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Used 1999 Mercedes-Benz E-Class Consumer Reviews

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$5,521 - $8,952

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4.75 out of 5 stars

Crossing 275k

riccar1, 06/12/2014
1999 Mercedes-Benz E-Class E320 4dr Sedan
33 of 33 people found this review helpful

Couldn't be a happier owner. Purchased a formerly leased car with 43,000 miles and have just crossed 275,000 miles with zero problems of any significance. Of course have had some things wear out that are normal, but the car remains powerful and absolutely dependable. Much better car than the 1990 Lexus 400 it replaced in 2003.

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4 out of 5 stars

last of the bank vault Benzs

jr17, 11/14/2012
1999 Mercedes-Benz E-Class E320 4MATIC 4dr Sedan AWD
74 of 76 people found this review helpful

I know my MB's trust me on this. The 96-99 E class is by far the best years of the E class. DO NOT buy a 2000 or newer. I have 215k on mine. Paint is starting to fade a bit, a little rattle in the Cat Conv other than that, it drives and runs like new. Chrysler ruined the name from 2000 to like 2007 or roughly around there. They tried to infuse their technology into the E class at this time and failed miserably. A 2000 E class is a K car with a MB star on the hood. The 99 is heavy, solid, and feels German. It's a little underpowered, and don't buy a 4matic if you are worried about gas. If you value your family's safety, want to to stay out of trouble, and want to look cool, buy a 99

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5 out of 5 stars

It Just Keeps on Ticking!

carolyn baker, 10/12/2015
updated 08/02/2021
1999 Mercedes-Benz E-Class E320 4MATIC 4dr Sedan AWD
41 of 42 people found this review helpful

Bought my 99 e320 4matic in 02 with 78K miles. A tree fell on it in a hurricane in year 2 and creased it down the middle. I thought it would be declared as totalled. It was repaired by the insurance company at a cost of $7,000. Had the transmission replaced 2 years ago. This vehicle lgets excellent gas mileage. On the highway I get 470+ miles to a tank of gas which I believe holds 18.5 gallons (about 25 mpg highway). I absolutely love to drive this car. The header is falling down a little in the back from where the tree creased it. Otherwise, it is pretty enough. I am presently at 256,000 miles and look forward to my next road trip. Update: July 2021. I'm now at roughly 350000 miles and still ticking.

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3.88 out of 5 stars

First Car

automaniac9, 03/04/2014
1999 Mercedes-Benz E-Class E430 4dr Sedan
40 of 41 people found this review helpful

This car is an amazing piece of machinery and is the last year of the reliable Mercedes. This car having a 4.3 liter V8 just made the car a sleeper, especially considering that it had no badging anywhere. The transmission shifts almost seemlessly. It has great power and good handling, but this particular car stood out from the pack because of the real Brabus exhaust, and the replica Brabus 19" wheels. The car sounds fantastic and it isn't overly loud. The interior of this car doesn't have the flare of Mercedes of old, but it's simple and functional, and that's all you should need. The exterior is much like the interior, simple but nice to look at, especially in the white color mine was in.

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5 out of 5 stars

Makes other sedans seem unworthy.

Scott, 12/25/2017
1999 Mercedes-Benz E-Class E320 4dr Sedan
21 of 21 people found this review helpful

I've owned my '99 E320 for 15 months now and could not be more satisfied; I purchased it used with only 78k miles and now have 86k on it. This sedan is a testament to the quality of German engineering and performance! People may claim the car is expensive to repair, but show me a car from this era or later that isn't (and I've had great luck with getting parts at reasonable prices from Rock Auto). The 3-valve V6 has excellent power - it will leap to 60 in 7 seconds flat while returning 25mpg (30+ on the highway). Laser-accurate cruise control, great seats, a 21-gallon fuel tank, and typical German highway prowess enable it to leap tall states in a single bound. The suspension has the magic ability to soak up road imperfections and then firm up in the curves - body roll is almost nonexistent. I was also lucky enough to get a fully-optioned model with heated leather seats, moonroof, Bose audio, Xenon headlights, rain-sensing wipers, etc. All this for a car that only cost $4200, I've put about $2500 additional into it to make it nearly perfect. Despite all these hosannas, there are a few problem areas with the '96-02 E320s you should know about when purchasing one. 1) Rust - the MB/Chrysler merger resulted in paint quality issues due to the move to water-based paint; check for rust around the wheel arches/door edges. ALSO - early E320s also have a serious issue with rust in the front suspension spring perches - check this especially if the car has lived in the snow belt. Mine was quite obviously garaged by the POs (an elderly couple) and has neither of these issues. 2) Rear window regulators - like VWs and BMWs, the rear window regulator guides are plastic and are prone to failure. I haven't had this issue either, but I rarely use the rear windows. 3) Valve cover gaskets - these will eventually leak, and may or may not be synonymous with clogged breather passages in the upper part of the left-side valve cover (it literally has a second cover on top of the valve cover). This usually results in leakage onto the exhaust system and a lovely burning-oil bouquet wafting through the ventilation system. I did enjoy this problem and had it repaired for around $500. 4) Transmission - the '96-99 models use the 722.5 transmission which is known to have issues at higher mileage; be sure to check the transmission shifts smoothly before purchasing the car and CHANGE THE FLUID & FILTER ASAP. FYI, when you first drive the car, it's designed to not shift out of 1st until about 2500rpm to ensure the cats are at operating temp. But excessively harsh shifting or the car hanging onto gears longer than normal is a warning sign. The '00-02 models use the 722.6 transmission which is essentially bulletproof. Also the tranny electrical connector (a $10 part) is known to leak through its O-rings causing erratic shift behavior (and if left unattended, can eventually cause the fluid to wick up the wiring harness and destroy the TCM), this is a simple and inexpensive fix but often masquerades as a much more serious issue - mechanics that are not familiar with the car can mistakenly advocate replacing the entire transmission. 5) Dash displays - on the '00-02 models, the separate left/right displays on the instrument cluster for the clock and PRNDL indicator WILL fail - check the dash photos for any 00-02 model for sale online and 90% of them will have this problem. The dash display on the '96-99 models are centrally integrated and immune to this issue. It's caused by the ribbon connectors inside the cluster separating, can actually be fixed for $0 by pulling the instrument cluster and wedging a small chunk of solid foam into the ribbon connectors to force it back together, but it's a fiddly business and many shops will advise to just replace it. 6) Oil leaks - the '96-97 E320 uses the M104 (straight-six) 4-valve motor which is highly prone to oil leaks; stay away from these for this reason alone. The '98-02 models with the M112 (V6 3-valve) motors are simply superior - more power, 100lb lighter, better mileage, lower emissions, and better flexibility. 7) Catalytic converters - these are known to fail around 80-100k or so, they disintegrate inside and cause horrible rattling noises at lower engine speeds. I destroyed one of mine blowing away some moron in a brand-new Infiniti who (incorrectly) thought he could jump me at a light from the left-turn lane. His expression when I shut the door on him was nearly worth the $1200 bill for 4 new high-flow Bosal cats (to be fair only 1 failed, but to be prudent I replaced all 4 and put in 4 new Bosch oxygen sensors, which is why it was so $$$ - I could have just replaced 1 cat for around $200-$300). With a timing chain instead of a fragile belt, the 3.2 V6 is known to go 250k+ miles without a rebuild. What you can't put a price on is how this silk-turbine powered LearJet glides over the road like a puck on an air-hockey table. You'll soon forget whatever you used to drive.

Safety
5 out of 5 stars
Technology
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Interior
5 out of 5 stars
Comfort
5 out of 5 stars
Reliability
5 out of 5 stars
Value
5 out of 5 stars
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