Midsize trucks

Midsize trucks are a good introduction to the world of pickups. Small cabs and short beds make them relatively easy to maneuver in parking lots and urban centers. Even the crew cabs don't have a ton of rear legroom, but most passengers will be comfortable on trips around town.
2021 Honda Ridgeline
1
Redesigned in 2017

Honda Ridgeline

MSRP
$36,490 - $43,920
Edmunds Rating
8.5 out of 10
Combined MPG
21
2021 Jeep Gladiator
2
Introduced in 2020

Jeep Gladiator

MSRP
$34,040 - $51,995
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
19
2021 Toyota Tacoma
3
Redesigned in 2016

Toyota Tacoma

MSRP
$26,400 - $47,030
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
Combined MPG
18 - 21


Large trucks

Large trucks are among the most versatile vehicles on the market. The crew cabs are positively gigantic; even tall rear-seat passengers won't come close to brushing their hair on the headliner or bumping against the seat in front. Be prepared for a seemingly endless list of configurations and options.
1
Top Rated vehicle
Redesigned in 2021

Ford F-150

MSRP
$29,290 - $74,600
Edmunds Rating
8.5 out of 10
Combined MPG
19 - 22
2
Redesigned in 2019

Ram 1500

MSRP
$32,795 - $70,195
Edmunds Rating
8.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
12 - 23
3
Redesigned in 2019

GMC Sierra 1500

MSRP
$30,100 - $59,600
Edmunds Rating
7.4 out of 10
Combined MPG
17 - 24


Heavy-duty trucks

Heavy-duty trucks are immensely capable workhorses that live to tow. They trade passenger comfort for outright towing ability, though you can still outfit them with all the luxuries and options of their full-size siblings.
1
Redesigned in 2019

Ram 2500

MSRP
$34,095 - $66,335
Edmunds Rating
7.9 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available
2
Redesigned in 2017

Ford F-250 Super Duty

MSRP
$34,230 - $84,390
Edmunds Rating
7.7 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available
3
Redesigned in 2020

GMC Sierra 2500HD

MSRP
$35,900 - $65,100
Edmunds Rating
7.5 out of 10
Combined MPG
Not available



Edmunds' experts test 200 vehicles per year on our test track. We also test them using a 115-mile real-world test loop of city streets, freeways and winding canyons. The data we gather results in our ratings. They’re based on 30-plus scores that cover performance, comfort, interior, technology, utility and value.


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Top Selling Trucks of
2016

Vehicles included in the data set are exclusively retail registrations to individuals and do not include rental sales or registrations from government bodies*

  1. Chevrolet
    520,495
  2. Ford
    512,411
  3. Ram
    347,296
  4. Toyota
    282,405
  5. GMC
    210,167
year
20162020
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Video reviews

SPEAKER: It's been over a decade since we were behind the wheel of an all-new redesigned Tundra, almost 15 years, but finally, we're here. We're behind the wheel. We're going to drive one on the road and tell you all about it. [MUSIC PLAYING] Consistently in America, there are three automakers that sell the top one, two, and three best-selling vehicles, the Ford F-150, the Ram 1500, and the Chevy Silverado 1500, and this one aims to eat a little bit of their lunch. The Tundra is redesigned with a new frame, a new engine under the hood, and all-new looks. But we want to find out if it's got what it takes to compete with the big three and also what it's like compared to the old one because, man, that truck was around for a long time. For more information on the Tundra, all of its competitors be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel. We appreciate it. And if you want to cash off on your car today, go to edmunds.com/sellmycar, especially if you want to get into something brand-new like this. Before I get into the nitty gritty of the, how does it drive, what's the engine feel like, Ryan, one of my coworkers at Edmunds, did a great first look video on the Tundra where he goes really deep in-depth with the buttons, the knobs, how things work here in the center console. I'll touch on that lightly, but if you want a deeper dive, check out Ryan's video below. Now let's talk about what's under the hood. This particular Tundra that I'm driving has the standard V6. They call it the i-Force V6. It's 3 and 1/2 liters, and it's got more power than the outgoing V8. There is no more V8 for the Tundra. It's gone, bye-bye, so if you don't want this one, you'll have to wait a little while. There will be a hybrid version of the 3.5-liter V6, and it'll have even more power. It'll come standard on the TRD Pro, and it'll be optional in some of the upper trim levels, but it's also got a 10 speed automatic transmission, which is another big change for Toyota in the powertrain department. How does it feel? Well, it's pretty gutsy for a large truck. It doesn't inspire any, oh, it's going crazy fast moments, but it's got good acceleration. This is still a pretty heavy truck, and sub 400 horsepower territory means it's plenty enough to tow and haul and good enough to get you up to speed, but it's not going to light the tires on fire. So far in the driving experience I've had with this truck, it shifts well, crisp. Going up grades, it's not hunting for gears. A lot of times, you worry about with a transmission that's got a lot of gears, will it be shifting around a lot? It seems like Toyota has kind of nailed out the logic on that, and it's shifting reasonably well. Also when you pop it over into sport mode like that, you can select the gear and start to hear a little bit of the engine note, which I like a little bit. We're pulling up to a red light now, but it sounds pretty good for a V6, which is saying something because V6s typically don't sound great. So the V6 is only a little bit more powerful than the outgoing V8, but it does have the benefit of being attached to a 10 speed transmission, which means it can shift into a more appropriate gear for the task it's doing, and it means that you're not going to get as much engine noise when you're on the highway. That was one of my biggest complaints with the old Tundra is, it would rev pretty high, and you'd hear that engine a lot, especially when you're going 70, 75 out on the open road. Now in this one, I spent some considerable time on the highway, didn't get any of that engine noise. But there was considerable wind noise from these side mirrors. They're pretty big. It's not great. Now, I didn't have any music going. I wanted to hear the inside of the truck. I'm sure if I turned up the tunes a little bit, I could drown that out. Another big part of the Tundra that's changed is the frame. They've gone with a fully boxed frame, changing from the previous generation that did not have that. They've caught up, essentially, with the rest of the full size truck market in that sense, but they've leaped forward in terms of rear suspension. Instead of leaf springs, you get coil springs, which actually kind of smooths out the ride a little bit in the rear and makes handling a little bit better. The truck doesn't have as much weight down near the suspension to pull it out of line when you're going through a corner, so it feels a little bit more stable. Now, the ride on the highway is still a little bit bumpy. This is a big, heavy, full-size pickup truck, but it's reasonable enough that you could daily drive it without any comfort issues and have a little bit of enjoyment if there's a curve or two in the road. You do get some bounce into the cabin. That's to be expected in the full size class, but the Tundra is certainly more in line with the crop of full sizers today like the F-150 and the Silverado. I would say it falls behind the Ram 1500 in terms of suspension comfort, but I'd have to drive them back to back just to be sure. Then there's modern in-car tech. When I think Toyota trucks, I think big chunky knobs and simple dashboards, but this is throwing that preconception right out the window. All Tundras come with Toyota's Safety Sense 2.5 suite of driver aids, which is essentially a long list of driver aids that includes stuff like lane centering, lane keep assist, adaptive cruise control, and they work pretty well. Now, the beeps are a little bit annoying, in that it can watch-- how dare you, with your driver assist system? [BEEP] And the adaptive cruise control doesn't keep me as close to the car in front of me as I'd like, but it's not all that bad. Honestly, this is a good system. You could live with on a daily basis, and it would help reduce fatigue over long road trips. These trucks will be on the road by the end of 2021. This is a pre-production model that I'm driving, but Toyota says they'll be ready very soon. Unfortunately, you can only get the first few models with the standard V6. If you want the hybrid with much more power and hopefully better fuel economy, you'll have to wait. In terms of fuel economy for this truck, there's two different ratings for four by two and four by four. It's 20 miles per gallon combined for the standard V6, and with four by four, it's 19 miles per gallon combined. Not excellent when you consider that other vehicles in the class have diesel offerings or, Ford for instance, has the PowerBoost offering, which does much better, but acceptable for a full-sized truck. So after some time behind the wheel, this is a big leap forward for Toyota. This truck feels better at pretty much every measurable thing that you can feel about it. It drives better. It accelerates better. It's got a much nicer and I think better laid out interior, but there are still some cheap plastics on the interior. The ride is not as smooth as the Ram 1500. And it doesn't have nearly as many powertrain options as something like the F-150, where you can get the PowerBoost option in the truck. You can get a diesel. You can get a V8. Toyota has simplified things over the years by only having a V8 and, in this truck, having just the V6 and the V6 hybrid. But that means you're going to appeal to fewer buyers, and, in my opinion, that's a drawback of the Tundra. So now we are in the TRD Pro. This one is the big boss. It's got all the suspension goodies and, for the first time in Toyota Tundra history, a locking rear differential. Hey, good job, Toyota. Welcome to the party. Essentially, it physically connects the two rear tires so that you can get further in off-road scenarios where you want one of them to not be slipping, for instance, if you've lost traction. And Toyota's sent us out on this off-road trail, so we're going to see what it's got to offer, see what it's like in terms of rock crawling capability and all that kind of good stuff. But the big difference in this particular trim, TRD Pro is only available with the hybrid, so we're driving the hybrid right now. It's got 430 horsepower and-- roundabouts there, 437, I think, and almost 600 pound feet of torque, 580 something. It's a really torque-y engine, which is a good thing for an off-roader, especially if you want that torque to be low down when you're crawling over obstacles. All right, so we are now engaged in four low. We're doing crawl control, where it regulates the speed uphill for you. I'm avoiding a tree, as per the spotter's instructions. Completely left hand down. I've got a bunch of cameras going on the outside, which is actually pretty cool. All right, now he's going to have me reverse a little bit, and really good resolution on these cameras, too. This is a big, heavy duty truck, and it is going up a really steep hill. Yeah, a little bit of right hand down, so I figured. [MUSIC PLAYING] Crawl control engaged, keeping me from slipping back down the hill. I mean, it's disconcerting to drive something this big up a hill like this, and it's slipping, slipping, but it caught. Crawl control caught, as it was supposed to, and we're through. That was pretty simple. It's also really nice to just have these big screens and a lot of tech, especially when you're in such a big vehicle. It makes off-roading less stressful. Now, the TRD Pro doesn't have the kind of power you get from the RAM TRX, but this is a real good competitor with Ford's Ecoboost engine, their turbocharged V6, and those power numbers are pretty similar. What I'm interested to see is what this is like in a desert running scenario. So what we're going to be doing high speed off roading, a lot of whoops, because I love how the Raptor performs in those situations. But the TRD Pro feels like it's more suited for tight trails and going up really steep, slow climbs. Let's talk about the super red interior on the TRD Pro. We got a lot of comments when the photos and videos first came out about how red the interior is. I don't mind it that much, especially because I'm red-green colorblind, so it just looks like Christmas in here to me. But it's also well-balanced with blacks and a couple of grays and charcoal, heather charcoals in here. It's not too red. So there's no spotter in the articulation section, which I can only venture to guess means I'll do fine. I've got the cameras on and dipping the tire in, a little bit of crawl, just go nice and slow, keeping the wheels straight. Now you hang a wheel up, and it crawls you forward, no problem. I had a rear wheel in the air there, crawl a little bit further, twist it a little bit, no problem. And I'm out of the articulation section. That was easy. All right, so now we get our first towing opportunity with the Tundra, and they've put us in an SR5, which is kind of a base-ish trim with the standard engine and with no optional air suspension, and so it's not great. It's not my favorite towing experience, but it's not bad. It's pretty comfortable, and we're only towing a 3,000 to 4,000 pound trailer, so there's no strain in the engine. One of the things I'm happy to report is that the 10 speed automatic shifts really well with a trailer behind it, at least so far with this small trailer. It's not doing early upshifts. It's not hunting around for gears. You could go on a long uphill grade and probably be just fine. But next, we're going to hop into the other Tundra that they've got here with a much bigger trailer and see how it handles it with the air suspension and the load leveling for the rear, should be an increase in luxurious towing. Now we're in a Platinum Tundra, one of the higher trim levels, and it's got the optional air suspension on it, which levels the rear end when you've got a heavy trailer. And we're towing a trailer that weighs more than twice as much as the first one. This one's almost 8,000 pounds, big dual-axle airstream. Everything seems to be fine. The 10 speed automatic still has good shift logic. It's not upshifting early for me. It's down shifting well on this downhill grade, even with that air suspension in the back. It doesn't bounce as much. You're not getting as jittery of a ride, so if you're towing on a regular basis, you've got something that you're hauling to the same mountain every weekend, or if you really love to go down to the local boat ramp, maybe think about getting one of the versions that has the adaptive air suspension, and your life will be a little bit more comfortable. I do want to touch on the interior a little bit now. If you want a deep dive, again, refer to Ryan's great video, the first look at this truck. He really talks about all the buttons and switches in great detail, but some impressions after driving the vehicle, for starters, the screen doesn't wash out in the sun. I can happily report that even with the sunroof wide open, this is super easy to see. This is now one of my favorite screens in any truck. It's not as functional as some other options, stuff like RAM's Uconnect screen, but this is an excellent layout. It keeps visibility good, and it doesn't intrude on the lower space in the dashboard. So you can still fit your smartphone down here easily, getting down to that area, the smartphone charger, it's kind of a weird place to put it. Every time I load my smartphone here and it starts to charge, you go over a bump, and it shifts, and charging stops again. Putting it flat would have made it easier, plus there's nothing here to cover this up. It's just kind of ugly all the time. And the same is true of these two centers console bits. They're not good looking, and this plastic is going to get scratched up pretty quickly. Thankfully, this is really functional. It is definitely function over eye-catching form. This is one of my favorite parts of the interior. You could put a big Nalgene water bottle in here, a couple of smartphones up here, so I actually really like it, despite not liking to look at it. Great driving position, can see well over the hood, and the best part about sitting here is, you don't have to look at the grille on the front of the truck. Then there's the big mirrors. Now, those were a problem with wind noise on the highway when we were driving here. But it's not that bad. Turn up the stereo, you'll be fine. And they're nice and big, so you can see a lot of stuff out of it. The same is true of all the windows in the truck. Forward visibility is good, except for an average-sized A pillar up front, and you get the cool added benefit of the rear window that rolls down, which I'm sure anybody that's a Toyota fanboy will really enjoy. Seating comfort, great. I could sit in these seats for long hours with no problem, and if it's especially hot out, which it is today in Texas, you can turn on the ventilated seats if you get a truck with that option. And they actually have a pretty powerful fan, so immediately when you sit in the truck, you start to cool off your backside. And one more thing, this row of buttons here, row of buttons here, and row of buttons here, excellent. I really like the placement of the buttons. They fall easily to hand. They're easy to learn, and while they're not made out of the sturdiest materials, I still enjoy their locations, and functionally, the way they work, big fan. Let's talk about what the Tundra does and doesn't have as a result of its redesign. It does have a better ride quality. It's better to drive and steer, and the interior is much nicer. It doesn't have the numbers to quite compete with the best in class rivals, though it doesn't have payload that can stack up to the best in class. For instance, the max payload is just under 2,000 pounds, which is impressive. You can put a lot back here, but top rivals have 1,000 pounds more than that. Then there's the towing. Yes, you can tow as much as 12,000 pounds with the Tundra, but again, top rivals beat it there. Thankfully, the margins pretty small in terms of percentages of difference in towing, and, really, my opinion, if you're towing over 10,000 pounds on a regular basis, you should probably be looking at a heavy duty truck anyways. What it does have back here is a composite bed, standard on all 2022 Tundras, something that they brought in on the '07 Tacoma, but for some reason decided to wait until now to give it to the Tundra. But it is missing some truck gadgets, too, stuff like a multi configurable tailgate or even a power up tailgate. All that aside, the Tundra has caught up quite a bit. [MUSIC PLAYING] Does it still make sense? Will it appeal to you if you like the old Tundra? Absolutely, and glad to say, it's much better than ever before, but I still want to get it in house, put it up against the F-150, the Ram 1500, and the Silverado just to see where all the points fall out. If you want more info about all the trucks in this segment, click the link in the description below, and press subscribe. We got plenty of truck videos coming your way all the time. [MUSIC PLAYING]

2022 Toyota Tundra First Drive | Toyota's Large Pickup Finally Redesigned | Cost, Engine, Towing & More

FAQ

What is the best truck to buy?

Full-size pickup trucks are the most popular vehicles in the United States, and Edmunds' top-ranked large truck is the Ram 1500. This truck offers lots of customization, versatility and utility, along with an extensive list of optional features to make life more comfortable. For more towing and hauling capacity, we recommend the Ram 2500, our top-rated HD pickup truck. Or if you want the utility of a pickup but don't need maximum towing capability, the Honda Ridgeline is our top pick for a smaller truck. Learn more

What is the best 2020 pickup truck?

Our top-rated large pickup truck is the Ram 1500. It should come as no surprise that the Ram offers impressive towing and hauling capabilities. In addition, it has a uniquely comfortable ride for a full-size truck, and a huge swath of available luxury features and advanced technology can turn it into a rolling penthouse. No matter which model you choose, the Ram 1500 advances the full-size pickup class and is a clear leader in several key areas. Learn more

What is a good price for a truck?

The average price for a pickup truck has gone up dramatically in recent years. Basic versions of full-size models such as a Chevrolet Silverado 1500 can still be purchased for about $35,000. However, a stronger engine or additional features can quickly push up the price. These days you should expect to pay $45,000 or more for a reasonably well-equipped, modern full-size truck and as much as $55,000 before options for top trims. Midsize trucks come with lower starting prices and fewer options, so there are good choices available for $30,000 or less. However, our two top-rated midsize choices, the Honda Ridgeline and Jeep Gladiator, each start at $35,000 including destination. Learn more

What's the cheapest new truck to buy?

The full-size pickup truck with the lowest starting price is the 2020 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 at $29,895 with destination. The 2020 Ford F-150 is not far behind at $30,090. Each is a very basic vehicle with few amenities and no options, designed for work that usually requires a hardhat. But they will get you into the full-size truck class on a budget. The most affordable midsize model is the 2020 Chevrolet Colorado followed by its GMC Canyon cousin. The Chevrolet has a starting price of $22,395 including destination. Learn more

What used trucks to avoid?

Trucks, by definition, are built to last. We recommend finding a CPO, or certified pre-owned, model that is more likely to have been kept in good condition. A well-cared-for pickup truck will generally serve you well. However, the occasional vehicle has left us unimpressed over the years. Trucks that did not rate highly include the Nissan Titan built from 2004 to 2015, for its poor fuel economy and cheap-feeling interior, and the previous-generation Chevrolet Colorado, whose last model year was 2012. It offered below-average ride quality and refinement at the time. Learn more


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