Feds, Safety Advocates Fight Over Rearview Camera Recommendation | Edmunds.com
ADVERTISEMENT

Feds, Safety Advocates Fight Over Rearview Camera Recommendation


ADVERTISEMENT
Just the Facts:
  • The federal government said it will add rearview video systems to its list of recommended features in the New Car Assessment Program, but safety advocates see the move as a stalling tactic.
  • Safety advocates and two parents who unintentionally hit their children when backing up sued the U.S. Department of Transportation on Wednesday.
  • "It is time to stop delaying and start solving a dangerous safety problem with a technology that is available and absolutely essential to saving lives," Jackie Gillian, president of Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, said in a statement.

WASHINGTON — The federal government said it will add rearview video systems to its list of recommended features in the New Car Assessment Program, but safety advocates see the move as a stalling tactic.

Safety advocates and two parents who unintentionally hit their children when backing up sued the U.S. Department of Transportation on Wednesday, asking a court to order the agency to promptly issue a safety rule that was mandated by Congress in 2008 to set federal standards on vehicles' rear visibility.

Such systems enable drivers to see whether people or objects are in the blind spot behind vehicles. Safety advocates say that each year more than 200 individuals are killed and 18,000 injured in so-called "backover" crashes." Children under the age of 5 account for 44 percent of the fatalities.

The lawsuit asks the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit to direct the DOT to issue a mandatory rule within 90 days.

"It is time to stop delaying and start solving a dangerous safety problem with a technology that is available and absolutely essential to saving lives," said Jackie Gillian, president of Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, in a statement.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on Tuesday said it will begin to identify on www.safercar.gov vehicle models that have rearview video systems starting now. It said it was making the move while it "researches implementation of a rear visibility rule." Next, as soon as the agency is able to verify that systems meet basic criteria, the agency will recognize those vehicles as having this recommended advanced technology feature.

According to data compiled by Edmunds.com, 53 percent of 2013 model year vehicles offer rearview cameras as standard equipment on at least one trim level; 79 percent of 2013 vehicles offer the systems as standard or optional equipment on at least one trim level.

"As we've seen with other features in the past, adding rearview video systems to our list of recommended safety features will encourage both automakers and consumers to consider more vehicles that offer this important technology," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx in a statement. "While adding this technology to our list of safety features is important, I remain committed to implementing the rear visibility rule as well."

Implementation of the rule requiring cameras on cars has been delayed several times. The rule will not be implemented until January 2, 2015.

Edmunds says: Even though rearview camera systems are available on nearly eight in 10 new vehicles (as either standard or optional equipment), safety advocates want tougher government regulations implemented immediately.

Leave a Comment
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

New Car Reviews and Road Tests

ADVERTISEMENT

Get Pre-Approved for a Car Loan

up2drive

Get Pre-Approved for a Loan


Car.com

Credit Problems?
We can help you get Financing!

ADVERTISEMENT
Have a question? We're here to help!
Chat*
Chat online with us
Email
Email us at help@edmunds.com
*Available daily 8AM-5PM Pacific
Phone*
Call us at 855-782-4711
SMS*
Text us at ED411