2020 Subaru WRX

MSRP range: $27,495 - $42,695
(13)
MSRP$29,083
Edmunds suggests you pay$26,376

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2020 Subaru WRX Review

  • Spacious cabin with excellent outward visibility
  • Entertaining handling and steering response on twisty roads
  • Full-time all-wheel drive enhances traction and performance
  • Offers several premium safety options
  • Lurchy full-throttle shifts
  • Excessive wind and road noise
  • Interior quality lags that of competitors
  • STI's high-performance suspension makes for a rough ride
  • Redesigned front bumper for the WRX STI
  • Keyless access and push-button start now standard on the WRX STI
  • The WRX adds welcome lighting
  • Part of the third WRX generation introduced for 2015

The Subaru WRX may have its roots in the speedy world of rally racing, where roads can change from dirt to gravel to asphalt in a single run, but today's WRX is also a fast and legitimate family car with a roomy interior, good visibility and comfortable seats.

Vestiges of the 2020 Subaru WRX's rally roots are found in the standard all-wheel-drive system and its small but powerful turbocharged four-cylinder engine. While these tools help rally racers handle different road surfaces and speed away from corners, their real-life application will prove useful for drivers in wet climates or threading city traffic.

Drivers will find the standard 268-horsepower WRX comfortable and commuter-friendly — it's even available with a continuously variable automatic transmission and a suite of advanced driver safety aids — while the 310-hp WRX STI is for purists only. You can still drive it on the street every day, but its stiff suspension and lack of an automatic transmission limit its appeal.

For 2020, the WRX adds a few small, fresh details. The STI trim gets a subtle, new front-end look and now comes standard with keyless entry and push-button start. The standard WRX, meanwhile, adds welcome lighting to its feature set. It's worth noting that an all-new next-generation WRX is expected for the 2021 model year.

While the WRX models aren't as quiet or refined as their competitors, you won't find sport sedans with more power and all-wheel drive for less money. But there are some competitors worth considering. The Honda Civic Si and Type R, as well as the Volkswagen Golf GTI and Golf R, offer superior fuel economy and quieter, nicer interiors. The recently redesigned Hyundai Veloster is worth a look. Or if you want to go a slightly different direction, the Dodge Charger is a roomy sedan with robust V6 or V8 engine power.

EdmundsEdmunds' Expert Rating
Rated for you by America’s best test team
The WRX's combination of a high-performance engine and standard all-wheel drive is rare for a small performance car. If you drive it hard, the WRX can be relatively quick in a straight line, and handling is entertaining. Unfortunately, unrefined or unavailable in-car tech, a bumpy ride, sluggish throttle response in town, and a high cost of entry are all major deterrents. We'd recommend taking a closer look at one of its many highly skilled rivals.
There was a time when the WRX was a class benchmark in terms of speed and driving. But that time has passed. Acceleration is a surprisingly jerky and unpleasant experience. Full-throttle shifts cause massive lurches forward, and leaving the line quickly requires a launch technique that we feel is mechanically abusive.

Once you're up to speed, though, the WRX becomes more entertaining. Around corners, the WRX has decent grip and changes direction quickly. The steering wheel relates information the way you'd want it to. The Brembo brakes are easy to use in routine driving, and we didn't experience any fade in high-performance driving.
For a high-performance small car, the WRX is pretty competent in the comfort department. The optional Recaro seats are well bolstered and easy to adjust. Ride quality is less impressive. Small bumps aren't an issue, but large bumps and highway imperfections definitely upset the ride. There's also plenty of wind noise generated around the mirrors while on the highway.

The WRX's climate control blows cold air fast even on a hot day. The automatic controls are easy to set and forget. Two-level heated seats up front are quick to warm up too.
One of the highlights of driving a WRX is the interior's spacious and airy feel. The cabin is roomy enough to fit four adults easily, with large door openings that make it easy to slide into or out of all four major seating positions. Visibility is excellent, with thin roof pillars and large windows as well as a big windshield to see through.

The cabin is well laid out, with logically arranged and easy-to-learn controls. Unfortunately, the driving position is a bit funky because of the steering wheel's limited tilt adjustment. Also, the center armrest is located too far back to be useful.
The crisp-looking touchscreen in the WRX Premium is aesthetically pleasing, and it responds to commands quickly. Smartphone connection via USB is quick as well, with standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

Once you start operating Subaru's Starlink system, however, things begin to fall apart. Audio quality is substandard and the options list is missing several features. Navigation isn't available, voice controls are difficult to use, and on manual transmission-equipped cars, you don't have access to Subaru's suite of safety features, which includes adaptive cruise control, forward collision mitigation and lane departure warning.
Whether you're comparing the WRX to its hatchback or sedan rivals, it falls behind class leaders in terms of cargo space and small-item storage. In both categories, it's got enough space to get by, but it doesn't offer any smart solutions in the interior. It also doesn't offer a particularly spacious trunk at 12 cubic feet.

If you're buying a WRX with a child seat in mind, there's plenty of space in the back seat, with easily accessed anchor points and enough room for a large rear-facing seat. Load-in should be easy thanks to the wide-opening doors.
The WRX has some of the worst fuel economy in its class by EPA standards. With the manual transmission, the WRX gets an estimated 23 mpg combined, which is lower than even high-performance rivals such as the Civic Type R (25 mpg). On our highway-heavy 115-mile evaluation route, our test WRX averaged 24.1 mpg, which indicates the EPA figures should be pretty accurate.
You have to really want a WRX to buy a WRX. Fuel economy ratings are some of the worst in the class, interior quality is uninspiring, and the price can be hard to justify when you start considering the missing features. Our test vehicle was $35,529, which is nearly what you'll pay to get the vastly superior Civic Type R.

For the class, the WRX's warranty is average: offering three years/36,000 miles of basic coverage, five years/60,000 miles of powertrain coverage and corrosion coverage for five years/unlimited miles. Roadside assistance lasts the life of the basic warranty.
The WRX moves quickly between corners, but it does so with less poise than most of its competition. If you've driven a car that's been modified with go-fast aftermarket parts, it's sort of like that — an assortment of upgrades that don't quite play well together. If you're committed to getting a performance Impreza, we think the STI holds a bit more sway in this category, even if it is significantly less comfortable on the open road.

Which WRX does Edmunds recommend?

The high-performance STI sure looks good on paper. But its high-strung engine, harsh suspension and manual-transmission-only configuration mean it's best left to hardcore enthusiasts. For everyone else, the WRX Premium is a better place to start. It comes with a larger touchscreen infotainment system and can be optioned with additional performance and safety features.

Subaru WRX models

The 2020 Subaru WRX is a five-passenger sedan offered in five standard trim levels: base, Premium, Limited, STI and STI Limited.

Base WRX models come reasonably well equipped, starting with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine (268 hp, 258 lb-ft of torque), a six-speed manual transmission and all-wheel drive. Performance tires and 17-inch wheels bolster handling capability, while inside you'll find cloth upholstery, 60/40-split folding rear seats and a leather-wrapped steering wheel. Tech features include a 6.5-inch touchscreen, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay support, Bluetooth, satellite radio and a rearview camera.

The WRX Premium, our recommended trim, adds upgrades such as a sunroof, heated front seats and a 7-inch touchscreen. Moving up to the Limited brings enhancements such as adaptive LED headlights, a power-adjustable driver's seat and leather upholstery.

Both the Premium and Limited trims offer options, such as an automatic transmission. With this feature, the WRX also adds Subaru's EyeSight system, which bundles adaptive cruise control, automatic emergency braking, lane departure warning, and other driving aids together into a single package. EyeSight cannot be paired with the manual transmission.

Premium trims with the manual transmission can add the Performance package with Recaro sport seats and upgraded brakes. Limited models can also get a navigation system and premium Harman Kardon audio system.

STI models come similarly equipped to the WRX Premium but with a larger engine and more power (310 horsepower, 290 lb-ft of torque), upgraded Brembo brakes and differentials, reworked steering, and more aggressive suspension tuning. STI models are only available with the six-speed manual transmission.

Finally, the STI Limited adds a sunroof, Recaro sport seats, leather upholstery, navigation, and the upgraded Harman Kardon audio system. The lone option is a low-profile trunk lip spoiler.

Consumer reviews

Read what other owners think about the 2020 Subaru WRX.

5 star reviews: 84%
4 star reviews: 7%
3 star reviews: 0%
2 star reviews: 0%
1 star reviews: 9%
Average user rating: 4.6 stars based on 13 total reviews

Trending topics in reviews

  • handling & steering
  • value
  • driving experience
  • visibility
  • spaciousness
  • oil
  • safety
  • maintenance & parts
  • acceleration
  • transmission
  • interior
  • seats
  • comfort
  • reliability & manufacturing quality
  • engine
  • appearance
  • road noise
  • fuel efficiency
  • dashboard
  • electrical system
  • climate control
  • steering wheel
  • wheels & tires
  • sound system
  • infotainment system
  • technology
  • ride quality
  • lights

Most helpful consumer reviews

5 out of 5 stars, Simple and raw, hard to find attributes nowadays.
Canucked,
4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M)

TL;DR: Seat adjustment is lacking on the Base and the manual trans makes itself just a little bit more difficult to use. But overall the car is simple and raw. It feels great and I love it to bits. The base model WRX doesn't feel like you cheaped out. The only other options I would've liked would be the Performance Package which is only available from Premium Trim and up. However, that adds a lot of weight and price to the car which I can live without. My only serious issue with the interior is the driver's seat. The base has a basic manual adjustable, non-heated, fabric seat. Manual adjustment is fine, you set it once for life basically unless you share the car with someone and it's a whole bunch lighter than motorized seats. I would've like heated seats but a sacrifice I was willing to make to keep the price down. The big issue I have with the seat is no lumber adjustment at all. And even worse: no adjustment for your thighs/ knees. It's a common grumble amongst owners. The position and travel path of the clutch brings you in forward towards the dash but that squishes your legs if you are taller and the front of the seat cushion does not adjust up to meet and support your thighs. The only other grumble I have is kind of a broad complaint of how shifting works with the 6MT and this engine. First and foremost, I am not a veteran of the stick shift. I have only driven other people's cars with it twice before buying this car. I stalled it 6 times getting it home, mostly at lights trying to get away too quickly. I am getting better, that's me not the car. While shifting the 6MT (mine has the short throw shifter as well) is satisfying and entertaining and rewarding there are 3 things that make it somewhat challenging. First is the clutch and it's travel which is sort of up and towards the dash rather than more of a natural forward push towards the firewall. Not a huge deal but it does play into the seat not being super comfy. Second problem you may or may not notice depending on what your past cars have been is the throttle mapping. It's not linear, meaning 10% throttle does not mean you are using 10% of the engines power or load. There is a point where the slightest adjustment of the throttle will make your seemingly under control revs go shooting up while you're trying to shift. Third is the rev hang which is well documented and grumbled about with this engine but it's definitely noticeable and often gets in the way. It's a deliberate feature that holds engine revs up when you depress the clutch. It helps with downshifting a bit. However, it is always on and works when you are up shifting as well. The shift from 1st to 2nd is where you will notice it the most. Say you take off in first nice and smooth, rev to 3k, depress the clutch to go into 2nd. Pretty standard right? The problem is at that point 2nd is usually between 1500 and 2k rpm and your engine is holding you at 3k for at least a full second. That particular shift is something I am still trying to smooth out and master. This transmission is not the easiest in the world. It's a bit old fashioned and the only assist is the spotty hill assist which you have 0 control over. It makes it a bit of a learning curve but it's not super difficult. I am confident driving it in any situation and I've only been at it for 5 days. That was a lot of words to describe just an issue with seat adjustment and a couple shifting woes but I think the detail will help some people. Things I like about the car: The simplicity of the base model. It feels a lot like my first car, a 1996 Impreza, but obviously much quicker and more exciting. Visibility is incredible. It has the same "fishbowl" feel as the older Subaru's I've driven. There is a ton of space in this car, including the rear seats which can actually fit full size adults. They've maintained the mechanical feel of the car despite the electric power steering and drive-by-wire throttle. I am a huge fan of hydraulic power steering but this electric steering is surprisingly good. The only difference I've noticed is the lack of a bit of "rubber banding" feel from a hydraulic steering set up. Finally: obviously the car is pretty and obviously the car is quick. There are tons of videos on its performance available for you to peruse.

5 out of 5 stars, It isn't a Lexus, it's a sports car
Wasatch John,
Limited 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M)

I've read numerous reviews before buying my WRX. It receives great ratings for acceleration and handling. Most reviews have scored it low for ride and amenities. This a sports car! The ride is firm like it should be, yes the road noise does come through, but in my opinion it's not distracting. As far as amenities go, I have the Limited with the Harmon Kardon stereo and Nav. It has just the right amount of things I need. Some higher end cars have more things that are in my opinion too much and I would never use them. The WRX to me has the right balance for a performance sports sedan.

5 out of 5 stars, 2020 STI v 2018 WRX
Krish Bellamkonda,
STI 4dr Sedan AWD (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M)

@6mos- STIll loving it :-) As the title says, I traded in a 2018 WRX base for a 2020 STI base. 2018 WRX was a great car, with excellent driving dynamics, awesome value and more than enough power for tooling around town. I was averaging 30 mpg consistently with spirited driving giving me around 25 mpg on premium gas. Life was good, but given the 2020 STI might be the last of the kind, I decided to test drive it and see if I wanted an upgrade. I had concerns over the ride quality, clutch engagement and general refinement which was a tad below WRX due to an older powertrain dating back to 2004. But I came back very impressed on how well it drove, how engaging it was compared to 2018 WRX. Since I believe cars should be left the way they came from the factory(no aftermarket engine tuning), I decided to move to a STI. STI Strengths:- STIs drive very differently from the WRX. It is a much mature car at higher speeds and also the engine is free-r revving to redline. Although they look the same, the cars are entirely different from dynamics point of view. Also with the drivetrain's ability to switch between rear-bias to front-bias and drive modes(S,S#), the car handles like extremely well. The ride quality of 2020 is way improved over 2017 STI, but not as supple as WRX base trim(17 inch wheels).But suspension tuning and all the reviews about STI's ride harshness is exaggerated. If suspension is holding you back from STI, you should really test-drive the car. The car(STI) is much quieter with more quality materials than base WRX. Although with WRX and STI, quietness is not the forte of either. STIs offer very predictable handling and what I observe is that more you engage with the car, more you pay attention to the shift points and nuances of clutch engagement, it is way more rewarding than WRX. Also the WRX has very irritating lumpy power delivery where you get abrupt dropoffs when you rev hard. STI is way smoother and has much more linearity in the way power is delivered. Also, the clutch engagement point more sorted out than WRX although it is a tad harder. The shifter is much nicer with clear throws(with STI short shift kit). It is way shorter than WRX(with short shift kit). It feels more direct in terms of engagement and also, vibrations. With STI, my gas mileage is between 20-23 mpg. It has gone below 20 during the break-in period. So gas mileage is definitely not one of the strengths of this aging engine. But my goal was to become a better driver(more technical) and also take the vehicle to track in stock form at some point. STI is like 9/10s of a budget sports car which needs 9/10s of engagement from the driver to have fun, where WRX is like 6/10s of a budget sports car which needs 6/10s of engagement from the driver to have fun. Which brings us to WRX strengths. WRX Strengths:- Whereas WRX is a much more chuckable, agile car with predictable body roll/handling, STI is more of a heavier feeling car(hydraulic power steering) with little/no body roll and more precise handling and built for more serious, precise driving. WRX is lot more fun than STI in "chuckability' factor and puts a smile no matter how you drive it. The ease of driving WRX is something I miss with the STI. STI is meant for more track duty and this is where it is a bit of a letdown "around town". So STI is more technical than WRX. So if you deeply engage with the vehicle it is fun, Whereas WRX is fun no matter whether you deeply engage or merely engage. So for a daily driver, I would pick WRX over STI to put you in a better mood no matter how your day has been. Also it is easier to drive, when it comes to overall effort. I have a Corolla Hybrid which I use for daily drive, so I don't miss WRX as much. In addition, gas mileage for WRX (30 avg, 25 worst) is amazing for a car a that's as much fun as it is. Also, the turbo spooling and whine is something which is more audible and fun with WRX. In STI, it is replaced by rumble. I personally liked WRX turbo whine better. Also, WRX has better overall drivetrain vibration management than STI. STI shifter(being direct, not cable) has a constant vibration which exaggerates over bad roads. It is not a big deal, but it does irritate you, depending on how engaged you are. In short, if you don't want to be engaged at 9/10s, then WRX is a vehicle for you. Because STI does not tolerate relaxed driving as much as a WRX. So, in short WRX or STI are awesome choices for a 4 day near-sports car. For STI comparisons, I test drove Civic Type R and I didn't like the ergonomics nor lack of AWD. Golf Type R is very boring. For WRX comparisons, I test drove Civic Si, VW GTI and it didn't compare to WRX fun. Previously, I have owned 2008 & 2013 BMW 328i manual, 2017 Audi A4 Quattro(with auto-bad mistake for my driving style), 2007 Honda Civic Si sedan and the WRX and STI made me a believer in Subaru brand for the type of driver I am (semi-sporty 4 door compact manual car enthusiast). Save the manuals!

5 out of 5 stars, Near perfection
Moshpits,
4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M)

There’s so many perfect things about this car that make up for some of its negative aspects. I went with the base model for many reasons, at 2k rpms the turbo starts taking off and at 2500 it’s fully active. Handles corners like it’s nothing but the tires are really decent for summer tires only. Car looks beautiful it appeals to that inner child that wants to have a race car and it has a nice amount of power. The 6mt is pretty damn good as well, I say pretty good because the clutch pedal is where the problem begins. The way it’s compressed is uncomfortable with the seats provided. It really causes my right leg to throb and hurt when driving for longer than an hour. Luckily that’s usually only once a month on a 4 hour trip. But I’m trying to figure that one out, most likely just have the bottom padding replaced with something actually comfortable, it’s rock hard. The upper part of the seat is perfectly fine for me a 190lb 6,3 man. The lower seat tho is horrible. It’s pretty easy to stall the car even if you’ve been driving clutch for over 8 years, it’s not at all the same so keep that in mind. There are some things you can do to remedy this issue but they void they warranty at most dealerships so be aware of that. Infotainment center is alright it’s about the same as my 2018 Impreza base hatch manual, it’s alright no complaints, in fact it’s cool it comes with a CD player I’ll never use :D. Speakers in the base are just alright, they have some decent bass for being a cheap speaker but as an audiophile the Rockford and harmons aren’t worth the price. So for me I’ll have aftermarket ones soon enough, I already threw 2 10’s on the stock stereo and it helps immensely but the deck needs to go if you want really good sound control and quality. Especially if you want a more clear bass. But for now it gets the job done and is good enough for a year or so. The turbo whine is amazing. It’s not super loud sadly but a boomba bpv not bov, will make you fall in love with the car every time you let off the throttle. The fa20 is reliable And I have yet to see anyone have real issues with a stock one. My only complaint is again the clutch engagement and the seat padding. It is very stiff if your coming from an Impreza but you will get over it within the first day or 2. The interior in the 2020 base is still really nice, I don’t know what kind of interior others are wanting but for me it looks amazing, I also liked the base Impreza hatch interior though. Fake carbon fiber still looks cool. Headlights are actually bright enough in my small town that I didn’t have to replace the bulbs like I did on the Impreza. We don’t have many lit up roads so I’m glad the base headlights do really well. I’ll replace them soon with aftermarket headlights but they’re perfectly fine. No complaints other than they don’t look that pretty but 400$ can get you a nice pair of headlights. Overall an extremely fun car, on the highway I’ve been averaging 32 mpg at around 80 mph even with some hills. City I get about 28. If I’m spirited driving then it drops about 2 or 3 mpg. So really great gas mileage either way. Way more than they advertise it gets and I’m not even trying much to get good gas mileage it just does well by itself. Gotta give the fa some credit. It really does do well for gas mileage. If your thinking about this car and you aren’t sure I’d say go test drive one and take a day or more to think about it. The summer tires are the only other downside depending on where you live. Since I just got mine and it’s almost fall I need all seasons or winter tires very shortly here. So sadly I’ve gotta cough up more money on that since I live in Colorado and it can snow heavy here. I’ve driven a 2018 Mercedes g wagon with 566hp and similar tq numbers, while it was faster, it didn’t feel as good as this wrx does. And it’s not even close to the 180k price tag for the g wagon. The steering in the 2018 g wagon was all over the place as well, apparently the 2019 and up have a different steering rack but either way, for what this wrx costs and what it does stock is crazy. Love the car so damn much, it’s hard to not smile when driving it. Subaru did a very good job making it more friendly to people who don’t know much about turbo cars. So maybe down the road you can get them for a bit cheaper and still have a solid car even if the owner doesn’t know what they’re doing. But we will see. Maybe the fa20 has an issue that only time will let us know. As it sits it’s an amazing car especially for the price.

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2020 Subaru WRX video

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NOTE: This video is about the 2019 Subaru WRX, but since the 2020 Subaru WRX is part of the same generation, our earlier analysis still applies.

Subaru has finally brought one of its limited-edition, super-hot S cars to the U.S.: the 2019 WRX STI S209. Subaru says this is the fastest STI it has ever made. But with only 200 being produced, you may never get the chance to find out. Edmunds News Editor Will Kaufman gets up close with the super Subaru at the Detroit Auto Show.

WILL KAUFMAN: Subaru fans rejoice. Subaru is finally bringing one of their limited run special edition STI models to the United States. And this one is a United States-only model. In recent years, it seems like the STI hasn't quite been getting the love it deserves. It's running an older engine on an older platform. In order to keep the car fresh, Subaru Technica International, Subaru's skunkworks, has gone over the car from nose to tail, making a bunch of changes to make it faster, more aggressive, better handling, and more desirable. From the outside, some of the changes are pretty obvious. Fender flares have been added, widening the car's track by about 1.7 inches. That means that this STI wears the widest tires on any Subaru yet. You'll also notice the carbon fiber roof to reduce weight, and the carbon fiber wing to increase downforce. Under the hood, you'll still find an EJ motor, but in S209, Subaru has added a larger HKS turbo charger. They've upgraded the intercooler. They've upgraded the pistons. They've done a lot of work to bring the power in this motor up to 341 horsepower. STI has also done a lot of work on this STI's suspension. They've overhauled a lot of the components under there. They've added bigger brakes for better stopping power as well. The only transmission you're going to find on an S209 is the six speed manual, which is the way things should be. Inside the, cabin along with some minor visual updates, you'll also find a little paddle on the steering wheel that lets you spray water onto the turbo intercooler, a nod to older STIs. Subaru is only going to be making 200 of the 2019 WRX STI S209. So if you want one, you should get in line now. For more information about the 2019 Subaru WRS STI S209, sure to check out our full first look on edmunds.com/roadnoise. And for more videos like this, stay tuned right here to YouTube. Make sure to like and subscribe.

Features & Specs

Premium 4dr Sedan AWD features & specs
Premium 4dr Sedan AWD
2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M
MSRP$29,795
MPG 21 city / 27 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission6-speed manual
Horsepower268 hp @ 5600 rpm
See all for sale
STI 4dr Sedan AWD features & specs
STI 4dr Sedan AWD
2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M
MSRP$36,995
MPG 16 city / 22 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission6-speed manual
Horsepower310 hp @ 6000 rpm
See all for sale
4dr Sedan AWD features & specs
4dr Sedan AWD
2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M
MSRP$27,495
MPG 21 city / 27 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission6-speed manual
Horsepower268 hp @ 5600 rpm
See all for sale
Limited 4dr Sedan AWD features & specs
Limited 4dr Sedan AWD
2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M
MSRP$32,095
MPG 21 city / 27 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission6-speed manual
Horsepower268 hp @ 5600 rpm
See all for sale
See all 2020 Subaru WRX specs & features

Safety

Our experts’ favorite WRX safety features:

EyeSight Assist Monitor
Projects alerts and warnings (about pedestrians, potential collisions) into a head-up display on the windshield.
Reverse Automatic Braking System
Automatically applies the brakes if the driver fails to respond to alerts and obstacles while backing up.
EyeSight Lane Keep Assist
Recognizes lane markings on both sides of the car and will guide you back to the middle if you drift too far from the center.

NHTSA Overall Rating 5 out of 5 stars

The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration offers independent analysis.

Frontal Barrier Crash RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Driver4 / 5
Passenger5 / 5
Side Crash RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Side Barrier RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Driver5 / 5
Passenger5 / 5
Combined Side Barrier & Pole RatingsRating
Front Seat5 / 5
Back Seat5 / 5
RolloverRating
Rollover5 / 5
Dynamic Test ResultNo Tip
Risk Of Rollover10.1%

IIHS Rating

The Insurance Institute of Highway Safety uses extensive crash tests to determine car safety.

Side Impact Test
Good
Roof Strength Test
Good
Rear Crash Protection / Head Restraint
Good
IIHS Small Overlap Front TestNot Tested
Moderate Overlap Front Test
Good

Subaru WRX vs. the competition

Subaru WRX vs. Subaru BRZ

The BRZ is smaller and less expensive, but beyond that, its two-door, rear-wheel-drive layout presents an entirely different driving experience than the turbocharged and all-wheel-drive WRX. Think of the WRX as a fast, family-friendly sedan and the BRZ as an entry-level sports car. Alas, "sports car" only applies to the BRZ's handling since its less powerful engine means it's slower than the WRX.

Compare Subaru WRX & Subaru BRZ features

Subaru WRX vs. Honda Civic

The Civic Si is enjoyable to drive, but its greatest attribute compared to the Subaru WRX is value. The Honda costs less, and though it has no options, it comes with more standard features. While the Civic Si is not available with an automatic transmission, it's rated by the EPA at 29 mpg combined versus the stick-shift WRX's 23 mpg combined.

Compare Subaru WRX & Honda Civic features

Subaru WRX vs. Volkswagen Golf GTI

The GTI doesn't pack quite as much power as the WRX, but it's a similarly fun and engaging "driver's car" that can also be ordered with a six-speed manual transmission. The GTI rides with a bit more civility than the Subaru, and its interior is miles ahead in quality, style and refinement. But the Golf is front-wheel-drive and only comes in a hatchback body style, giving the WRX a handling edge in dry or wet conditions and, depending on your preference, more or less utility.

Compare Subaru WRX & Volkswagen Golf GTI features

FAQ

Is the Subaru WRX a good car?

The Edmunds experts tested the 2020 WRX both on the road and at the track, giving it a 7.9 out of 10. You probably care about Subaru WRX fuel economy, so it's important to know that the WRX gets an EPA-estimated 19 mpg to 23 mpg, depending on the configuration. What about cargo capacity? When you're thinking about carrying stuff in your new car, keep in mind that the WRX has 12.0 cubic feet of trunk space. And then there's safety and reliability. Edmunds has all the latest NHTSA and IIHS crash-test scores, plus industry-leading expert and consumer reviews to help you understand what it's like to own and maintain a Subaru WRX. Learn more

What's new in the 2020 Subaru WRX?

According to Edmunds’ car experts, here’s what’s new for the 2020 Subaru WRX:

  • Redesigned front bumper for the WRX STI
  • Keyless access and push-button start now standard on the WRX STI
  • The WRX adds welcome lighting
  • Part of the third WRX generation introduced for 2015
Learn more

Is the Subaru WRX reliable?

To determine whether the Subaru WRX is reliable, read Edmunds' authentic consumer reviews, which come from real owners and reveal what it's like to live with the WRX. Look for specific complaints that keep popping up in the reviews, and be sure to compare the WRX's average consumer rating to that of competing vehicles. Learn more

Is the 2020 Subaru WRX a good car?

There's a lot to consider if you're wondering whether the 2020 Subaru WRX is a good car. Edmunds' expert testing team reviewed the 2020 WRX and gave it a 7.9 out of 10. Safety scores, fuel economy, cargo capacity and feature availability should all be factors in determining whether the 2020 WRX is a good car for you. Learn more

How much should I pay for a 2020 Subaru WRX?

The least-expensive 2020 Subaru WRX is the 2020 Subaru WRX 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M). Including destination charge, it arrives with a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of about $27,495.

Other versions include:

  • Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) which starts at $29,795
  • STI 4dr Sedan AWD (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M) which starts at $36,995
  • 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) which starts at $27,495
  • Limited 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) which starts at $32,095
  • STI Limited 4dr Sedan AWD w/Wing (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M) which starts at $41,695
  • Limited 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo CVT) which starts at $33,995
  • STI Limited 4dr Sedan AWD w/Low Profile Trunk Spoiler (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M) which starts at $41,695
  • Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo CVT) which starts at $31,695
  • STI Series.White 4dr Sedan AWD (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M) which starts at $42,695
  • Series.White 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) which starts at $33,995
Learn more

What are the different models of Subaru WRX?

If you're interested in the Subaru WRX, the next question is, which WRX model is right for you? WRX variants include Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M), STI 4dr Sedan AWD (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M), 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M), and Limited 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M). For a full list of WRX models, check out Edmunds’ Features & Specs page. Learn more

More about the 2020 Subaru WRX

2020 Subaru WRX Overview

The 2020 Subaru WRX is offered in the following submodels: WRX STI Series.White, WRX STI Limited, WRX Sedan, WRX STI. Available styles include Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M), STI 4dr Sedan AWD (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M), 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M), Limited 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M), STI Limited 4dr Sedan AWD w/Wing (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M), Limited 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo CVT), STI Limited 4dr Sedan AWD w/Low Profile Trunk Spoiler (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M), Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo CVT), STI Series.White 4dr Sedan AWD (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M), and Series.White 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M).

What do people think of the 2020 Subaru WRX?

Consumer ratings and reviews are also available for the 2020 Subaru WRX and all its trim types. Overall, Edmunds users rate the 2020 WRX 4.6 on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. Edmunds consumer reviews allow users to sift through aggregated consumer reviews to understand what other drivers are saying about any vehicle in our database. Detailed rating breakdowns (including performance, comfort, value, interior, exterior design, build quality, and reliability) are available as well to provide shoppers with a comprehensive understanding of why customers like the 2020 WRX.

Edmunds Expert Reviews

Edmunds experts have compiled a robust series of ratings and reviews for the 2020 Subaru WRX and all model years in our database. Our rich content includes expert reviews and recommendations for the 2020 WRX featuring deep dives into trim levels and features, performance, mpg, safety, interior, and driving. Edmunds also offers expert ratings, road test and performance data, long-term road tests, first-drive reviews, video reviews and more.

Our Review Process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.

What's a good price for a New 2020 Subaru WRX?

2020 Subaru WRX STI 4dr Sedan AWD (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M)

The 2020 Subaru WRX STI 4dr Sedan AWD (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $38,723. The average price paid for a new 2020 Subaru WRX STI 4dr Sedan AWD (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M) is trending $3,770 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,770 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $34,953.

The average savings for the 2020 Subaru WRX STI 4dr Sedan AWD (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M) is 9.7% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 3 2020 Subaru WRX STI 4dr Sedan AWD (2.5L 4cyl Turbo 6M) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2020 Subaru WRX Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M)

The 2020 Subaru WRX Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $31,251. The average price paid for a new 2020 Subaru WRX Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) is trending $3,198 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,198 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $28,053.

The average savings for the 2020 Subaru WRX Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) is 10.2% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 10 2020 Subaru WRX Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2020 Subaru WRX 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M)

The 2020 Subaru WRX 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $28,527. The average price paid for a new 2020 Subaru WRX 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) is trending $2,734 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $2,734 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $25,793.

The average savings for the 2020 Subaru WRX 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) is 9.6% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 21 2020 Subaru WRX 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2020 Subaru WRX Limited 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M)

The 2020 Subaru WRX Limited 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $35,911. The average price paid for a new 2020 Subaru WRX Limited 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) is trending $3,343 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,343 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $32,568.

The average savings for the 2020 Subaru WRX Limited 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) is 9.3% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 2 2020 Subaru WRX Limited 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6M) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2020 Subaru WRX Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo CVT)

The 2020 Subaru WRX Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo CVT) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $33,524. The average price paid for a new 2020 Subaru WRX Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo CVT) is trending $3,108 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,108 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $30,416.

The average savings for the 2020 Subaru WRX Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo CVT) is 9.3% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 1 2020 Subaru WRX Premium 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo CVT) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

Which 2020 Subaru WRXES are available in my area?

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2020 Subaru WRX for sale near. There are currently 84 new 2020 WRXES listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $28,527 and mileage as low as 0 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a car from our massive database to find cheap vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the 2020 Subaru WRX. Then select Edmunds special offers, perks, deals, and incentives to contact the dealer of your choice and save up to $2,526 on a used or CPO 2020 WRX available from a dealership near you.

Can't find a new 2020 Subaru WRXs you want in your area? Consider a broader search.

Find a new Subaru for sale - 1 great deals out of 5 listings starting at $9,744.

Why trust Edmunds?

Edmunds has deep data on over 6 million new, used, and certified pre-owned vehicles, including rich, trim-level features and specs information like: MSRP, average price paid, warranty information (basic, drivetrain, and maintenance), features (upholstery, bluetooth, navigation, heated seating, cooled seating, cruise control, parking assistance, keyless ignition, satellite radio, folding rears seats ,run flat tires, wheel type, tire size, wheel tire, sunroof, etc.), vehicle specifications (engine cylinder count, drivetrain, engine power, engine torque, engine displacement, transmission), fuel economy (city, highway, combined, fuel capacity, range), vehicle dimensions (length, width, seating capacity, cargo space), car safety, true cost to own. Edmunds also provides tools to allow shopper to compare vehicles to similar models of their choosing by warranty, interior features, exterior features, specifications, fuel economy, vehicle dimensions, consumer rating, edmunds rating, and color.

Should I lease or buy a 2020 Subaru WRX?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

Check out Subaru lease specials