2017 Hyundai Elantra

2017 Hyundai Elantra Review

More than economical, the 2017 Hyundai Elantra is an upscale compact car with lots to like.
author
by Travis Langness
Edmunds Editor

Fully redesigned for 2017, the Hyundai Elantra gets a fresh new look, three new engines and a slew of impressive tech features. The 2017 Elantra is classier looking on the outside and more refined on the inside than ever before.

For starters, ride quality has been improved, making the Elantra more livable during daily driving. The Elantra's three new engines include a new base 2.0-liter engine, a turbocharged 1.4-liter engine tuned for fuel economy, and a sporty 1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder designed to raise pulses. Unfortunately, with a few early tests of the Elantra, we've found acceleration to be behind that of class leaders. Somehow that doesn't feel like such a big letdown, though, thanks to qualities such as a quiet cabin and a long list of tech features. At the top trim levels you can get items such as adaptive cruise control, lane departure intervention and forward collision mitigation. But no matter how you equip it, the 2017 Hyundai Elantra is as good as it's ever been and it's a strong contender in the compact car segment.



what's new

The Hyundai Elantra has been completely redesigned for 2017. Highlights include fresh styling, three new engines, a new seven-speed dual-clutch transmission, a more upscale interior and a host of new technology offerings.

we recommend

Though the entry-level Elantra SE doesn't have an abundance of standard equipment, if you add the Popular Equipment package you'll get some very desirable tech upgrades and you'll keep your monthly payments pretty low. That's the Elantra we'd get.

The Popular equipment package adds stuff such as Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, satellite radio and a rearview camera. And if that's not enough, you can always upgrade to the Value Edition, which includes blind-spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, heated front seats and dual-zone automatic climate control.





trim levels & features

The 2017 Hyundai Elantra is a four-door compact sedan offered in four main trim levels: SE, Eco, Limited and Sport.

As the base trim level, the SE is sparsely equipped, especially if you get it with the standard six-speed manual transmission. It comes with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine (147 horsepower, 132 pound-feet of torque), 15-inch steel wheels, air-conditioning, full power accessories, cloth upholstery, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, a 60/40-split folding rear seatback, and a six-speaker sound system with satellite radio and a CD player.

Automatic-transmission SE models also offer a Popular Equipment package that adds a lot of desirable features. It's our recommendation for the one to buy if you're getting into an Elantra. It includes 16-inch alloy wheels, heated side mirrors, automatic headlights, cruise control, a 7-inch touchscreen (but no CD player), a rearview camera, Bluetooth connectivity, and smartphone integration with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.

With the Popular Equipment package added, you can also get the SE with the Tech package. Those extras include LED daytime running lights, keyless ignition and entry, a hands-free trunk opener, blind-spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, heated front seats and dual-zone automatic climate control.

Next up in the Elantra lineup is the SE Value Edition. It's basically an SE with all of the above included as standard. It also has a sunroof.

The most fuel-efficient model in the lineup is appropriately named the Eco. It comes with the same equipment as the Value Edition but with 15-inch alloy wheels and without the sunroof. It also adds a turbocharged 1.4-liter engine (128 hp, 156 lb-ft) paired to a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission.

To maximize the number of creature comforts in your Elantra, there's the Limited model. It comes with everything found on the Value Edition (including the standard 2.0-liter engine), plus 17-inch alloy wheels, additional chrome body trim, adaptive xenon headlights, LED taillights, leather upholstery, a power-adjustable driver seat (with power lumbar adjustment), Hyundai's Blue Link system and a second (charge-only) USB port.

Limited models have two options packages: the Limited Tech package and the Limited Ultimate package. The Limited Tech package adds a sunroof, heated rear seats, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a bigger driver information display, an 8-inch touchscreen, voice commands, a navigation system and an eight-speaker Infinity sound system. The Limited Ultimate package (which requires the Limited Tech package) bundles adaptive cruise control, forward collision warning and mitigation, lane departure warning and intervention, automatic high beams and driver-seat memory settings.

For a more powerful and sporty version of the Elantra, there's the aptly named Sport. It is equipped similar to the Limited, but it has a turbocharged 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine (201 hp, 195 lb-ft), a six-speed manual transmission (the seven-speed dual-clutch automatic is optional), 18-inch alloy wheels, sport-tuned suspension and steering, bigger brakes, special front and rear fascias, xenon headlights, and some interior touches such as alloy pedals and a black headliner. The Sport Premium package essentially adds the same equipment as the Limited Tech package.



trim tested

Each vehicle typically comes in multiple versions, although trim levels share many aspects. The ratings in this review are based on our full test of the 2017 Hyundai Elantra Eco (turbo 1.4L inline-4 | 7-speed automatic | FWD).

Edmunds Scorecard

Overall

Driving

Your driving experience with the Elantra will largely depend on which trim level and engine you choose. The seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission is a bit clunky, but handling and braking are better than average.

Acceleration

The standard 2.0-liter engine is disappointing, with some of the slowest 0-60 mph times in the class, while the Eco has good midrange power and is a bit faster. Expect the Sport to be significantly quicker.

Braking

The SE, Value Edition and Eco come with less sophisticated rear drum brakes, but on the whole the brakes perform with consistency. The pedal feel is good, and stopping power is easy to modulate.

Steering

There's not much feel to be had through the steering wheel, but that doesn't take away from its accuracy. The modes (Normal, Eco and Sport) don't differ very much from one another, but Sport makes the Elantra's already strangely heavy steering almost comically difficult.

Comfort

The Elantra is quiet, with comfortable front seats and an above-average ride quality. The Sport model will likely be a bit rougher around the edges, but overall this is a pretty cushy compact sedan.

Seat comfort

Most trim levels come with cloth upholstery, and even without power adjustment (which is optional), the seats are accommodating and comfortable. The cloth offers enough grip to hold you in place and does not look or feel down-market.

Ride comfort

The base SE and Eco trim levels both come with tall sidewalls on their tires. These tires absorb so many of the commonly encountered road irregularities. When the road is smooth and the speeds are high, however, the Elantra could use some better body control, especially in the rear.

Noise & vibration

The Elantra is largely free of wind noise and vibration, even at elevated highway speeds. The tires, too, are quiet and keep unwanted ride harshness from the cabin.

Interior

The Elantra's interior is definitely a top selling point. It's well built, attractive and spacious. In addition, the controls are logically placed, and getting in and out is a breeze.

Ease of use

The Elantra's cabin is well laid out and easy to use. There's not much visual clutter, the buttons are all well marked, and the center screen is easy to read. The gauges are bright and simple as well, so they are easy to read at a glance.

Getting in/getting out

The door openings are sizable, so it's easy to get in and out of the Elantra for both front and rear seat passengers.

Driving position

With six-way-adjustable seating and a long-reaching telescoping steering column, the driving position can be tailored to suit a wide variety of people. It's easy to get comfortable behind the wheel with few adjustments.

Roominess

The compact Elantra makes good use of space and gives the driver and passengers plenty of room. Two passengers in the rear seat should find enough space and good visibility, but adding a third might cause some discomfort.

Visibility

The low hood and thin windshield pillars give you good forward visibility, and the side windows are big enough to easily check your blind spot. The slightly high trunk line is a bit tough to see over, but the rearview camera alleviates that problem when parking.

Quality

Fit and finish in the Elantra is on par with the class leaders. Material quality is generally good, even though you'll find some hard plastics here and there. Even the base cloth seats do not feel or look cheap, and the various buttons and knobs work smoothly.

Utility

A large trunk, plenty of small item storage in the cabin, and decent room in the back for child safety seats make the Elantra very utilitarian. Competitors, however, offer hatchback configurations that offer more space.

Small-item storage

There's no shortage of door storage, cupholders or other compartments in the Elantra. Just below the center console is a concealable compartment to plug in and hide your phone or sunglasses.

Cargo space

Access to the trunk is good, the liftover height is low and the 14.4 cubic feet of storage is near the top of its class. Split-and-folding rear seats give you added flexibility, though you won't be hauling anything too large because of the sedan body style.

Child safety seat accommodation

Good access to the rear seats, along with good rear seat legroom, makes for easy installation.

edmunds expert review process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.