2018 Infiniti Q60

2018 INFINITI Q60 Review

The optional twin-turbo V6 gives the Q60 the thrust to back up its dramatic looks.
author
by Jason Kavanagh
Edmunds Editor

Edmunds expert review

The 2018 Infiniti Q60 can trace its roots back to the G35 (remember that car?), one of several vehicles built on Nissan's then-new FM platform. Though many changes have been phased in along the way, today's Q60 is still built on the FM platform. It has served Nissan and Infiniti well, spawning a host of SUVs, a sports car, sedans and coupes.

Today, the Q60 still manages to feel contemporary, though the interior betrays its older roots. The two screens in the center stack are from different eras, and the map graphics are dated. Still, this coupe's plentiful soft touch points show attention to detail, even if the theme could stand to be overhauled.

The Q60's top version is the Red Sport 400. Though it isn't as focused as German high-performance offerings, its twin-turbo V6 provides legitimate 400-horsepower thrust. There's also strong value to be found in the lower trim levels if your performance expectations are more relaxed.

Overall, we think the Q60 is a respectable choice for a luxury coupe. But given that it doesn't shine in any particular area, you might find fresher rivals such as the Audi A5/S5 and Mercedes-Benz C-Class coupe more appealing.



What's new for 2018

For 2018, the Infiniti Q60 receives only minor tweaks. Red Sport 400 models get 20-inch wheels with non-run-flat tires, while tires that are 10 mm wider have been fitted across the lineup.

We recommend

The sweet spot is the 3.0t Sport trim level. It offers a proper dose of thrust over the four-cylinder without reaching the ambitious price point of the Red Sport 400. We also like the Sport trim for its upgraded front seats and adaptive suspension dampers. Beware: All option packages require the Sensory package, itself a pricey way to get heated seats and navigation, among other features. Getting the ProAssist package is likely worthwhile for its added safety features. You get even more with the ProActive package, but it comes bundled with Infiniti's Direct Adaptive Steering system. We don't like the way the car's steering feels and responds when so equipped, so that could be a package to avoid.




Trim levels & features

The 2018 Infiniti Q60 is a two-door luxury coupe that seats four people. There are five trim levels: 2.0t Pure, 2.0t Luxe, 3.0t Luxe, 3.0t Sport and Red Sport 400. The numbers reference what engine the Q60 gets, while Pure, Luxe and Sport versions deliver different feature seats. All Q60s are equipped with a seven-speed automatic transmission and rear-wheel drive. All-wheel drive is optional.

The base 2.0t Pure is equipped with a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine (208 horsepower, 258 pound-feet of torque) and comes pretty well-equipped. Highlights include 19-inch alloy wheels, LED headlights and foglights, heated mirrors, keyless ignition and entry, dual-zone automatic climate control, power-adjustable front seats, simulated leather upholstery, Bluetooth, a dual-touchscreen infotainment interface (8-inch upper screen, 7-inch lower), two USB ports, and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player and satellite radio. A sunroof is optional.

Stepping up to the 2.0t Luxe adds the sunroof plus a 13-speaker Bose audio system that includes HD radio. The 3.0t Luxe, the starting point for six-cylinder models, differs only through the substitution of the four-cylinder with a turbocharged 3.0-liter V6 engine (300 hp, 295 lb-ft) and larger brakes.

While Luxe models don't bestow much additional standard equipment, they grant access to options not available on the base model. The Sensory package adds auto-dimming outside mirrors, a power-adjustable and heated steering wheel, heated front seats, driver-seat memory settings, and Infiniti InTouch emergency communications services and navigation system.

The Leather Seating package adds leather upholstery and power-adjustable front seat side bolsters. The ProAssist package adds front and rear parking sensors, a 360-degree parking camera system, blind-spot monitoring, reverse automatic braking, and a forward collision warning and automatic braking system.

The 3.0t Luxe is available with the ProActive package (requires all other available packages), which adds adaptive headlights with automatic high beams, adaptive cruise control, blind-spot intervention (it steers for you if you don't heed its warnings), a lane departure warning and intervention system, an air filtration system and Infiniti's Direct Adaptive Steering system.

There's also the 3.0t Sport, which comes with 19-inch forged alloy wheels, two-mode variable suspension dampers, the auto-dimming outside mirrors, leather upholstery, the power-adjustable driver seat bolsters and steering wheel, and driver-seat memory functions. Its Sensory package is essentially the same as the 3.0t Luxe version apart from those items already standard. It too can be equipped with the ProAssist and ProActive packages.

The Red Sport 400 sits atop the Q60 lineup and delivers the most potent performance of any Q60 variant. It's equipped similarly to the 3.0t Sport but has a more powerful 3.0-liter V6 engine (400 hp, 350 lb-ft) and 20-inch wheels with staggered summer tires.



Trim tested

Edmunds has not yet rated this vehicle, but we have limited experience with a preproduction model. The following is our first take on what's significant about it and what you can expect. These observations are based on our initial drive of the2017 Infiniti Q60 Red Sport 400 (turbo 3.0L V6 | 7-speed automatic | RWD).

Driving

The Red Sport's engine is outstanding and has plenty of power for all occasions. We're less fond of the optional Direct Adaptive Steering system, which feels overly disconnected and artificial. The Q60's handling is secure.

Comfort

The seats are good for road trips, though tall folks will find the seating position on the high side. The ride is firm but never harsh, and the damping is spot-on at higher speeds. The tires transmit what little noise is heard in the cabin.

Interior

You'll find an unusually high number of materials in the cabin but plenty of soft touch points. Access to the front seats is easy and space is plentiful — not so much for the back seats, which are too small to really be usable.

Utility

The trunk is small, even for a luxury coupe. There aren't many places in the cabin to swallow normal clutter, just cupholders, a modest console bin and shallow, plasticky door pockets.

Technology

The dual-screen layout is showing its age, with the map graphics looking out-of-date and the screens apparently from different eras. The lower touchscreen gives quick responses and has a reasonably intuitive screen flow. Many gray icons on certain screens are puzzling.

Edmunds expert review process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.