Used 2010 GMC Acadia Review

Like its platform-mates from Buick, Chevy and Saturn, the three-row 2010 GMC Acadia offers an enviable combination of comfort and cargo space, with decent performance to boot.

what's new

The 2010 GMC Acadia gets new "Cashmere" leather upholstery on upscale models, slightly revised trim levels, standard 20-inch wheels on the top-of-the-line model and a USB jack for the optional Bose stereo. The six-speed transmission has also been reprogrammed for quicker downshifts.

vehicle overview

As one of four siblings, the 2010 GMC Acadia has its work cut out for it in standing out from the rest of the family. But the Acadia does have some attractive qualities relative to its platform-mates, even though we're not convinced that GM really needs to make four different versions of its large crossover SUV. The Acadia is less luxurious than the Buick Enclave, but it's cheaper, too, and its interior is nicer than the Chevy Traverse and Saturn Outlook.

In any case, the Acadia is every bit as capable as the others, which means it's one of the top choices among three-row large crossover SUVs. Blessed with unibody architecture as opposed to heavier and less carlike body-on-frame construction, the Acadia boasts superior handling, interior packaging and crashworthiness relative to traditional full-size SUVs. GMC's big crossover also offers a smooth and powerful direct-injected V6 engine and it's available with either front- or all-wheel drive. Its smooth ride is a boon for road-tripping families, as is its available rear-seat entertainment system. And unless you want a minivan, a Suburban is pretty much the only vehicle that can top the Acadia's whopping 117 cubic feet of maximum cargo space.

Like any vehicle, the 2010 GMC Acadia has its share of drawbacks. First of all, while the interior is attractively designed, its materials leave something to be desired. Also, the third row isn't as comfortable as that of the Ford Flex (an issue endemic to GM's crossover-SUV quartet), nor is its outward visibility as good as the Flex's. Lastly, some of our editors have panned the Acadia for feeling a bit ponderous on the road relative to nimbler (but smaller) rivals.

There are lots of crossover flavors available, though, so make sure you sample some others, too. The Flex, Hyundai Veracruz and Mazda CX-9 are all worth test-driving, and if you're open to the idea of a minivan, Honda's Odyssey is the best of its breed. Don't forget about the Acadia's GM siblings, too: They're similar enough that superior incentives could be the deciding factor. Overall, though, the 2010 GMC Acadia's strengths greatly outweigh its weaknesses, and it certainly belongs on your short list of large crossover SUVs.

performance & mpg

The 2010 GMC Acadia is available with either front-wheel or all-wheel drive. Power comes from a 3.6-liter V6 that cranks out 288 horsepower and 270 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission is standard, and it's been updated for 2010 with noticeably more responsive downshifts. The front-drive Acadia is EPA-rated at 17 mpg city/24 mpg highway and 19 mpg combined, while all-wheel drive lowers those numbers a smidge to 16/23/19. The Acadia's towing capacity is a useful 4,500 pounds when properly equipped.


Standard safety features on the 2010 GMC Acadia include antilock disc brakes, stability control, front-seat side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. In crash tests, the Acadia ran the table, scoring a perfect five stars in government frontal- and side-impact testing as well as the top "Good" rating in the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety's frontal-offset and side-impact testing.


The 2010 GMC Acadia is pleasant enough to drive, but it feels big -- and it is big, with a curb weight not too far south of 5,000 pounds. However, most people will probably forgive the Acadia's somewhat ponderous handling given its capacious interior. The optional 19- and 20-inch wheels look great (well, except for the chrome ones), but they hurt the Acadia's otherwise comfortable ride. We have no complaints about the smooth and powerful 3.6-liter V6.


The Acadia's attractive dashboard layout features sensible controls and decent build quality, though signs of lower-grade plastics and questionable assembly can be found. A third-row seat is standard along with second-row captain's chairs, all of which fold flat. The optional 60/40-split second-row bench expands seating capacity to eight. Access to the third row is facilitated by the wide rear doors and a sliding second-row seat. Overall third-row roominess is pretty good as large SUVs go, though the Ford Flex does hold an edge on comfort for two adult passengers.

Maximum cargo capacity in the Acadia is an enormous 117 cubic feet available with all seats down -- not quite minivan-grade, but more than enough for most consumers. There's a respectable 24 cubic feet behind the third-row seat alone, so many hauling duties can be handled without folding any of the seats.

edmunds expert review process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.