,175
MPG 17 city / 23 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission6-speed manual
Horsepower285 hp @ 6400 rpm
See all for sale
Unlimited Sahara 4dr SUV 4WD features & specs
Unlimited Sahara 4dr SUV 4WD
3.6L 6cyl 6M
MSRP$38,645
MPG 17 city / 23 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission6-speed manual
Horsepower285 hp @ 6400 rpm
See all for sale
Unlimited Sport 4dr SUV 4WD features & specs
Unlimited Sport 4dr SUV 4WD
3.6L 6cyl 6M
MSRP$31,975
MPG 17 city / 23 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission6-speed manual
Horsepower285 hp @ 6400 rpm
See all for sale
See all 2021 Jeep Wrangler specs & features
Ad
Build Your Wrangler
Select Color: 

Safety

Our experts’ favorite Wrangler safety features:

ParkView Rear Back Up Camera
Displays on the center console what is behind you. Rearview cameras aren't new, but they are a welcome addition in the Wrangler.
Blind-Spot and Cross-Path Detection
Warns the driver of other cars in the blind spots and approaching cars from out of the driver's view while in reverse.
ParkSense Rear Park Assist System
Gives audio alerts when approaching objects from the rear, helping to minimize low-speed bumps in parking scenarios.

Jeep Wrangler vs. the competition

Jeep Wrangler vs. Toyota 4Runner

Like the Wrangler, the Toyota 4Runner is available in a variety of trims that range from a focus on on-road comfort to off-road prowess. The top-level TRD Pro is nearly as capable as the Wrangler Rubicon for roughly the same cost. The 4Runner has more cargo and passenger space than the Wrangler, but it doesn't offer any optional powertrains like the Wrangler.

Compare Jeep Wrangler & Toyota 4Runner features

Jeep Wrangler vs. Land Rover Defender

The new Defender replaces a model that was several decades old and can trace its roots back nearly as far as the Wranglers. It's significantly more expensive than a base Wrangler, but it offers a solid level of off-road capability out of the gate. Expect a higher level of interior refinement from the Defender.

Compare Jeep Wrangler & Land Rover Defender features

Jeep Wrangler vs. Jeep Gladiator

Simply put, the Gladiator is a Wrangler with a bed instead of an enclosed cargo area. It's much longer, which means it's not quite as nimble as the Wrangler off-road. Also, it's currently only available with the 3.6-liter V6. That said, it will do just about anything a Wrangler will do, so if you want an off-roader with the added utility of a truck, it's hard to go wrong with the Gladiator.

Compare Jeep Wrangler & Jeep Gladiator features

Related Wrangler Articles

FAQ

Is the Jeep Wrangler a good car?

The Edmunds experts tested the 2021 Wrangler both on the road and at the track, giving it a 7.8 out of 10. You probably care about Jeep Wrangler fuel economy, so it's important to know that the Wrangler gets an EPA-estimated 19 mpg to 23 mpg, depending on the configuration. What about cargo capacity? When you're thinking about carrying stuff in your new car, keep in mind that carrying capacity for the Wrangler ranges from 12.9 to 31.7 cubic feet of trunk space. And then there's safety and reliability. Edmunds has all the latest NHTSA and IIHS crash-test scores, plus industry-leading expert and consumer reviews to help you understand what it's like to own and maintain a Jeep Wrangler. Learn more

What's new in the 2021 Jeep Wrangler?

According to Edmunds’ car experts, here’s what’s new for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler:

  • New Wrangler 4xe plug-in hybrid version; new Islander and 80th Anniversary special editions
  • Optional forward-facing camera for off-roading
  • Available full-time four-wheel drive for Rubicon
  • Rubicon 392 introduced with a 470-horsepower V8
  • Part of the fourth Wrangler generation introduced for 2018
Learn more

Is the Jeep Wrangler reliable?

To determine whether the Jeep Wrangler is reliable, read Edmunds' authentic consumer reviews, which come from real owners and reveal what it's like to live with the Wrangler. Look for specific complaints that keep popping up in the reviews, and be sure to compare the Wrangler's average consumer rating to that of competing vehicles. Learn more

Is the 2021 Jeep Wrangler a good car?

There's a lot to consider if you're wondering whether the 2021 Jeep Wrangler is a good car. Edmunds' expert testing team reviewed the 2021 Wrangler and gave it a 7.8 out of 10. Safety scores, fuel economy, cargo capacity and feature availability should all be factors in determining whether the 2021 Wrangler is a good car for you. Learn more

How much should I pay for a 2021 Jeep Wrangler?

The least-expensive 2021 Jeep Wrangler is the 2021 Jeep Wrangler Sport 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M). Including destination charge, it arrives with a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of about $28,475.

Other versions include:

  • Unlimited Rubicon 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $42,195
  • Unlimited Sport S 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $35,175
  • Unlimited Sahara 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $38,645
  • Unlimited Sport 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $31,975
  • Unlimited Willys 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $37,670
  • Unlimited Sahara Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $42,120
  • Unlimited Sport Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $36,690
  • Sport 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $28,475
  • Sport S 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $31,675
  • Unlimited High Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) which starts at $49,430
  • Rubicon 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $38,875
  • Unlimited Willys Sport 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $33,675
  • Willys 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $34,170
  • Willys Sport 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $30,175
  • Islander 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $33,370
  • Unlimited 80th Edition 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) which starts at $39,670
  • Unlimited Freedom 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $38,370
  • 80th Edition 2dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) which starts at $36,170
  • Freedom 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $34,870
  • Unlimited Islander 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $36,870
  • Unlimited High Altitude 4XE 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo gas/electric hybrid 8A) which starts at $53,570
  • Unlimited Rubicon 4XE 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo gas/electric hybrid 8A) which starts at $51,695
  • Unlimited Sahara 4XE 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo gas/electric hybrid 8A) which starts at $47,995
Learn more

What are the different models of Jeep Wrangler?

If you're interested in the Jeep Wrangler, the next question is, which Wrangler model is right for you? Wrangler variants include Unlimited Rubicon 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited Sport S 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited Sahara 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), and Unlimited Sport 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M). For a full list of Wrangler models, check out Edmunds’ Features & Specs page. Learn more

More about the 2021 Jeep Wrangler

2021 Jeep Wrangler Overview

The 2021 Jeep Wrangler is offered in the following submodels: Wrangler SUV, Wrangler Hybrid. Available styles include Unlimited Rubicon 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited Sport S 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited Sahara 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited Sport 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited Willys 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited Sahara Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited Sport Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Sport 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Sport S 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited High Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A), Rubicon 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited Willys Sport 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Willys 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Willys Sport 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Islander 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited 80th Edition 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A), Unlimited Freedom 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), 80th Edition 2dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A), Freedom 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited Islander 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M), Unlimited High Altitude 4XE 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo gas/electric hybrid 8A), Unlimited Rubicon 4XE 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo gas/electric hybrid 8A), and Unlimited Sahara 4XE 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo gas/electric hybrid 8A).

What do people think of the 2021 Jeep Wrangler?

Consumer ratings and reviews are also available for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler and all its trim types. Overall, Edmunds users rate the 2021 Wrangler 5.0 on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. Edmunds consumer reviews allow users to sift through aggregated consumer reviews to understand what other drivers are saying about any vehicle in our database. Detailed rating breakdowns (including performance, comfort, value, interior, exterior design, build quality, and reliability) are available as well to provide shoppers with a comprehensive understanding of why customers like the 2021 Wrangler.

Edmunds Expert Reviews

Edmunds experts have compiled a robust series of ratings and reviews for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler and all model years in our database. Our rich content includes expert reviews and recommendations for the 2021 Wrangler featuring deep dives into trim levels and features, performance, mpg, safety, interior, and driving. Edmunds also offers expert ratings, road test and performance data, long-term road tests, first-drive reviews, video reviews and more.

Our Review Process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.

What's a good price for a New 2021 Jeep Wrangler?

2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A)

The 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $45,720. The average price paid for a new 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) is trending $3,403 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,403 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $42,317.

The average savings for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) is 7.4% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 32 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M)

The 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $44,930. The average price paid for a new 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) is trending $3,125 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,125 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $41,805.

The average savings for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) is 7% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 184 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A)

The 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $43,540. The average price paid for a new 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) is trending $3,252 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,252 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $40,288.

The average savings for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) is 7.5% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 84 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport S 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M)

The 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport S 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $38,800. The average price paid for a new 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport S 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) is trending $2,899 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $2,899 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $35,901.

The average savings for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport S 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) is 7.5% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 43 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport S 4dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Willys 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A)

The 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Willys 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $42,200. The average price paid for a new 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Willys 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) is trending $2,930 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $2,930 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $39,270.

The average savings for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Willys 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) is 6.9% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 18 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Willys 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A)

The 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $42,655. The average price paid for a new 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) is trending $3,023 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,023 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $39,632.

The average savings for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) is 7.1% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 17 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport Altitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Islander 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A)

The 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Islander 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $41,400. The average price paid for a new 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Islander 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) is trending $2,823 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $2,823 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $38,577.

The average savings for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Islander 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) is 6.8% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 14 2021 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Islander 4dr SUV 4WD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 8A) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2021 Jeep Wrangler Islander 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M)

The 2021 Jeep Wrangler Islander 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $36,400. The average price paid for a new 2021 Jeep Wrangler Islander 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) is trending $2,655 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $2,655 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $33,745.

The average savings for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler Islander 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) is 7.3% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 11 2021 Jeep Wrangler Islander 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2021 Jeep Wrangler Sport S 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M)

The 2021 Jeep Wrangler Sport S 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $36,150. The average price paid for a new 2021 Jeep Wrangler Sport S 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) is trending $2,195 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $2,195 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $33,955.

The average savings for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler Sport S 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) is 6.1% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 11 2021 Jeep Wrangler Sport S 2dr SUV 4WD (3.6L 6cyl 6M) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

Which 2021 Jeep Wranglers are available in my area?

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2021 Jeep Wrangler for sale near. There are currently 1002 new 2021 Wranglers listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $31,350 and mileage as low as 0 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a car from our massive database to find cheap vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the 2021 Jeep Wrangler. Then select Edmunds special offers, perks, deals, and incentives to contact the dealer of your choice and save up to $14,634 on a used or CPO 2021 Wrangler available from a dealership near you.

Can't find a new 2021 Jeep Wranglers you want in your area? Consider a broader search.

Find a new Jeep for sale - 8 great deals out of 17 listings starting at $16,000.

Why trust Edmunds?

Edmunds has deep data on over 6 million new, used, and certified pre-owned vehicles, including rich, trim-level features and specs information like: MSRP, average price paid, warranty information (basic, drivetrain, and maintenance), features (upholstery, bluetooth, navigation, heated seating, cooled seating, cruise control, parking assistance, keyless ignition, satellite radio, folding rears seats ,run flat tires, wheel type, tire size, wheel tire, sunroof, etc.), vehicle specifications (engine cylinder count, drivetrain, engine power, engine torque, engine displacement, transmission), fuel economy (city, highway, combined, fuel capacity, range), vehicle dimensions (length, width, seating capacity, cargo space), car safety, true cost to own. Edmunds also provides tools to allow shopper to compare vehicles to similar models of their choosing by warranty, interior features, exterior features, specifications, fuel economy, vehicle dimensions, consumer rating, edmunds rating, and color.

Should I lease or buy a 2021 Jeep Wrangler?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

Check out Jeep lease specials