Used 1997 Mitsubishi 3000GT Review




what's new

A value-leader base model is introduced. It has less than stellar performance and we think that it's embarrassing that this car is in the same lineup as the earth-scorching VR-4.

vehicle overview

There are many competent sports cars on the market today. They combine blazing speed with deft handling prowess and often luxurious interiors. While they all compete within the same segment, most have a distinct flavor all their own. So it is with Mitsubishi's 3000GT.

The 3000GT SL is powered by a twin-cam 3.0-liter V6 that pumps 222 horsepower through the front wheels. With the 3000GT's mass, the SL gets to 60 mph in a somewhat dawdley 8.5 seconds, but it shines brightly in the braking and cornering arenas; all at a $10,000 price advantage over its more muscular brother, the VR-4. Additionally, the SL comes with leather seating, standard. A new base model is introduced for those that want the look of performance without the prohibitive price. It produces a measly 161-horsepower and 185 foot-pounds of torque, hardly more than the base Eclipse.

All-wheel drive, a twin-turbo V6, and gobs of torque characterize the 3000GT VR-4. The VR-4 offers blistering acceleration, but due to its hefty curb weight, suffers slight reductions in braking and cornering ability over the more subdued SL. However, most snow belt enthusiasts will likely prefer the 3000GT VR4.

The Spyder provides convertible fun with hardtop practicality. A retractable hardtop conveniently folds down in about 30 seconds giving passengers the thrill of open-air motoring without the worry of having your top slashed next time you are at the mall.

Inside, drivers are protected by dual airbags that reside in a scooped and binnacled dashboard that could double as the interior of the Batmobile. Generally, ergonomics are good, but we prefer a more restrained driving environment.






edmunds expert review process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.