Used 2007 Toyota Avalon Review

The superbly refined 2007 Toyota Avalon is about as good as it gets this side of $40,000. It's essentially a luxury sedan without the luxury badge.




what's new

The Toyota Avalon remains largely unchanged for the 2007 model year. All models now have tire-pressure sensors, and a navigation system is now available on the Touring trim.

vehicle overview

For much of its life, the Toyota Avalon has fit this description: short on excitement, but solid, roomy and dependable. Thanks to a full redesign a couple of years ago, however, you can't really call this large sedan boring. It may not be as exciting as a Chrysler 300, but it does have a 268-horsepower V6 and enough luxury-themed features to make it seem like a Lexus but without the L-shaped badge.

Because it was engineered from its top to its tires in the U.S., Toyota calls the Avalon its "most American" car yet. And as one would expect, "more American" means it's bigger, roomier and more powerful. Rear passengers even benefit from a flat floor and seats that recline up to 10 degrees. The overall feel is much more upscale than that of your average Toyota car. In the past, the Avalon was so similar to the Toyota Camry that the price difference was hard to justify. That's no longer the case with the latest Toyota Avalon, which offers more room, more power and more luxury than most Camry owners can imagine. If you're shopping for a full-size sedan, you owe it to yourself to try a 2007 Toyota Avalon. If relaxation and refinement are high on your list, Toyota's big sedan won't disappoint.

trim levels & features

A large sedan, the 2007 Toyota Avalon is available in four trim levels: XL, Touring, XLS and Limited. Although it's the base version, the XL still offers such amenities as electroluminescent gauges, a cabin air filter, a CD player, automatic climate control, a tilt/telescoping wheel, a power seat and 16-inch alloy wheels. The Touring model is noticeably sportier, with a firmer suspension, unique 17-inch wheels, leather seats, a power passenger seat and aluminum interior trim. The XLS and Limited are more upscale; the XLS adds a power moonroof, heated outside mirrors and a six-disc CD changer. The Limited includes such items as rain-sensing wipers; perforated leather seats with memory, heating and cooling; wood grain trim; a power rear sunshade; a keyless startup system; and a premium 12-speaker JBL stereo. Many of the upscale features on the XLS and Limited are also available as options on the lower trims. Other options, depending on trim level, include a navigation system, satellite radio and adaptive cruise control.

performance & mpg

The front-wheel-drive Toyota Avalon is powered by a 3.5-liter V6 providing 268 hp and 248 pound-feet of torque. Toyota's full-size sedan needs just 6.9 seconds to reach 60 mph. A five-speed automatic is the only transmission offered. The EPA estimates that the Avalon will deliver 22 miles per gallon city and 31 highway, with a combined average of 26 miles per gallon -- impressive numbers for a full-size sedan with a powerful V6.

safety

Side airbags for front passengers are standard, along with side curtain airbags for front and rear passengers and a driver-side knee airbag. Traction and stability control systems, along with a brake assist system that detects emergency braking and applies maximum pressure to reduce stopping distances, are optional. All 2007 Toyota Avalon models have antilock disc brakes and a tire-pressure monitoring system. In IIHS testing, the Avalon earned a top score of "Good" for its protection of occupants in frontal-offset and side-impact crashes.

driving

As full-size sedans go, the 2007 Toyota Avalon is rewarding to drive. Not surprisingly, it really shines on the open highway. The cabin remains quiet, the V6 engine has plenty of passing power and the suspension, even with the firmer underpinnings of the Touring package, never feels harsh. The Avalon is no athlete, but this Toyota car carries itself with a great deal of composure on winding roads. Additionally, a tidy turning radius makes it feel unexpectedly nimble on tight city streets.

interior

The XLS and Limited models are modern and luxurious, while the sporty Touring model is intentionally austere, with black leather seats and a three-spoke steering wheel. The instrument cluster is highlighted by glowing Optitron gauges surrounded by chrome rings, and movable panels that conceal the radio and navigation controls give the dash a sleek look. The front seats are wide and accommodating. The rear seats are more comfortable than in the previous Avalon, thanks to limo levels of legroom and a manually reclining back cushion. A 6-footer can sit in back with more than enough knee and headroom, and with a nearly flat floor, getting three across on carpool day is no problem.

edmunds expert review process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.