2021 Toyota Tacoma

MSRP range: $27,230 - $47,030
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MSRP$35,892
Edmunds suggests you pay$34,057

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2021 Toyota Tacoma Review

  • Rugged off-pavement capability
  • Easily understood interior controls
  • Composite truck bed has movable tie-down cleats and a power outlet
  • Top-level V6 can be paired with a six-speed manual transmission
  • Off-road emphasis produces a tall step-up height
  • Trail and Nightshade special editions debut
  • Dual-zone automatic climate control standard on V6 models
  • TRD Sport and Off-Road trims get upgraded audio
  • Part of the third Tacoma generation introduced for 2016

Not everybody needs the size and capabilities of a full-size pickup. That's where midsize trucks come in, and the 2021 Toyota Tacoma is one of the better choices in the class. It trails behind the more city-friendly Honda Ridgeline and all-terrain Jeep Gladiator in our rankings, but we think the Tacoma is a sensible middle ground between the two. It also feels a little more refined than rivals from Chevrolet, Ford and GMC.

After last year's significant refresh, there are no changes to the core Tacoma offerings. There are, however, a pair of new limited-edition trims for buyers looking for something a little different. The Trail Special Edition is based on the near entry-level SR5 trim with the double-cab body style. Limited to 7,000 units, it comes with all-terrain tires and lockable bed storage bins. The driver's side bin is even insulated so it can function as a built-in cooler. There's also a Nightshade Special Edition based on the more expensive Limited trim, but changes are only aesthetic, with blacked-out badging and trim throughout. Just 5,000 are planned for production.

Is the Tacoma the right midsize truck for you? Check out our Expert Rating to get our in-depth take on the 2021Tacoma.

What's it like to live with?

When the Tacoma was redesigned in 2016, we wanted to know what it was like to live with, so we bought one. Specifically, we purchased the 2016 Toyota Tacoma TRD Off-Road and lived with it in our long-term fleet for nearly two years, putting over 40,000 miles on the odometer. The Tacoma has received some updates since its redesign in 2016, but it's the same generation truck so most of our observations apply. To learn about everything from seat comfort to reliability, check out all the details in our long-term Tacoma test.

EdmundsEdmunds' Expert Rating
Rated for you by America’s best test team
The Toyota Tacoma is the best-selling truck in its segment for a reason. Foremost, it enjoys a long-standing reputation for durability and go-anywhere capability. But it's also smooth, efficient and easy to get along with on the road.
The Tacoma steers and handles smoothly and is generally easy to drive. The main exception is the brakes, which feel grabby and can induce nosedive in hard stops. We do wish the 3.5-liter V6 felt a bit more willing, but there is enough power for daily use. The transmission shifts predictably and is able to get the most out of the engine.

Off-road is where the Tacoma truly shines and stands above all others except the Gladiator. The Tacoma has the clearance, gearing and traction to tackle serious terrain, and the brakes and throttle prove brilliantly precise and controllable in low-range crawling situations.
The Tacoma was never a disagreeable truck to ride in, but changes introduced in 2020 made it a little bit more pleasant. A fully adjustable 10-way driver's seat comes standard in V6 trucks, and this seat promotes long-range comfort for drivers of almost all shapes and sizes.

The thicker side-window glass cuts down the wind noise compared to prior years, though the Colorado and the Ridgeline still have an edge here. The same is true for ride quality since the Tacoma is still truckier than its smoothest-riding competitors. As for the climate system, it has effective heating and cooling and is easy to adjust.
The Tacoma's main drawback is its tallish step-in height. Get past that and everything else is solid once you're inside. The controls are logical and straightforward, including the large infotainment screen and the recently redesigned knobs and physical shortcut buttons.

The 10-way power seat provides a greater range of adjustability than in pre-2020 models, but we wish the telescoping steering wheel pulled out more. The front-seat roominess benefits from the seat's added downward adjustability, but other dimensions remain the same as before. Visibility is very good thanks to the profile of the hood, ample side windows, and a forward- and side-looking camera system.
The latest Tacoma is pretty well stocked with tech features. Toyota introduced a new screen in 2020 that featured a larger size, crisper map graphics and quicker responses than in previous models. You also get Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and even Amazon Alexa. Built-in navigation is an inexpensive upgrade option, and it's probably worth getting if you're planning on venturing out of cellphone range a lot.

Toyota's approach to standard active safety tech is admirable. Adaptive cruise control, automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, lane departure warning, automatic high-beam control, and even a driver drowsiness warning system are all standard on all grades.
The Tacoma's truck bed is ideal. It's made of a composite material that needs no bedliner, and it has an enviable combination of fixed and movable tie-downs. Loading is easy because the tailgate opens low and its bedsides aren't comically tall. With a 6,800-pound maximum tow rating, the Tacoma does lag behind some others, but the deficit isn't large.

Interior storage for small items is adequate. Folding the rear seats down into their cargo-carrying position is a little fussy, but as a result it offers better storage space than all but the Ridgeline and the Gladiator. Installing child safety seats is easy, but larger rear-facing and infant seats might eat into front passenger room.
The 3.5-liter V6 engine and six-speed automatic combo earns 20 mpg combined (18 city/22 highway) in 4WD trim and 21 mpg combined in rear-wheel-drive models. Our testing leads us to believe that these ratings are achievable and accurate.

We tested a 2016 TRD 4WD Off-Road for more than a year and averaged 18.6 mpg over 40,000 miles of use. We were able to exceed the highway rating on several road trips, and there are good reasons why our truck may have come up just over 1 mpg short. Our home-base location skews the mix toward city driving, and the TRD Off-Road has knobbier tires and lacks the front airdam that comes on most Tacomas.
You get a lot of well-built truck and a bed with many standard cargo-handling and safety features for your money. The value equation is particularly good on the TRD models. Build quality is solid, and Toyota trucks are known for their mechanical durability. Although warranty coverage isn't generous, you do get two years of free scheduled maintenance.
Toyota's Tacoma manages to deliver fun in a right-size pickup package. Its TRD off-road packages are the real deal, not sticker packages inflated by marketing hype. The buying public has responded with fierce loyalty, and this truck has also attracted the attention of the aftermarket, which supports it with many products that enable all sorts of customization. The Tacoma is great for those who want the look and feel of an off-roader even if they'll never get it dirty because it's also an easy-driving and dependable pickup truck.

Which Tacoma does Edmunds recommend?

The midtier TRD Sport and Off-Road are quite appealing. They both add plenty of features and offer a diverse options list. Of the two, the TRD Off-Road is our pick. It enhances the truck's off-road ability while keeping the cost reasonable. While the deletion of the airdam comes with a slight fuel economy penalty, we think it's offset by the more comfortable ride provided by the smaller wheels and Bilstein shocks.

Toyota Tacoma models

The Toyota Tacoma is a midsize pickup truck offered in six trim levels: SR, SR5, TRD Sport, TRD Off-Road, Limited and TRD Pro.The SR and SR5 come standard with a 2.7-liter four-cylinder engine producing 159 horsepower and 180 lb-ft of torque. Optional for those trims — and standard on all others — is a 3.5-liter V6 with 278 hp and 265 lb-ft on tap. A six-speed automatic is common across the lineup, though some trims offer a six-speed manual transmission in conjunction with the V6.

Other choices include an extended cab (Access Cab) configuration with a 6.1-foot bed or a crew cab (Double Cab) with a 5- or 6.1-foot bed. Rear-wheel drive is standard on most trims, with part-time four-wheel drive (with a low-range transfer case) an option.

SR
The SR is the work truck of the bunch and kicks things off with:

  • 16-inch steel wheels
  • Sliding rear window
  • Power-adjustable and heated side mirrors
  • Tough composite bed that needs no bedliner
  • Movable bed cleats
  • Locking/unlocking vehicle remote (V6 only; can be added to four-cylinder models via Convenience package)
  • Dual-zone automatic climate control (V6 only)
  • 7-inch touchscreen
  • Six-speaker audio system
  • Apple CarPlay and Android Auto
  • Satellite radio
  • Three USB ports
  • Wi-Fi hotspot

The base Tacoma also comes with a suite of driving aids. These include:

  • Forward collision mitigation (warns you of an impending collision and applies the brakes in certain scenarios)
  • Lane departure warning (alerts you if the vehicle begins to drift out of its lane)
  • Adaptive cruise control (maintains a driver-set distance between the Toyota and the car in front)

SR5
The SR5 will be a little more palatable for most non-commercial buyers. Among its upgrades are:

  • Alloy wheels (V6 only)
  • Chrome exterior trim
  • Locking/unlocking vehicle remote
  • Power-sliding rear window (V6 Double Cab only)
  • Power-adjustable driver's seat (V6 only)
  • Auto-dimming mirror (V6 only)
  • Leather-wrapped steering wheel
  • 8-inch touchscreen

The Tacoma SR5 is available with a number of option packages, including:

  • Dynamic Navigation package (V6 only)
    • Navigation system
    • Rear parking sensors (alert you to obstacles that may not be visible behind the vehicle when parking)
  • Technology package (V6 only)
    • Blind-spot monitor with rear cross-traffic alert (warns you if a vehicle is in your blind spot during a lane change or while reversing)
  • Trail Special Edition (V6 Double Cab only)
    • All-terrain tires
    • Unique seat trim
    • All-weather floor mats
    • 120-volt outlet in bed
    • Locking storage bins in bed

TRD Sport
The TRD Sport is the mildest of the off-road Tacomas. Because it's powered by the V6, all non-optional features listed above designated "V6 only" are standard here. On top of the SR5 features, it adds:

  • 17-inch wheels
  • Sport-tuned suspension
  • Hood scoop
  • Heated mirrors
  • Body-colored fender flares and rear bumper
  • 120-volt outlet in bed
  • Keyless entry and ignition (automatic transmission only)
  • Power-sliding rear window (Double Cab only)
  • Wireless charging pad

A number of packages and stand-alone options are available for the TRD Sport, and many can be mixed and matched with one another. In a nutshell, these include:

  • Technology package
    • Blind-spot monitor with rear cross-traffic alert
    • Rear parking sensors
  • Premium Audio and Dynamic Navigation package
    • Navigation system
    • JBL premium audio system
  • Premium Sport package
    • Sunroof
    • Heated front seats
    • Leather upholstery
  • Advanced Technology package
    • 360-degree camera system (gives you a top-down view of the Tacoma and its surroundings for tight parking situations)
  • LED headlights

TRD Off-Road
The TRD Off-Road is equipped similarly to the TRD Sport but adds genuine off-road performance bits. Upgrades include:

  • 16-inch wheels
  • Removes the Sport's hood scoop
  • Chrome rear bumper
  • Textured black fender flares
  • Removes front airdam
  • Lockable rear differential
  • Bilstein shock absorbers
  • Advanced off-road traction control system with multiple terrain settings and rock crawl (4WD only)

The TRD Off-Road's option packages are generally the same as those for the TRD Sport. The available Multi-Terrain monitor adds front- and side-view cameras for fine-tuning the Tacoma's position off-road.

Limited
The Tacoma Limited primarily adds luxury features. It includes most of the TRD Sport's equipment, minus the sport suspension and hood scoop. Also added are:

  • 18-inch alloy wheels
  • LED headlights
  • Silver grille
  • Sunroof
  • Leather upholstery
  • JBL audio system
  • Navigation system
  • Blind-spot monitor with rear cross-traffic alert
  • Rear parking sensors
  • 360-degree camera system

The only notable package here is the Nightshade Special Edition package. It adds:

  • Black-painted wheels
  • Black exterior styling elements, including mirror caps and door handles

TRD Pro
The TRD Pro is the range-topping Tacoma and gains serious off-road hardware. On top of TRD Off-Road equipment, the TRD Pro adds:

  • 16-inch black-painted TRD wheels with all-terrain tires
  • LED headlights
  • Black grille
  • Hood scoop
  • Thicker front skid plate
  • Fox internal bypass shock absorbers
  • Upgraded exhaust
  • Multi-Terrain Monitor (an off-road camera system)
  • Sunroof
  • Unique leather upholstery
  • JBL audio system
  • Navigation system
  • Blind-spot monitor with rear cross-traffic alert
  • Rear parking sensors
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Consumer reviews

Read what other owners think about the 2021 Toyota Tacoma.

Average user rating: 4.0 stars
32 total reviews
5 star reviews: 53%
4 star reviews: 19%
3 star reviews: 13%
2 star reviews: 9%
1 star reviews: 6%

Trending topics in reviews

  • interior
  • handling & steering
  • comfort
  • engine
  • transmission
  • reliability & manufacturing quality
  • road noise
  • value
  • lights
  • sound system
  • appearance
  • driving experience
  • acceleration
  • warranty
  • off-roading
  • brakes

Most helpful consumer reviews

5/5 stars, Great truck, much improved
Sam,
TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A)
This 2021 Tacoma is a wonderful truck. I had a 2018 Tacoma but was unsatisfied with the cabin noise and transmission issues of shifting all the time. This 2021 TRD sport is very quiet, audio is improved, ride is very smooth and transmission issues of shifting all the time have disappeared. Couldn't be happier with this decision. Ordered it in August and was delivered in October. Haven't found anything I dislike about this truck.
4/5 stars, 1st Truck Ever
David D,
SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A)
I have had a car my whole driving career, but getting older, and being more of an outdoor person, I wanted something higher up, off road type and not family SUV like. Compared the Ford Ranger and Tacoma, and obviously went with Tacoma. The Truck rides excellent, comfortable, enough power, tech is good, bed is just enough, does need more storage I think in the cab. The complaints about the transmission is true, it is uncoordinated but manageable. I don’t expect engine or transmission problems with Toyota’s mechanical reliability. And there has been no complaints of transmission replacement of the 2020s. I don’t like the use of a key, as I’m use to push button start, seems so 90s. Higher up trims give you a push start but even the FOB looks early 2000s. Just put 1000 miles on it and still breaking it in. I feel that this truck will last a while but understand why Toyota doesn’t put all the fancy features in it right away, to reduce problems before they really had time to test them and make sure they are good so they provide a reliable vehicle.
5/5 stars, My first Taco, and her name is Maggie
Connor McCollum,
SR5 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A)
I just leased a brand new 2021 Toyota Tacoma SR5 Double Cab on my birthday and couldn't be happier! I was casually looking for used ones but sales talked me into leasing a new one to keep my payment down and not paying for depreciation (which doesn't really exist on this vehicle by the way) This truck was literally fresh off the transporter with 4 miles on it! I even saw it get unloaded from the transporter thinking there's no way that would ever be mine. It wasn't my first color choice however considering I wanted what everyone else wants, either Cement Grey, Quicksand Brown, or Cavalry Blue. Of course those colors are red-hot which makes them virtually nonexistent and dealers aren't that willing to trade. So I had to make do with what they had but I have to say this shade of Magnetic Grey (hence the truck's nickname) is growing on me. I despised it over the years but once I saw it up close in person I really enjoy the metallic sparkle when the sun hits it just right. I'm so happy to not only have the practicality of a pickup truck but also having the convenience features I've been craving. I've always wanted a vehicle with a big touchscreen infotainment system and thankfully for 2020 onward, they added that as standard. Same goes for the power driver's seat. You can find the perfect seating position this way. Even the little features get me giddy such as a sunglasses holder, the LED dome light package, the behind-the-seats storage, a power sliding rear window, LED bedlights, and automatic climate control. The only feature that it's missing is push-button start, which should be standard considering all the money they charge for these trucks! Fuel economy is pretty decent. With a full tank of gas my range was 375 miles! It's been almost two weeks since the fill-up and I'm still at more than half a tank! And that's in-town driving! That's why I don't get these complaints about fuel economy. I did notice the transmission is a bit sluggish which is a complaint that I can actually agree with. The truck has a hard time finding gears especially from second to third. It also seems to clunk when downshifting or reeving at high RPMs. This shouldn't be the case considering it's only a six-speed. They've been using this transmission for years and it's just now suffering problems. But I'm just happy it's not turbocharged or a CVT which are prone to failure. Overall, I made a wise decision. You can't go wrong with a pickup truck. I can always find time to utilize it. And it's a midsize so parking and maneuverability is pretty decent. Also, this has the highest residual value of any vehicle in the market going for it. Not to mention it looks good. This is the best looking midsize on the market which is one of the reasons so many people go for it. And it's reliable. All I have to do is routine maintenance and I'm good to go!
3/5 stars, Toyota Tacoma infotainment screen and the springs
RICHARD PERASSO OWNER 2020 G/C,
SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A)
I bought a Tacoma club cab pickup the biggest complaint is about the brightness and lack of clarity of the back up camera on the infotainment screen , The images are very poor quality. The vehicle is built very strong and it will last for years trouble free if you can stand the stiff suspension.

2021 Toyota Tacoma video

CARLOS LAGO: Hey. Carlos Lago with Edmunds, here. That's a Ford Ranger Tremor. It's what Ford calls the most off road ready Ranger you can get from your local Ford dealer. Now what better way to measure that off-road capability than comparing it to a Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro? And that's the off road ready Tacoma you can get from your local Toyota dealer. These are both capable, comfortable, daily drivable, and most importantly cool looking road pickup trucks. Now we've already tested and evaluated the standard version of these trucks both on and off road. So in this video, we're going to talk about what makes these off-road specific trim levels special, the pros and cons of each, and which one ultimately might be worth your hard earned money. Before we do, make sure to click Like and Subscribe. If you like videos like this one, also visit edmunds.com/sellmycar to get an instant cash offer on your car. What makes the Tremor the Tremor? Well, aside from sharing the name with an excellent movie franchise that you should watch, the first one's got Kevin Bacon in it. Second one's good too, but-- stop there. Aside from all that, it's an off-road package that costs about $4,300 and you can get it on the mid-level XLT or top line Lariat Rangers provided it's a four door like this and with the five foot bed, obviously 4 by 4 too. It comes with Fox shocks all around, remote reservoirs in the rear, you get a small lift, a locking rear diff and a couple other things we'll talk about later like these 17 inch wheels and all-terrain tires. This specific one is a Lariat. You can tell because the badge right here. And it's got a couple of goodies on it too like the tech package, upgraded stereo, trailer tow package, a few other things that bring the as tested price to about $47,000. Now the super familiar and endlessly popular Tacoma, the TRD Pro is different than the Tremor in that it's its own trim level. So there's less flexibility with pricing. In order to get it like this automatic one, you have to start at $48,000. Now this truck also has a bunch of non important accessories, and doodads, installed on it that bring the as tested price to just above $50,000. As for the TRD Pro, it's a rung above the TRD Off Road. So you get all the hardware that truck comes with like a locking rear diff and a couple other things. And the TRD Pro Package, or the trim level, adds Fox shocks all around, remote reservoirs in the rear, a small lift, and a bunch of other cosmetic upgrades, which in my mind aren't that important anymore because you can no longer get the TRD Pro in army green. That's sad. But you can get that on the TRD Off Road. And it costs less money. Really think about that. [MUSIC PLAYING] When it comes to demonstrating articulation and clearances, we like to use the ziggurat of integrity. But we couldn't get to it because of snow. So here's a rock. And we parked on it. Couple of things to point out with the tremor. Yes, that lift gives you more clearance throughout, both in ground clearance, approach break over, and departure angle versus the standard Ranger. If you check the gap on this rock here, we might not have actually made this happen with a normal Ranger. Now other things that are specific to Tremor are these recovery hooks which are nice. Little red accents here always a nice touch. And also if you look underneath, you'll see what appears to be a plastic body cladding right here because it doesn't have TRD embossed on it. But it's actually steel. And I didn't find out until I hit it and hurt my hand. So it's really nice that you have steel protection under the truck. On the other hand, both of these trucks have plastic bumpers or bumpers with lots of plastic on it and parking sensors on them. So if you do end up ignoring the warning signs of your steel protection, you'll probably end up facing a hefty bill if you touch those with rocks. That's about there. Yeah. And I'm going to write R for Ranger. If we are anything, we are good scientists, engineers. Huzzah. Anyway, so as we get to the back wheel, what actually limited us from climbing up this rock further was the front end. We lost traction there. And that's actually a good stopping point because it shows us how much articulation we have out of this rear wheel. I'll use Edmund's standard measuring device, Arnie here, to see that's about 1 and 1/3 Arnies off the ground. We'll be sure to measure that again with the Tacoma later. Now that the wheel's all unloaded and stuff, we can also see what's happening back here. You get to see those remote reservoirs from Fox, really cool to show off that branding. But more importantly, you can actually see the full sized spare in those meaty tread blocks. That's a nice thing to have. As we get to the rear, you don't see a lot in the way of recovery hooks like you do in the front. And this bumper is still plastic as well. So same challenge as the front. But if you do need to get a recovery thing going on, you can use a trailer hitch and get something like this guy, which is definitely not heavy. I'm just weak. It's like a maraca. [MUSIC PLAYING] As you can see from the positioning on the tape, the Tacoma got further up the rock. Now in this position, you can see its advantages with regard to clearance. Approach angle versus the Tremor is like 4 degrees more, break over is very similar, departure angle is actually slightly worse. But we can take a look at that when we move around to the back. Now up front here, the gaps here are a lot bigger than they were in the Ranger. And that means you're going to be less likely to bump into stuff. And that's good because these bumpers are still plastic. Now underneath is the skid plate. And you could definitely tell us it's a skid plate because it says TRD on it in big red letters. This is also aluminum and not steel like the Rangers. So it's lighter but more susceptible to damage. Ideally or theoretically it would be more expensive to replace two just based on the price of aluminum versus steel. Let's take a look at the side. At the back we see we definitely picked up a rear wheel. But the question is, how high? It's about one Arnie off the ground. So in terms of articulation, this is better than the range of Tremor by one third of an Arnie. Important stuff. Now, if you're wondering where the Fox racing reservoir is at, it's actually at the bottom, because that's where it's mounted. But the interesting thing to note about these shocks is they're mounted outside of the leaf springs closer to the wheel. On the Ranger, they're inside of the leaf springs. Also full size spare wheel and tire. So cool stuff. As we get to the rear, it's the same story with recovery where you can use an accessory and the trailer hitch to solve those problems. Also like the Ranger, its plastic bumper with parking sensors. So be careful if you touch things. Also you probably saw this guy and the side steps on the Ranger. If you care about off-road driving and clearances, don't get these accessories. Because these things are a easy way to introduce parts to vehicle to the ground. So clearances and articulation generally go to the Tacoma. But it's the other story when it comes to powertrain. We love the turbo 2.3 liter 4 banger under the hood of this Ranger. It's pretty powerful, but also has significantly more torque than the Tacoma. Not only that, it's connected to a 10 speed automatic. Having all those gears gives this power train more opportunity to flex its muscle. So many gears. So many options. And that improves acceleration and fuel economy, at least in terms of EPA estimates. The Ranger also has a shorter first gear. That means it overall has a better crawl ratio than the Tacoma. And that's further amplified by all that torque. Basically, this engine doesn't have to work as hard at low speeds. Not only that. It's a turbo engine. So it's not going to be as affected at altitude as a naturally aspirated engine. And if you want more power, you can get it as an accessory at your local Ford dealer. There's a lot to like here. Now the old familiar Toyota 3 and 1/2 liter V6. This engine is old, but it's far from underpowered. It still makes decent power and torque, although it certainly has less torque than that Ranger. Now if you read all the comments below, you're probably going to hear something about Toyota reliability. That's all well and good. The real challenge with this powertrain is the six speed automatic. With fewer gears, you don't have as wide of a ratio spread. So predictably, this truck is slower in a straight line and not as fuel efficient in terms of EPA estimates. It does have numerically lower crawl ratio than the Ranger. So that means this engine's going to have to work a bit harder to move over objects at low speeds. You can get it with a six speed manual. So that's cool if you're into that kind of thing. On the other hand, you do have to live with the TRD exhaust that comes standard on the TRD Pro. And that thing just doesn't sound that good. It's further amplified by the fact that you only have six gears. So when you're on the freeway and you go to pass somebody, and you make this big downshift, and that exhaust sounds terrible. And it's just not a pleasant thing to drive on the freeway. All that said, this is still a package that gets the job done. Now we're going to do a little hill climb. Ahead of me is obviously a hill. Now we know both of these trucks can make it up this hill. We've already done it already. We're also going to climb up this hill in more challenging ways than necessary just to demonstrate all the tools and features at our disposal in each truck. So I'm going to start in four high with the rear diff open. And I'll engage features as we start driving up in both trucks. Now at the Ford, I have a couple of things at my disposal. I, of course, have four high, I've got a locking rear diff, I also have a terrain management system that I will use to select, let's see, I got normal, grass, gravel, snow, mud ruts, and sand. Let's try mud ruts. And that'll work in four high. So I'm also going to choose a line that's not going to be the most efficient. Let's see what we need to make it up this hill. A lot of ruts in front of me. So perfect application to make it up. No problem. I don't have to use a lot of gas pedal. The power from that four cylinder is pretty strong. And I've got to say, there's is actually quite a bit of grip in these tires as well. You can look at the side walls just to see, or the tread blocks, to see just how beefy they are. Still haven't needed to engage the locking diff yet. But that'll probably change right about there. So let's stop, lock the diff, and resume. And no problems whatsoever. The computer software is going to be helping me out but I can't really sense it. If I'm honest, I don't hear any ABS pulsing to grab the front tires or anything. It's actually pretty smooth in application, although I would like to have a forward facing camera on this truck as I crest the hill. That would make it a lot easier. While we're doing this, we may as well talk about general interior impressions as well. This is a pretty spacious interior. And have a lot of headroom. I definitely like the seating position in this truck more than I do in the Tacoma. I feel like I'm sitting at a more natural angle. And again, that headroom really helps as well. One thing I'll point out while we're driving is that I have six auxiliary switches on top of the dash for accessories if you want to install. And that's really nice. It comes as part of the Tremor package. So if you want to add things like a light, or a winch, or lights, or a winch, you can. That's really cool. Just know that the front bumper I don't believe actually has a winch provision. So you have to do some additional work there to make that happen. But nice that Ford is looking out for you from that perspective. So I'm turning around at the top of the hill now to come back down. And again, it's one of those situations where a front camera would be really appreciated. And on the way down I'm going to use the off road cruise control, sort of low speed cruise control that the Ranger comes with. I'm going to go down here and hit this button, which is going to engage trail control. That's what they call it. And then I use their cruise control to engage it. And I can start at one mile an hour and then increase the speed in half mile an hour increments. And that should get me down the hill without trouble. Let's see how that works. You can hear the ABS I presume making that little grinding noise. Very subtle though. And very smooth in its application. Wow, this is going really slow for four high. Let me bump up the speed a little bit. 3 mile an hour. And this is doing a pretty good job I got to say. My foot's off the brake, just letting the system ride it out. While we're doing this, visibility is strong. I don't have a big hood bulge blocking my view. But I would like a little more interior storage I guess. Let's bump it up to 5 miles an hour. That is really cool. That's really neat. Now as we get to the next drop in elevation, I'm going to turn off trail control. And we're going to engage low range and see what the crawling is like on the way down the hill. See if I feel like I need to ride the brakes going down this steep hill. Let's put it in first gear. What's funny is you can tell that the shifter, this dash was definitely not designed for 10 speeds because you only have room for six gears. And then once you get up to 10, it has an arrow that indicates. But will go down to first gear. That's just an interesting thing to point out the age of this truck, or the age of that dash. So in first gear, in low range diff locked, foot's hovering the brake pedal but don't need to use it yet. OK, needed to use it there a little bit. But I've got to say, not on it as much as I thought I might need to be. Off the break. Crawling pretty good. Get up to about 4 miles an hour. A lot of control downhill. Nothing to be worried about on this hill. Again, this is not a super challenging hill. But just to show you the technology and attributes you have in this truck when you're climbing. Very quiet and smooth experience overall. Not a lot to complain about with how this thing goes up the hill. There's certainly a lot of capability in this drive train and in this truck overall from what we can see. Now we're going to climb the same hill in the Tacoma. And I'm to do it the exact same way, starting out in four high with the rear diff not locked. The Tacoma has a couple off road drive modes. But what's different about them versus the Ranger is that you have to be in four low to use them. So we'll do that on the way back down I guess. Let's start climbing. I can't turn out and say that the seating position in the Tacoma feels weird. My feet are higher than what I'm used to in most vehicles. What we understand is of course that your feet are like that because the body's higher. And that's what gives you that additional front clearance. But it does feel weird to some body styles. And that could be, I don't know, fatiguing on a long drive. This TRD Pro also doesn't have the same level of grip in the tire. You can tell it by looking at the tread blocks. They're not as meaty as the Rangers. But still, we're making totally fine progress up this hill. In fact, the throttle control on this is really good. I haven't even needed to engage the rear diff yet. And what I don't like as I crest this hill that the hood bulge is massive. And I actually can't see over it as I'm coming up over the hill. But fortunately, there's a trail camera that lets me see the forward facing view from the bumper. So I can just kind of ignore that hood bulge. What's a bummer about this forward facing view is that the resolution isn't that great. So it's better than nothing, but it could be even better. I've got to say, I'm really impressed that considering the deficit in power, the deficit in tire, I climbed up this hill without needing to lock the rear diff. That's pretty cool. That's pretty cool. Let's turn around at the top here. Thanks for that camera, I can actually see where the fence is. As we go on the way down, the only way to use the drive modes in the Tacoma is to switch to four low. So that's what I'll do now. Wait for that to engage. And then there are two things we can use. There is a low speed crawl control just like the Ranger. And there are a couple of different drive modes. But there are differences in the way that they work. OK, four low's engaged, back into drive. So I'll start out with the multi terrain select. I've got a couple of options. Mud and sand, loose rock, mogul, rock and dirt, and rock. So I think rock would be a good option for climbing up a hill. We didn't even need to engage it on the way up because this had the traction and capabilities to get up, which was honestly surprising considering the difference between these two. I'm going to put it down in first gear and let the truck control itself first. It is going to be going faster downhill because we have as much engine braking as we do in the Ranger. But not bad at all. Yeah. Really easy to manage. No issues in this thing. And as I get to this crest here, I'm going to turn off the multi terrain select and turn on crawl control. Now crawl control is the low speed cruise control. Instead of adjusting it by half mile an hour increments, you basically have five different speeds, low, medium, and high, and two settings in between low and-- one setting between low and medium, one setting between medium and high. You get what I mean. And it's going to do the same job where it's going to be automatically adjusting your speed with the brakes. You can probably already hear how much louder it is than the Rangers. That's not to say it feels clunkier in action. It just certainly sounds clunkier. And it gets the same job done. We can turn up a little bit. So if you can live with something that sounds like the Jason soundtrack, de, de, de, de, de, de. De, de, de, de, de, de. De, de, de, de. Or one of those throbbing bass lines from 80s synth retro wave music, this works. This works. And it's pretty cool, too. I will say, as I'm coming down the hill, the glare on this screen blows out the forward facing camera. So that could be a problem, especially when you want to use that camera. Turn the speed up. Let it climb this hill, which is totally unneeded. But it's nice to know you have that safety net. Neither of these trucks have front locking differentials. We haven't found a place where we would benefit from those yet. But that's a important thing to point out as we talk about these trucks. That's all the cruise control. That's pretty cool. That's a pretty cool system. Crawl control has been deactivated. All right. We've reached the-- 3, 2, 1. All right. We've reached the end. And the question is, which one of these trucks is worth your hard earned cash? And the answer isn't as simple as we would all hope it is. Because it really depends on your priorities. So let's run through the pros and cons of each truck, starting with the Tacoma. The pros, off-road capability in terms of clearances and articulation are impossible to ignore. This thing has it all when it comes to those measurements and those capabilities. We also noticed that it was able to do basically everything the Ranger could do, if not more, even though it's deficient both in torque and gearing. So that's impressive too. The interior also boasts more storage overall. You also get a forward facing camera system. And a lot of that stuff makes it for a really usable truck off road. On road is where a lot of the flaws creep in, specifically the powertrain. That six speed automatic was fine five years ago. But today, it really comes up short, especially when you're commuting on the freeway. It's maddening listening to that exhaust. I don't like it. Also, cost. You have to spend a lot to get a TRD Pro. And you kind of wonder where all that money is going to outside of the light up Pro on the headlights, which look cool. But I'd rather have an eight speed or a 10 speed transmission. Let's be honest. Ford Ranger pros are kind of the opposite. Powertrain is robust and powerful and really easy to live with. It's great off road and great on road. Price. You can get all the best parts of the off road performance in the Ranger for significantly less money than the Tacoma TRD Pro. That's really impressive too. Three, something we haven't really talked about in this video but bears pointing out is towing and hauling. The Ranger Tremor can tow and haul slightly more than the Tacoma TRD Pro. So if that's important to you, that's worth caring about as well. And I almost forgot, the electronic drive off road modes in the Ranger are smoother in application, although they don't seem to be any more or less functional than the Tacoma. It just feels nicer to use. And how can I forget the upfitter switches in the Ranger? That's a really nice addition for people who want to install their own accessories and want easy power to access them and turn them off and on without having to install an aftermarket box somewhere. All really nice stuff. Now on the down sides, with the Ranger, the interior storage options aren't as nice as the Tacoma. Also, the fact that the rear seat only folds as one whole unit, not 60-40 split, is a big bummer when it comes to wanting to haul three people in cargo. We really wish that was a better setup. Overall though, the Ranger Tremor seems to be an easier truck to live with day to day if you're going to spend a lot of your time commuting and go off road sometimes. Whereas the Tacoma might be slightly better or if you prioritize off-road performance over everything else. I still think get a TRD off-road with army green and let the aftermarket do the rest. But, hey. That's my money. So thanks for watching. If you like this video and want to see more of it, leave a like, and a comment, and subscribe. And if you don't like it, hey I'm sure you're going to comment anyway. Also, be sure to visit edmunds.com for more about these trucks and others like them. And also visit edmunds.com/sellmycar to get an instant cash offer on your car.

Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro vs Ford Ranger Tremor | Off-Road Truck Comparison

Features & Specs

Base MSRP
$32,480
MPG & Fuel
19 City / 24 Hwy / 21 Combined
Fuel Tank Capacity: 21.1 gal. capacity
Seating
5 seats
Drivetrain
Type: rear wheel drive
Transmission: 6-speed automatic
Engine
V6 cylinder
Horsepower: 278 hp @ 6000 rpm
Torque: 265 lb-ft @ 4600 rpm
Basic Warranty
3 yr./ 36000 mi.
Dimensions
Length: 212.3 in. / Height: 70.6 in. / Width: 75.2 in.
Curb Weight: 4205 lbs.
Cargo Capacity, All Seats In Place: N/A
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At a Glance:
  • 9 Colors
  • 4 Trims

Safety

Our experts’ favorite Tacoma safety features:

Blind-Spot Monitor
Issues a visual or audio warning if the driver initiates a lane change when another vehicle is there or approaching rapidly.
Rear Cross-Traffic Alert
Alerts the driver if traffic is approaching from the side when the car is backing out of a perpendicular or angled parking space.
Pre-Collision System with Pedestrian Detection
Warns of potential collisions with pedestrians or vehicles and automatically applies the brakes if the driver does not react in time.

NHTSA Overall Rating 4 out of 5 stars

The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration offers independent analysis.

Frontal Barrier Crash RatingRating
Overall4 / 5
Driver4 / 5
Passenger4 / 5
Side Crash RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Side Barrier RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Driver5 / 5
Passenger5 / 5
Combined Side Barrier & Pole RatingsRating
Front Seat5 / 5
Back Seat5 / 5
RolloverRating
Rollover4 / 5
Dynamic Test ResultNo Tip
Risk Of Rollover14.7%

IIHS Rating

The Insurance Institute of Highway Safety uses extensive crash tests to determine car safety.

Side Impact Test
Good
Roof Strength Test
Good
Rear Crash Protection / Head Restraint
Good
IIHS Small Overlap Front TestNot Tested
Moderate Overlap Front Test
Good


FAQ

Is the Toyota Tacoma a good car?

The Edmunds experts tested the 2021 Tacoma both on the road and at the track, giving it a 7.7 out of 10. You probably care about Toyota Tacoma fuel economy, so it's important to know that the Tacoma gets an EPA-estimated 18 mpg to 21 mpg, depending on the configuration. And then there's safety and reliability. Edmunds has all the latest NHTSA and IIHS crash-test scores, plus industry-leading expert and consumer reviews to help you understand what it's like to own and maintain a Toyota Tacoma. Learn more

What's new in the 2021 Toyota Tacoma?

According to Edmunds’ car experts, here’s what’s new for the 2021 Toyota Tacoma:

  • Trail and Nightshade special editions debut
  • Dual-zone automatic climate control standard on V6 models
  • TRD Sport and Off-Road trims get upgraded audio
  • Part of the third Tacoma generation introduced for 2016
Learn more

Is the Toyota Tacoma reliable?

To determine whether the Toyota Tacoma is reliable, read Edmunds' authentic consumer reviews, which come from real owners and reveal what it's like to live with the Tacoma. Look for specific complaints that keep popping up in the reviews, and be sure to compare the Tacoma's average consumer rating to that of competing vehicles. Learn more

Is the 2021 Toyota Tacoma a good car?

There's a lot to consider if you're wondering whether the 2021 Toyota Tacoma is a good car. Edmunds' expert testing team reviewed the 2021 Tacoma and gave it a 7.7 out of 10. Safety scores, fuel economy, cargo capacity and feature availability should all be factors in determining whether the 2021 Tacoma is a good car for you. Learn more

How much should I pay for a 2021 Toyota Tacoma?

The least-expensive 2021 Toyota Tacoma is the 2021 Toyota Tacoma SR 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (2.7L 4cyl 6A). Including destination charge, it arrives with a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of about $27,230.

Other versions include:

  • TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $37,530
  • SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $32,480
  • TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $37,530
  • SR5 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $35,555
  • SR 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $32,665
  • TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $34,565
  • TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $38,140
  • SR 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (2.7L 4cyl 6A) which starts at $27,230
  • TRD PRO 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $47,030
  • TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $38,140
  • TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $35,700
  • Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $42,230
  • SR5 4dr Double Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $36,055
  • SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (2.7L 4cyl 6A) which starts at $29,080
  • TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $34,565
  • TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $35,700
  • TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $35,065
  • SR5 4dr Double Cab 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $32,980
  • Limited 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $39,155
  • TRD PRO 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6M) which starts at $44,325
  • Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $42,730
Learn more

What are the different models of Toyota Tacoma?

If you're interested in the Toyota Tacoma, the next question is, which Tacoma model is right for you? Tacoma variants include TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), and SR5 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A). For a full list of Tacoma models, check out Edmunds’ Features & Specs page. Learn more

More about the 2021 Toyota Tacoma

2021 Toyota Tacoma Overview

The 2021 Toyota Tacoma is offered in the following submodels: Tacoma Access Cab, Tacoma Double Cab. Available styles include TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (2.7L 4cyl 6A), SR 4dr Access Cab 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), TRD PRO 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6M), SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (2.7L 4cyl 6A), Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Double Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR 4dr Access Cab 6.1 ft. SB (2.7L 4cyl 6A), TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6M), SR5 4dr Access Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR 4dr Access Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Access Cab 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR 4dr Access Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (2.7L 4cyl 6A), TRD Off Road 4dr Access Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Double Cab 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), TRD Sport 4dr Access Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6M), TRD PRO 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6M), TRD Sport 4dr Access Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Access Cab 6.1 ft. SB (2.7L 4cyl 6A), SR5 4dr Access Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (2.7L 4cyl 6A), TRD Sport 4dr Access Cab 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), Limited 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A), and Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD 6.1 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A).

What do people think of the 2021 Toyota Tacoma?

Consumer ratings and reviews are also available for the 2021 Toyota Tacoma and all its trim types. Overall, Edmunds users rate the 2021 Tacoma 4.0 on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. Edmunds consumer reviews allow users to sift through aggregated consumer reviews to understand what other drivers are saying about any vehicle in our database. Detailed rating breakdowns (including performance, comfort, value, interior, exterior design, build quality, and reliability) are available as well to provide shoppers with a comprehensive understanding of why customers like the 2021 Tacoma.

Edmunds Expert Reviews

Edmunds experts have compiled a robust series of ratings and reviews for the 2021 Toyota Tacoma and all model years in our database. Our rich content includes expert reviews and recommendations for the 2021 Tacoma featuring deep dives into trim levels and features, performance, mpg, safety, interior, and driving. Edmunds also offers expert ratings, road test and performance data, long-term road tests, first-drive reviews, video reviews and more.

Our Review Process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.

What's a good price for a New 2021 Toyota Tacoma?

2021 Toyota Tacoma SR 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A)

The 2021 Toyota Tacoma SR 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $34,667. The average price paid for a new 2021 Toyota Tacoma SR 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is trending $1,236 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $1,236 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $33,431.

The average savings for the 2021 Toyota Tacoma SR 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is 3.6% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 16 2021 Toyota Tacoma SR 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Toyota Tacoma SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A)

The 2021 Toyota Tacoma SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $35,892. The average price paid for a new 2021 Toyota Tacoma SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is trending $1,835 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $1,835 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $34,057.

The average savings for the 2021 Toyota Tacoma SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is 5.1% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 24 2021 Toyota Tacoma SR5 4dr Double Cab 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A)

The 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $41,395. The average price paid for a new 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is trending $1,384 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $1,384 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $40,011.

The average savings for the 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is 3.3% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 48 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD Off Road 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A)

The 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $41,875. The average price paid for a new 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is trending $1,394 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $1,394 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $40,481.

The average savings for the 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is 3.3% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 46 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD Sport 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Toyota Tacoma Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A)

The 2021 Toyota Tacoma Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $44,851. The average price paid for a new 2021 Toyota Tacoma Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is trending $1,990 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $1,990 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $42,861.

The average savings for the 2021 Toyota Tacoma Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is 4.4% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 15 2021 Toyota Tacoma Limited 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD PRO 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A)

The 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD PRO 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $49,352. The average price paid for a new 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD PRO 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is trending $1,059 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $1,059 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $48,293.

The average savings for the 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD PRO 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) is 2.1% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 7 2021 Toyota Tacoma TRD PRO 4dr Double Cab 4WD 5.0 ft. SB (3.5L 6cyl 6A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

Which 2021 Toyota Tacomas are available in my area?

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2021 Toyota Tacoma for sale near. There are currently 192 new 2021 Tacomas listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $25,958 and mileage as low as 0 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a car from our massive database to find cheap vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the 2021 Toyota Tacoma. Then select Edmunds special offers, perks, deals, and incentives to contact the dealer of your choice and save up to $3,387 on a used or CPO 2021 Tacoma available from a dealership near you.

Can't find a new 2021 Toyota Tacomas you want in your area? Consider a broader search.

Find a new Toyota for sale - 10 great deals out of 19 listings starting at $24,658.

Why trust Edmunds?

Edmunds has deep data on over 6 million new, used, and certified pre-owned vehicles, including rich, trim-level features and specs information like: MSRP, average price paid, warranty information (basic, drivetrain, and maintenance), features (upholstery, bluetooth, navigation, heated seating, cooled seating, cruise control, parking assistance, keyless ignition, satellite radio, folding rears seats ,run flat tires, wheel type, tire size, wheel tire, sunroof, etc.), vehicle specifications (engine cylinder count, drivetrain, engine power, engine torque, engine displacement, transmission), fuel economy (city, highway, combined, fuel capacity, range), vehicle dimensions (length, width, seating capacity, cargo space), car safety, true cost to own. Edmunds also provides tools to allow shopper to compare vehicles to similar models of their choosing by warranty, interior features, exterior features, specifications, fuel economy, vehicle dimensions, consumer rating, edmunds rating, and color.

Should I lease or buy a 2021 Toyota Tacoma?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

Check out Toyota lease specials