2014 Mazda 6 With Fuel-Saving i-Eloop Technology Priced


  • 2014 Mazda 6 Picture

    2014 Mazda 6 Picture

    The 2014 Mazda 6 with i-Eloop technology starts at $32,570. | July 08, 2013

Just the Facts:
  • The 2014 Mazda 6 midsize sedan with optional i-Eloop technology that helps to conserve fuel starts at $32,570.
  • The i-Eloop technology is available on the 2014 Mazda 6 Grand Touring model with the new GT Technology package.
  • The 2014 Mazda 6 with i-Eloop technology returns 28 mpg in city driving and 40 mpg on the highway.

IRVINE, California — The 2014 Mazda 6 midsize sedan with optional i-Eloop technology beats the fuel economy of smaller compacts such as the 2013 Honda Civic and subcompacts as the 2013 Ford Fiesta — but comes at a steep price: $32,570.

A base 2014 Mazda 6 starts at $21,785, including a $795 destination charge. The 2014 Mazda 6 with i-Eloop is on sale now.

The i-Eloop technology is available on the 2014 Mazda 6 Grand Touring model with the new GT Technology package. The Grand Touring model starts at $30,490, including shipping. The GT Technology package is priced at $2,080. The package also includes a lane departure warning system, high beam control, radar cruise control, forward obstruction warning system, a Sport mode button and active grille shutters.

I-Eloop is short for "intelligent energy loop." The automaker describes the setup as a capacitor-based regenerative engine braking system that converts a car's kinetic energy into electricity as the car decelerates. The system is unique because the energy it releases can power everything from headlights to the car's audio system.

The 2014 Mazda 6 with i-Eloop technology returns 28 mpg in city driving and 40 mpg on the highway, according to the EPA. The non i-Eloop-equipped Mazda 6 returns 26 mpg in city driving and 38 mpg on the highway when equipped with a six-speed automatic transmission.

In a more stunning comparison, a 2013 Honda Civic with a 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine and a five-speed automatic transmission returns 28 mpg in city driving and 39 mpg on the highway, according to the EPA. The Mazda 6 with i-Eloop even beats the subcompact 2013 Ford Fiesta by a nose when it comes to fuel economy. The 2013 Ford Fiesta with a 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine and six-speed automatic transmission returns 29 mpg in city driving and 39 mpg on the highway, according to the EPA.

The fuel-saving Mazda 6 achieves a fuel economy rating that is rare in a car that is not a hybrid or a diesel. It also trumps the fuel-ratings of many of its midsize competitors, including the 2013 Nissan Altima and the 2013 Ford Fusion.

A 2013 Nissan Altima with a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine and a six-speed automatic transmission returns 27 mpg in city driving and 38 mpg on the highway, according to the EPA. The 2013 Ford Fusion with a 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine and a six-speed manual transmission returns 25 mpg in city driving and 37 mpg on the highway, according to the EPA.

The 2014 Mazda 6 with i-Eloop technology debuts at a time when gas prices are relatively stable. The AAA Daily Fuel Gauge report on Monday pegged the average price for a gallon of unleaded gasoline at $3.47 versus $3.38 a year ago.

Edmunds says: The 2014 Mazda 6 with i-Eloop technology earns some major bragging rights, especially if buyers cross-shop it against some fuel-saving compacts.

Comments

  • rjett rjett Posts:

    Is a 2 mpg boost worth $2000? After a quick calculation based on highway mileage, it looks like it would save you about $76 a year at the pump (15,000 miles at $3.50 per gallon). It would take 26 years to break even on this upgrade. So I would say "no, not worth it." BUT... You get much more with that upgrade. You also get "a lane departure warning system, high beam control, radar cruise control, forward obstruction warning system, a Sport mode button and active grille shutters." I see the radar cruise control option on most cars go for around $1000 and the other options would easily exceed $1000 when combined. So I would say it IS worth it for the added features, but not if you're just looking to boost mpg.

  • Hard to believe that taking the load of the alternator off the engine (via Iloop) yields such a huge jump in fuel economy. And on the highly, there isn't much deceleration to re-charge the capacitor. Can anyone explain.

  • se_riously se_riously Posts:

    techman41973 - Based on the explanation here: http://www.mazda.com/mazdaspirit/env/i-eloop/ It appears the alternator can be de-coupled from the engine to minimize drive losses - hence the improvement in city and highway mileage. Also, the alternator can charge the capacitor whenever the gas pedal is released (coasting), not just only when braking.

  • dagmar3 dagmar3 Posts:

    The Nissan Altima does not have a six-speed automatic - it only comes with a CVT with the 4 cylinder.

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