Run-Flat Tires Disappoint, Study Finds


  • Run-Flat Tire Picture

    Run-Flat Tire Picture

    A new study finds consumers are not happy with run-flat tires. | April 02, 2013

Just the Facts:
  • Run-flat tires, which help cut vehicle weight to boost fuel efficiency, are proving to be a disappointment to consumers, a new J.D. Power and Associates report finds.
  • Consumers with run-flat tires are twice as likely to have to replace their tires as are those with standard tires, the report said.
  • Run-flat tires are not meeting "expectations," said the J.D. Power and Associates 2013 U.S. Original Equipment Tire Customer Satisfaction Study. effort.

WESTLAKE VILLAGE, California — Run-flat tires were designed to help eliminate tire-changing by the side of the road. They also cut vehicle weight by doing away with the spare tire, helping to boost fuel economy. But run-flats are proving to be a disappointment to consumers, a new J.D. Power and Associates report finds.

Consumers with run-flat tires are twice as likely to have to replace their tires as are those who have vehicles with standard tires, the report said. Run-flats typically are replaced sooner than conventional tires, too.

Study respondents also griped about low-rolling-resistance tires.

Run-flats allow automakers to skip the traditional spare tire in the trunk. The spare adds more weight to the car, which burns more gas.

Run-flat tires are not meeting "expectations," said the J.D. Power and Associates 2013 U.S. Original Equipment Tire Customer Satisfaction Study.

"Automakers are trying to reach the next level of fuel economy and are looking to their suppliers — in this case, tire manufacturers — to help them get there," said Brent Gruber, director, global automotive division at J.D. Power and Associates. "The challenge is doing this while finding tires that meet customers' expectations. Run-flat tires are not currently meeting those expectations."

Nearly one-third of customers whose vehicles are equipped with run-flat tires have had to replace at least one tire, compared with just 19 percent of those whose vehicles are equipped with standard tires, the report said.

In addition, customers with vehicles equipped with standard tires replace their tires after an average of 22,559 miles, more than 6,000 miles beyond the average life of run-flat tires.

Run-flat tires are used mainly for luxury and performance vehicles. The study is based on responses from more than 30,835 new-vehicle owners who purchased a 2011 or 2012 model-year vehicle.

Edmunds says: Run-flat tires may not be the innovation they're billed to be.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Marketplace

up2drive

Get Pre-Approved for a Loan


Car.com

Credit Problems?
We can help you get Financing!

ADVERTISEMENT