Used 2016 Hyundai Elantra Consumer Reviews - 41 Car Reviews | Edmunds

2016 Hyundai Elantra Consumer Reviews

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Hyundai beats Honda every which way but Sunday
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
Performance
Comfort
Fuel Economy
Fun To Drive
Interior Design
Exterior Design
Build Quality
Reliability
By DrRJP
on

Vehicle

2016 Hyundai Elantra SE 4dr Sedan (1.8L 4cyl 6A)


Review

THE THREE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS to know about this car are the following: (1) how differently it performs in moist, cooler Fall and Spring weather [outstanding] versus dry, scorching Summer weather [challenging]; (2) how differently it performs from the day you drive it new out of the dealership lot versus how it performs when it's got a year's worth of mostly highway miles, and (3) the person who wrote this review obviously drove it when it was new and not when the weather was cool. I bought my 2016 Elantra SE in April 2017 as a Certified Used Car w/ a 12,000/12 month warranty. The first thing that I did was to ditch the heavy steel wheels (80 lbs total) for some sweet and light rims (56 lbs) and got rid of 24 lbs of unsprung weight. Made a big difference in the handling. The 2nd thing I did was to bump up the tire pressure to 36 psi, giving it better handling, breaking and acceleration. Speaking of acceleration, car reviewers don't seem to understand that modern, multi-speed automatic transmissions have a learning capability to adapt to your style of driving. If you drive it like the proverbial little old lady, it will shift like she walks. OTOH, if you drive like Mario Andretti, the slush box will be shifting quick, short and at maximum HP. What speeds this learning process along, as I have learned, is to put the tranny into manual mode and make all your upshifts at 5,500 to 6,000 RPM for the first month. When I first got the Elantra, it was shifting sluggishly as the reviewer said, but it soon learned how to leave Civics in its dust. I used to own Hondas, but their products started going downhill in the 2001-2008 models. My last car was a 1998 Infiniti I30. Super car that got me from Point A to Point B for 300K. I've always admired the 2015-2016 Elantras and when I was able to buy one, I became a happy camper. The size is perfect for me. I love the low front end that allows me to get in and out of places that compact cars with bigger noses just cannot negotiate. I also like the spacious interior - more so than the 2018 Elantra which, like most new cars, has enlarged the console to the detriment of leg and knee room (especially the latter). The steering is precise and gives me a pretty good feel for the road. Of course, a lot of how the Elantra drives depends on the shoes its wearing. Mine came with a set of Firestone Champion Fuel Fighters: a $90/each tire that lived up to its name because my best mileage numbers (when it was 65 degrees out) were 33.5 mpg city (avg. 40 mph) and 41.5 mpg highway (avg. 75 mph) with those tires. I have since put on a set of Sumitomo HTR Enhance that consistently give me 28 mpg city and 38 mpg highway. However, the Fuel Fighters were pretty noisy and hard while the Sumitomos are quiet and on the soft side. The front seats are very comfortable and I was afraid that I would not like them. But, they have molded to my physique just fine. The car now has 53k on it and it keeps on getting better and better. I'd love to have the car reviewer try out mine and then see if he still thinks the base engine is "sluggish." Now, there is a slight delay in starting off in 1st gear but that's because they have the idle set so low. With my left foot on the brake and my right on the gas, I add an additional 200 rpms to the idle speed and that takes care of any lag off the line. My biggest beef, however, is with the engine noise. Accelerating is when it is most noticeable. Above 4,000 rpm, it sounds like a Wal-Mart blender on Liquify. The following model years made a great improvement in both engine noise and cabin insulation. While the 2016 Elantra SE is fairly quiet at highway speeds for a car in its class, the 2018 I recently test-drove felt like a Sonata (which it almost is considering how much bigger it has grown). The bottom line is that you get a heck of a lot of goodies in a Hyundai for a little amount of money. you can keep your Mazdas, Hondas, and Furds (sic). The South Korean King of compacts is the 2016 Hyundai Elantra. Best car I've ever owned.


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Performance
Comfort
Fuel Economy
Fun To Drive
Interior Design
Exterior Design
Build Quality
Reliability
By Terry
on

Vehicle

2016 Hyundai Elantra SE 4dr Sedan (1.8L 4cyl 6M)


Review

Hit my head trying to get in 1st time very tight inside


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Good value, comfortable, but steering is awful
Performance
Comfort
Fuel Economy
Fun To Drive
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By Aaron
on

Vehicle

2016 Hyundai Elantra Value Edition 4dr Sedan (1.8L 4cyl 6A)


Review

I looked around for more than one year to find a 2016 with low miles that wasn't a rental or trashed by a previous owner. I finally found one, and I do enjoy the car, except for the steering. The steering is a drive by wire system; that is, there is no power steering pump or fluid. Apparently, there are sensors in the steering column which send signals to the steering rack. Anyway, the steering wheel binds or requires you to nudge it out of a fixed straight position while on the freeway, for example. If you tend to steer with one hand while on the freeway and rest your right arm on a handrest, for example, you'll need to learn how to drive with two hands on the wheel. Additionally, on every other car i've driven, when you come out of a turn, for example, the steering wheel recenters itself. Non on the Elantra. You have to actively return it to the center position, yourself. The car has been to two dealers who state that nothing is wrong with the car. So, before you buy a used one, I'd recommend a freeway test drive or a drive where there are slight curves in the road. The binding/stickiness occurs about 10-15 degrees to the right and left of the center wheel position, especially making minor adjustments at higher speeds.


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Sporty, Stylish, Affordable
Performance
Comfort
Fuel Economy
Fun To Drive
Interior Design
Exterior Design
Build Quality
Reliability
By LondonLad
on

Vehicle

2016 Hyundai Elantra SE 4dr Sedan (1.8L 4cyl 6M)


Review

I bought this car after comparing and test driving the Kia Forte S and the Toyota Corolla. I chose the Hyundai because out of all three, it had the most responsive engine and engaging drive, the most spacious interior, the best ergonomics - and it was the least expensive. But price wasn't the deciding factor. It's low to the ground with firm, sporty suspension that gives good road-feel without being too hard. It's quiet, responsive and has excellent brakes. The cabin is spacious and airy with good visibility. Way better than the Kia Forte, which was dark and cave-like. The only downside is the cheap finish to some of the cabin trim - silver sprayed plastic trim, which is already showing signs of wear. Lastly, the automatic transaxle has no dipstick. It's a sealed unit. Had I spotted that, I may not have bought it. But Hyundai's warranty shows their confidence in it. Time will tell.


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Avoid Manual Transmission
Performance
Comfort
Fuel Economy
Fun To Drive
Interior Design
Exterior Design
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By SandyP
on

Vehicle

2016 Hyundai Elantra SE 4dr Sedan (1.8L 4cyl 6M)


Review

I wonder how many people know that kids with ADHD have car accidents with greater frequency than their non-ADHD couterparts? Research has demonstrated this to be fact. It has also demonstrated that adolescent drivers do better in cars with manual transmissions vs automatic. With my ADHD-inattentive type soon-to-be-driver in mind, I decided to get a car with a manual transmission. I learned on one when I was 16 and loved it! The decision itself might not have been bad--getting a car with a manual transmission. What was bad was the choice of vehicle. The Hyundai Elantra has a six-speed transmission. Unfortunately reverse is RIGHT NEXT TO first gear. There is no way to tell, from the instrument panel, which gear you are in after you come to a stop. Initially this was quite unnerving but I quickly figured out, if I pushed the clutch in as I was coming to a stop, I could not shift into reverse accidentally. However, even after 25 months it is difficult to tell, if I forget to do this, whether I am in reverse or first. The other issue is that second gear sticks frequently and badly. But only about half the time. And no. This does not happen because I don't have the clutch in all the way. The other thing that is lousy is the tires Hyundai puts on their new vehicles.
I have now had three Hyundai's--Accent, Elantra, and Sonata. On all three the tires were seriously worn by 20 to 25k miles. On the current vehicle, the Elantra, the two front tires are bald and I am getting ready to replace all four. The upside on the car is the fuel economy. When driving on the highway I generally get close to 40mpg; in the city 30 to 32 mpg reliably.


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