2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite vs. 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE Comparison Test

2011 Honda Odyssey Minivan

(3.5L V6 6-speed Automatic)
  • Comparison Test: 2011 Honda Odyssey vs. 2011 Toyota Sienna Video

    Comparison Test: 2011 Honda Odyssey vs. 2011 Toyota Sienna Video | October 15, 2010

1 Video , 72 Photos

  • Comparison Test
  • Second Opinion
  • Top 14 Features
  • Data and Charts
  • Final Rankings and Scoring Explanation
  • 2011 Honda Odyssey Specs and Performance
  • 2011 Toyota Sienna Specs and Performance

Every 75 years, Halley's Comet flies past Earth. Every 50 years, a pitcher like Roy Halladay throws a no-hitter in postseason baseball. And every third furlong-per-fortnight, the heavy hitters in the minivan class redesign their vans in the same model year.

Now the 2011 Honda Odyssey and 2011 Toyota Sienna meet for the first time in an Inside Line minivan comparison test.

Not Exactly a Perfect Match
We were pleased to get hold of the all-new, top-tier 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite and discover every conceivable bit of minivan kit. This new trim level offers features previously unknown to any Honda, including a six-speed automatic transmission.

Of course, the Touring Elite model also commands a higher asking price than any previous Odyssey. Technically, there are no factory options on the entire Odyssey line, so there's no difference between the base- and the as-tested price of the $44,030 Touring Elite.

The 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE delivered to us was one rung below the range-topping Limited trim/model (base MSRP of $39,510) we tested in February. The base price for an XLE is $33,185, but ours also was equipped with the XLE Premium package and floor mats for a total of $39,734.

This $4,300 price difference appeared to favor the cheaper Sienna, since each vehicle's as-tested price is weighted 20 percent in our scoring. When we started scoring the features (click the "Top 14 Features" tab), though, we were struck by the Odyssey's impressive array of technology and conveniences, some of which aren't available on any 2011 Sienna. The list includes a blind-spot monitoring system, refrigerated storage, 5.1 surround sound for DVD playback (plus an HDMI port to go with it) and a hard drive for music storage and navigation.

Then again, Toyota offers exclusive options of its own, including a four-cylinder engine (not equipped here), all-wheel drive (also not equipped), keyless ignition, adaptive cruise, telematics and a pre-collision system (Limited only).

For a virtual price comparison, we built a comparably equipped 2011 Toyota Sienna Limited to include everything we could to match the Odyssey Touring Elite's equipment item for item. The resulting total price was $44,425, or $395 more than the better-equipped Odyssey Touring Elite.

Seats Aplenty
Without myriad seating options, minivans would be no more accommodating to families than delivery vans. While our Sienna XLE lacks the Limited's second-row lounge chairs, it has a better solution for getting people in and out of the third row. The second-row seats slide on extremely long channels, and the seat-bottom cushions tip up on the front edge while the seatbacks tilt forward — essentially making a seat-wich that pushes all the way forward toward the front row.

The Odyssey's second row doesn't slide out of the way as well, but you can remove its second-row center seat and reposition the outboard seat toward the center to create an open aisle to the third row.

Both minivans' third-row seats are reasonably comfortable, but there's a discernible (and measurable) difference in headroom. The Sienna's ceiling is 2 inches lower in the third row (and 1.4 inches lower in the second row). Granted, kids won't notice, but grandparents likely will, since child seats installed in the second row will oblige them to climb back here, arthritic knees and all — cruel but true.

Octomom should take note that all three of the Odyssey's second-row seating positions are equipped with LATCH provisions for baby seats, along with two positions in the third row, for a total of five. The Sienna offers only four LATCH-capable seats. Also, the Odyssey's second-row center seat slides fore/aft independently of the outboard seats, so reaching a child in that seat to influence his, uh, behavior is more convenient.

Overall, the seats in the Honda are firmer and more supportive laterally than the Sienna's, and indeed, the Odyssey would be our pick for a bladder-stretching long haul. Both vans have manual second- and third-row sunshades, plus tri-zone climate controls, so you can placate kids and grandparents alike.

Load Up
Since our Sienna lacked the Limited model's power-operated third row, its rearmost seats manually collapse into a deep trough via a series of straps and levers. All 2011 Odysseys have a manual-folding third row and both automakers tout one-handed operation. We found that the Honda backs up its claim better than the Toyota thanks to the Odyssey's burly handles and stronger assist springs.

Cargo capacity really isn't a concern, as both vans are absolutely huge and within a cubic foot of each other in maximum capacity. The Toyota has a slight advantage in available volume behind the third, second and first row (click the "Data and Charts" tab at the top of the page). The Sienna also has a 1-inch lower lift-over height, making it easier to hoist heavy items into the cargo bay.

Today's Minivans Are High-Tech
Technology is now a big deal in the minivan segment, particularly in premium versions of the Odyssey and Sienna where we've begun to demand seamless integration with all the expensive devices we have in the family room. The 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite has an audio/video setup that's peerless among minivans. Starting with a 650-watt amplifier and 12 speakers, it features a 15GB hard drive capable of storing 3,500 songs (listing artist/song titles if the source was Gracenote-derived).

Both minivans feature RCA, auxiliary and USB inputs; IR remote controls and headsets; and double-wide video screens that support two simultaneous 16:9 images. But only the Odyssey has that HDMI port that supports digital camcorders, Blu-ray players, laptops, gaming consoles, or even last-gen Apple TV inputs.

Although there's Bluetooth audio streaming in both vans, the Odyssey also offers a "skip and pause" feature plus verbal search capability for your iPod and the hard drive.

The navigation systems in these minivans include voice activation and real-time traffic legends. We found the Odyssey's high-def screen easier to read, while the color-coded traffic was easier to see in the Toyota. Although our Odyssey was equipped with XM Satellite Radio, Honda uses FM-derived traffic information (suggesting that future non-XM-equipped Hondas and Acuras will offer real-time traffic as well). The Sienna's nav unit is DVD-based; the Odyssey's hard-drive-based system has a speed and memory advantage.

Minivan Drag Race
Last time the 2011 Toyota Sienna went to our test track, it sprinted to 60 mph in 7.9 seconds, disgracing the soon-to-retire 2010 Honda Odyssey (8.8 seconds). This time, our Sienna XLE needed 8.0 seconds on the way to a 15.9-second, 89.6-mph quarter-mile. Note that Inside Line's testing protocol is to record performance data with stability- and traction-control systems in both "on" and "off" conditions. For this family-friendly minivan test, we're using the more realistic, default "on" values as the basis for scoring (but you can see both results in the "Specs & Performance" box to the right).

With its sharper-shifting six-speed automatic (instead of the old five-speed unit) driving its front wheels, the 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite reached 60 mph in 8.1 seconds and covered 1,320 feet in 15.9 seconds at 88.3 mph. Not only does the 2011 Odyssey keep pace with the 2011 Sienna, it does so with a significant horsepower disadvantage. Both minivans use a 3.5-liter V6, but the Odyssey is rated at 248 hp to the Sienna's 266.

Honda has also closed the fuel economy gap. Our 2011 Odyssey Touring Elite earns a 19 city/28 highway/22 combined mpg EPA fuel economy rating (compared to 17/25 for the 2010 model). The 2011 Sienna earns a slightly less frugal 18/24/20 rating.

Stop It
Honda brakes have almost become a punchline at our test track. "Soft brake pedal and very typical (10 feet!) fade after only four stops," we wrote after testing the 2010 Odyssey. "Frightening loss of pedal feel and effectiveness during acceleration runs."

And then we tested the 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite: "Moderately firm pedal from first through fifth (final) stop from 60. Moderate dive, quiet ABS, good fade resistance. Did I just write that about a Honda? Obviously, reengineering the brakes was part of the new redesign."

Indeed, Honda increased the brake rotors' size from 11.0 to 12.6 inches up front and from 12.3 to 13.1 inches in the rear, improving their ability to dissipate heat. The Odyssey's best stopping distance (129 feet) was just a foot shorter, but the feel, fade resistance and linearity of the system is dramatically better.

The Toyota Sienna's stopping distances beat the Honda by 5 feet, but our test-driver tempered his praise: "Moderately firm pedal and good fade resistance, but the ABS/EBD were a little noisy sorting out available grip. Some dive and wander, but still an average performance."

The Driver's Minivan vs. the Sienna
In handling tests, the 2011 Honda Odyssey still feels as good and responds as well as the previous-generation van. The Odyssey circled the skid pad with 0.75g lateral acceleration and posted a 59.3-mph slalom pass. The Sienna's best numbers were 0.72g and 57.9 mph. With nearly identical Michelin tires on the vans and a 59-pound weight disadvantage for the Odyssey, the Honda's advantage comes down to suspension tuning/geometry and stability control intrusiveness.

On suburban roads, the Odyssey remains the driver's minivan. The Sienna's ride is indeed softer, even floaty sometimes compared to the buttoned-down Odyssey. The Toyota's softer springs leave most of the chore of suspending the van to the dampers, which are tuned to provide pillowy interference between occupants and road imperfections. This works most of the time, but there were some maritime moments when we wished for more rebound damping.

In contrast, the Honda's firmer suspension transmits more of the road's texture, but the ride isn't busy or uncomfortable. However, if your kids are napping, the Sienna will probably keep them sawing toothpicks longer.

We also prefer the Odyssey's hydraulic-assisted power steering over the Sienna's electric-assist power steering (EPS). We know that parking lots exist and that petite drivers might prefer the Sienna's featherweight EPS, but the superior feel and precision of the Odyssey's setup feels less like a video game and more like a refined car.

Crowning the Ultimate Minivan
Though they have different personalities, the 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite and 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE both offer smart, relevant designs in packages that go a long way toward accommodating every possible desire of the modern family. There isn't another vehicle class that's so singularly focused on the very details that make it perfect for the target customer.

Sure, some say the 2011 Honda Odyssey looks like a side-by-side refrigerator-freezer. Others criticize its beltline hitch and not-so-subtle door-slider track, but whether you're talking about seating configuration or slalom performance, the Honda Odyssey Touring Elite is the ultimate minivan of 2011.

Sienna detractors might say it looks like a hospital gurney with a satin sheet thrown over it, and that it handles like a gurney to boot. However, if you're looking for an extremely low-impact, smooth and quiet minivan (or one with a four-cylinder engine or all-wheel drive), there's good reason to consider a 2011 Toyota Sienna.

The Odyssey Touring Elite is the better overall value, though, as its boatload of features easily offsets its price disadvantage versus the Toyota Sienna XLE. Moreover, the Honda's road manners will win the heart of any car-guy-turned-family-man. Forget crossovers. The 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite is the closest thing there is to an eight-passenger sport sedan.

The manufacturers provided Edmunds these vehicles for the purposes of evaluation.

Edmunds.com Associate Editor Mark Takahashi says:
The only way buyers can lose is if they choose something other than the Odyssey or Sienna. That said, I favor the Honda Odyssey for its more engaging driving dynamics and attractive styling.

The Toyota Sienna, by comparison, looks bloated and feels disconnected from the road. Driver engagement likely ranks fairly low as far as priorities go for minivans, so I'll give it a pass on that one.

Both the Odyssey and Sienna impressed with their cryptlike silence and luxury-sedan ride quality that smoothed out the choppiest of L.A. roads. Seating comfort in all three rows also came up pretty even, with a slight edge going to the Honda for headroom. Folding the third row flat also favored the Honda — a quick tug on the strap was all that was needed in the Odyssey, while the Sienna required a little more wrestling.

The Honda Odyssey lost points with me for its busy center stack and uninspired interior decor, as well as the complicated procedure to get the rear-seat entertainment up and running. After some practice over time, though, I'm sure operation would be easy enough. And in the long run, I'd be happier driving Honda's minivan.

Trying to make heads or tails of the exhaustive list of features on these two minivans is like trying to corral a herd of kittens. Below, we've listed those features (standard, optional or not available) that best account for the $4,300 price chasm between the 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite and the 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE (with the XLE Premium option package).

As usual, we did not include items that were standard on both minivans, as these features would neither affect the score nor reveal differentiation in equipment or price. For example, both the Odyssey and Sienna arrived with power moonroofs, power-sliding side doors, rear liftgates, window sunshades in the second and third rows and triple-zone climate control, so none of these items are included here.

To make matters even more difficult, Honda is historically a difficult case when it comes to model/style/trim classification, because there are technically no options available. Each "style" is its own model. However, on the 2011 Honda Odyssey, there are several features that are only available on the top-dog Touring and Touring Elite models. Because of this, if a feature we selected — such as the six-speed automatic transmission — was not available on all Odyssey models, it was scored as optional.

Features
  2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE
650-watt 5.1 Surround audio O N/A
Auto on/off headlamps O O*
Blind-spot warning system O N/A
Driver knee airbag N/A S
Front and rear parking sensors O O*
Hard-drive-based navigation and audio systems O N/A
High-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) port O N/A
Intelligent Key N/A O
Power-adjustable front passenger seat O N/A
Refrigerated storage O N/A
Six-speed automatic transmission O S
Telematics services N/A O
Two-position memory for driver seat O O*
Xenon headlamps O O*


Key:
S: Standard
O: Optional (and present)
O*: Optional (but absent)
N/A: Not Available


650-watt 5.1 Surround audio: This is a truly outstanding audio system typically offered on high-end luxury cars/SUVs; available only on the 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite (therefore "optional"). High-end audio is not available on the 2011 Toyota Sienna.

Auto on/off headlamps: Self-explanatory, and while auto-off headlamps are standard across the board for all 2011 Siennas and Odysseys, auto on/off are only available on specific models of both. They're present on the Odyssey Touring Elite but absent on the Sienna XLE.

Blind-spot warning system: Once a bit of a novelty, these ever-vigilant systems are gaining popularity and widespread application. Monitors use either video cameras or short-range sonar to detect vehicles (and motorcycles) in the space beside/behind yours. This feature is available only on the 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite (therefore "optional"); it's not available on the 2011 Toyota Sienna.

Driver knee airbag: This worthy safety item is standard on all 2011 Toyota Siennas (even the four-cylinder version), but not available on the 2011 Honda Odyssey.

Front and rear parking sensors: While rear parking sensors are included in the Sienna's XLE Premium package, front and rear sensors are available only on the 2011 Toyota Sienna Limited trim level (therefore absent). Sonar is available only on the 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite (therefore "optional").

Hard-drive-based navigation and audio systems: Once you've used a hard-drive based system, you'll think everything else is an antique. Available on the 2011 Honda Odyssey, EX-L, Touring and Touring Elite, these systems also afford up to 15GB of music storage. A hard drive is not available on the 2011 Toyota Sienna.

High-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) port: According to the HDMI Web site, "HDMI is the first industry-supported, uncompressed, all-digital audio/video interface." HDMI provides over a single cable an interface between any audio/video source, such as a laptop computer, game console or DVD player and an audio and/or video monitor, such as the ultra-wide screen in the Odyssey. It's available only on the Touring Elite trim of the 2011 Odyssey (therefore "optional"). It's not available at all on the 2011 Toyota Sienna.

Intelligent Key: BMW calls it Comfort Access, Mercedes-Benz calls it Keyless Go and Toyota calls it Smart Key System, but Honda doesn't offer it at all on the 2011 Odyssey. Whatever you call it, from the linty depths of your pocket or purse, these intelligent keys communicate with the car to allow you to unlock/lock and even start the car without the uncomfortable excavation ritual. This feature is part of the Sienna's XLE Premium package.

Power-adjustable front passenger seat: This key comfort feature is available only on the 2011 Honda Odyssey EX-L, Touring and Touring Elite (therefore "optional"). It's not available on any 2011 Toyota Sienna.

Refrigerated storage: While it might not be a true refrigerator (like in the Ford Flex), Honda calls it a "Cool Box" and it's a bin at the base of the center stack that's bathed in cool air from the air-conditioning system. It's available only on the 2011 Honda Odyssey EX-L, Touring and Touring Elite (therefore "optional") and not available at all on the 2011 Toyota Sienna.

Six-speed automatic transmission: Not just a bragging right any longer, a six-speed automatic transmission also provides incremental fuel savings. It's standard on all 2011 Toyota Siennas (even the four-cylinder version). However, on the 2011 Odyssey, it's available only on the Touring and Touring Elite models, so we count it as "optional."

Telematics services: General Motors calls it OnStar, Mercedes-Benz calls it TeleAid and Toyota calls it Safety Connect. Among other things, these systems automatically alert authorities if there's been a significant collision and in Toyota's case, it offers an emergency SOS button, roadside assistance, stolen vehicle location and remote door unlocking; free 1-year trial subscription on the 2011 Toyota Sienna ($140/year thereafter). Telematics service is not available on the 2011 Honda Odyssey.

Two-position memory for driver seat: This one's for Mom and Dad. It's available only on the 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite (therefore "optional") and available only on the Limited trim of the 2011 Toyota Sienna (absent here).

Xenon headlamps: Continuous short-arc, high-pressure xenon arc lamps have a color temperature closely approximating noon-time sunlight and are used in, among other things, automotive HID headlamps. They're available only on the Touring Elite version of the 2011 Honda Odyssey (therefore "optional"), and available as an option only on the Limited trim of the 2011 Toyota Sienna — thus absent on this XLE model.

Dimensions
Engine & Transmission Specifications
Warranty Information
Performance Information


Dimensions

Exterior Dimensions & Capacities
  2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE
Length, in. 202.9 200.2
Width, in. 79.2 78.1
Height, in. 68.4 70.7
Wheelbase, in. 118.1 119.3
As Tested Curb Weight, lb. 4,540 4,481
Turning Circle, ft. 36.7 36.9


Interior Dimensions
  2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE
Front headroom, in. 38.3 39.1
Rear headroom, in. 39.4 38.0
3rd row headroom, in. 38.0 35.9
Front shoulder room, in. 64.4 65.0
Middle shoulder room, in. 63.5 64.6
Rear shoulder room, in. 60.9 61.1
Front legroom, in. 40.9 40.5
Middle legroom, in. 40.9 37.6
Rear legroom, in. 42.4 36.3
Cargo volume behind 3rd row, cu-ft. 38.4 39.1
Cargo volume behind 2nd row, cu-ft. 93.1 87.1
Max cargo volume, cu-ft. 148.5 150.0
Cargo loading height, in. 25.0 23.9


Engine & Transmission Specifications
Engine & Transmission
  2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE
Displacement
(cc / cu-in):
3500 (214) 3500 (214)
Engine Type Naturally aspirated V6 Naturally aspirated V6
Horsepower (SAE) @ rpm 248 @ 5,700 266 @ 6,200
Max. Torque, lb-ft @ rpm 250 @ 4,800 245 @ 4,700
Transmission Six-speed auto Six-speed auto
EPA Fuel Economy City, mpg 19.0 18.0
EPA Fuel Economy Hwy, mpg 28.0 24.0
Observed Fuel Economy combined, mpg 18.0 17.0


Warranty
Warranty Information
  2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE
Basic Warranty 3 years/36,000 miles 3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain 5 years/60,000 miles 5 years/60,000 miles
Roadside Assistance Separate contract 2 years/25,000 miles
Corrosion Protection 5 years/Unlimited miles 5 years/Unlimited miles


Performance
Performance Information
  2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE
0-60 mph acceleration, sec. 8.1 8.0
Quarter-mile acceleration, sec. 15.9 15.9
Quarter-mile speed, mph 88.3 89.6
60-0-mph braking, feet 129 124
Lateral Acceleration, g 0.75 0.72
600-ft slalom, mph 59.3 57.9

Final Rankings
Item Weight 2011 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE
Personal Rating 2.5% 100.0 50.0
Recommended Rating 2.5% 100.0 50.0
Evaluation Score 20% 77.9 75.5
Feature Content 20% 52.4 33.3
Performance 15% 96.4 96.7
Fuel Consumption 20% 100.0 88.6
Price 20% 89.2 100.0
Total Score 100.0% 83.4 76.5
Final Ranking 1 2


We tweaked the knobs on this comparison only slightly to de-emphasize the two vehicles' track performances in favor of putting more weight behind Features and Price categories. And, to ensure that Features were offset by the Price (of those features), we assigned equal weight to both. Our 28-point evaluation scores were tabulated and given a somewhat significant 20 percent weight as "how" these two rivals execute their complex packages is at least as important as "what" was there to evaluate. Finally, fuel consumption is on everybody's mind, so it, too, earns a 20 percent weight.

Personal Rating (2.5%): Purely subjective; after the test, each participating editor was asked to rank the vehicles in order of preference based on which he or she would buy himself/herself if money were no object.

Recommended Rating (2.5%): After the test, each participating editor was asked to rank the vehicles in order of preference based on which he or she thought would be best for the average consumer shopping in this segment.

28-Point Evaluation (20%): Each participating editor ranked the vehicles based on a comprehensive 28-point evaluation. The evaluation covered everything from ride comfort, steering response and brake performance, to cupholders and exterior design. Scoring was calculated on a point system, and the scores listed are averages based on all test participants' evaluations.

Feature Content (20%): For this category, the editors picked the top 14 features they thought would be most beneficial to the consumer shopping in this segment. For each vehicle, the score was based on the number of actual features it had versus the total possible (10). Standard and optional equipment were taken into consideration. (We've weighted this category the same as Price to balance "what you get" versus "how much you pay for it.")

Performance Testing (15%): Both vans were subjected to a comprehensive battery of instrumented tests, including 0-60 acceleration, quarter-mile runs and panic stops from 60 mph. Each was run through a 600-foot slalom course to test transitional handling and around a skid pad to determine ultimate grip. For all track tests, we recorded data with stability/traction control systems in both "on" and "off" conditions (or as "off" as they allow). For this minivan test, we chose to use the default "on" results for the basis of comparison as a real-world assessment rather than an "at-the-limit" judgment. The vehicles were awarded points based on how closely each came to the better-performing vehicle's score in each category.

Fuel Consumption (20%): The numbers listed were the result of a simple percentage calculation based on the EPA's "combined" fuel economy estimates for the vehicles in the comparison test. Assigning 100 to the most fuel-efficient vehicle, the less efficient vehicle received a resulting percentage value.

Price (20%): The numbers listed were the result of a simple percentage calculation based on the least expensive vehicle in the comparison test. Using the "as tested" prices of the actual evaluation vehicles, the less expensive vehicle received a score of 100, with the remaining vehicle receiving a lesser score based on how much it cost. (This category is weighted the same as Feature Content to balance "what you get" versus "how much you pay for it.")

Vehicle
Model year2011
MakeHonda
ModelOdyssey
StyleTouring Elite (3.5L 6cyl 6A)
Vehicle TypeFWD 4dr 8-passenger Minivan
Base MSRP$44,030
Options on test vehiclePolished Metal Metallic
As-tested MSRP$44,030
Assembly locationLincoln, Alabama
North American parts content (%)75
Drivetrain
ConfigurationTransverse, front-engine, front-wheel drive
Engine typeNaturally aspirated port-injected V6, gasoline with cylinder deactivation
Displacement (cc/cu-in)3,471cc (212 cu-in)
Block/head materialAluminum/aluminum
ValvetrainSOHC, four valves per cylinder, variable intake + exhaust-valve timing and lift
Compression ratio (x:1)10.5
Redline, indicated (rpm)6,250
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)248 @ 5,700
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)250 @ 4,800
Fuel type87 octane acceptable + 91 octane for best performance or towing
Transmission typeSix-speed automatic with console shifter (shifter-mounted D4 button)
Transmission ratios (x:1)1st = 3.359; 2nd = 2.095; 3rd = 1.485; 4th = 1.065; 5th = 0.754; 6th = 0.556; R = 2.269
Final-drive ratio (x:1)4.25
Chassis
Suspension, frontIndependent MacPherson struts, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Suspension, rearIndependent multilink, coil springs
Steering typeHydraulic-assist speed-proportional rack-and-pinion power steering
Steering ratio (x:1)16.4
Tire make and modelMichelin Primacy MXV4
Tire typeAll-season (35 psi cold front; 35 psi cold rear)
Tire sizeP235/60R18 102T
Wheel size18-by-7 inches front and rear
Wheel materialCast aluminum
Brakes, front12.6-inch one-piece ventilated cast-iron discs with two-piston sliding calipers
Brakes, rear13.1-inch one-piece solid cast-iron discs with single-piston sliding calipers
Track Test Results
Acceleration, 0-30 mph (sec.)3.0
0-45 mph (sec.)5.2
0-60 mph (sec.)7.9
0-75 mph (sec.)11.4
1/4-mile (sec. @ mph)15.8 @ 88.4
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)7.5
0-30 mph, trac ON (sec.)3.2
0-45 mph, trac ON (sec.)5.4
0-60 mph, trac ON (sec.)8.1
0-75 mph, trac ON (sec.)11.6
1/4-mile, trac ON (sec. @ mph)15.9 @ 88.3
0-60, trac ON with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)7.7
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)33
60-0 mph (ft.)129
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph)60.6
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON59.3
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)0.77
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON0.75
Sound level @ idle (dB)37.4
@ Full throttle (dB)71.8
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)68.8
Engine speed @ 70 mph (rpm)2,000
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsIn spite of the true-defeat button for traction control, I couldn't manage to get any wheelspin, especially if I overlapped gas/brake application. Linear acceleration up to about 4,000 rpm where there's a slight VTEC camminess that's mostly heard rather than felt. Every upshift occurred at redline.
Braking commentsModerately firm pedal from first through fifth (final) stop from 60. Moderate dive, quiet ABS, good fade resistance. Did I just write that about a Honda? Obviously, reengineering the brakes was part of the new redesign.
Handling commentsSlalom: Still feels more athletic than the tires will allow, and it certainly feels more nimble than a minivan should. Steering reaction is direct and the Odyssey's ability to rotate slightly quells understeer. It can be "over-driven" with ESC off, but with ESC on, it's safe as houses. Skid pad: Crazy, howling tires all the way around the circle with ESC off. Steering feels natural and weighted appropriately. With ESC on, there are slight throttle and brake corrections.
Testing Conditions
Test date9/21/2010
Test locationCalifornia Speedway
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)70.4
Relative humidity (%)61.7
Barometric pressure (in. Hg)28.7
Wind (mph, direction)2.25 headwind
Odometer (mi.)1,630
Fuel used for test91 octane gasoline
As-tested tire pressures, f/r (psi)35/35
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)19 city/28 highway/22 combined
Edmunds observed (mpg)13 worst/19 best/18 average (over 422 miles)
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)21.0
Driving range (mi.)588
Audio and Advanced Technology
Stereo description650-watt AM/FM/CD hard disk drive-based 15GB (HDD) premium audio system with 12 speakers including subwoofer and 5.1 surround sound theater mode, and active noise cancellation
iPod/digital media compatibilityOptional iPod via USB jack
Satellite radioOptional XM
Hard-drive music storage capacity (Gb)Optional 15GB music storage capacity
Rear seat video and entertainmentOptional DVD player RCA/HDMI inputs
Bluetooth phone connectivityOptional phone and streaming audio
Navigation systemOptional hard drive with FM traffic 8-inch display screen (measured diagonally)
Telematics (OnStar, etc.)Not available
Smart entry/StartNot available
Parking aidsOptional parking sonar front and rear, back-up camera
Blind-spot detectionOptional
Adaptive cruise controlNot available
Lane-departure monitoringNot available
Collision warning/avoidanceNot available
Night VisionNot available
Driver coaching displayStandard
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)4,560
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)4,540
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)56/44
Length (in.)202.9
Width (in.)79.2
Height (in.)68.4
Wheelbase (in.)118.1
Track, front (in.)68.1
Track, rear (in.)68.2
Turning circle (ft.)36.7
Legroom, front (in.)40.9
Legroom, rear (in.)40.9
Legroom, 3rd row (in.)42.4
Headroom, front (in.)38.3
Headroom, rear (in.)39.4
Headroom, 3rd row (in.)38.0
Shoulder room, front (in.)64.4
Shoulder room, rear (in.)63.5
Shoulder room, 3rd row (in.)60.9
Seating capacity8
Step-in height, measured (in.)15.4
Max cargo volume behind 1st row (cu-ft)148.5
behind 2nd row (cu-ft)93.1
behind 3rd row (cu-ft)38.4
Cargo loading height, measured (in.)25.0
GVWR (lbs.)6,019
Payload, mfr. max claim (lbs.)1,340
Tow capacity, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,500
Tow capacity, as equipped (lbs.)3,500
Ground clearance (in.)6.0
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/60,000 miles
Corrosion5 years/Unlimited miles
Roadside assistanceAvailable through Honda Care contract
Free scheduled maintenanceNot available
Vehicle
Model year2011
MakeToyota
ModelSienna
StyleXLE (3.5L 6cyl 6A)
Vehicle TypeFWD 4dr 8-passenger Minivan
Base MSRP$33,185
Options on test vehicleMystic Teal Mica , XLE Premium Package ($6,225 -- includes dual-view entertainment center with two wireless headphones, voice-activated touchscreen DVD navigation system, panorama camera including integrated back-up camera with regular and wide angle views and on-screen back-up guides, JBL AM/FM/MP3 four-disc CD changer with 10 speakers, XM Radio with XM NavTraffic and no-cost 90-day trial subscription; auxiliary audio jack, USB port with iPod connectivity, hands-free phone capability and music streaming via Bluetooth wireless technology, Smart key system on all doors with push-button start and remote illuminated entry, chrome-accented outside door handles, rear parking sonar, Safety Connect with 1-year trial subscription); CF Carpet Floor Mats/Doorsill Protector ($324).
As-tested MSRP$39,734
Assembly locationPrinceton, Indiana
North American parts content (%)75
Drivetrain
ConfigurationTransverse, front-engine, front-wheel drive
Engine typeNaturally aspirated port-injected V6, gasoline
Displacement (cc/cu-in)3,456cc (211 cu-in)
Block/head materialAluminum/aluminum
ValvetrainDOHC, four valves per cylinder, variable intake + exhaust-valve timing and lift
Compression ratio (x:1)10.8
Redline, indicated (rpm)6,500
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)266 @ 6,200
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)245 @ 4,700
Fuel type87-octane acceptable + 91-octane for best performance/towing
Transmission typeSix-speed automatic with console shifter with Drive/Sport/Manual modes
Transmission ratios (x:1)1st = 3.300; 2nd = 1.900; 3rd = 1.420; 4th = 1.000; 5th = 0.713; 6th = 0.608; R = 4.148
Final-drive ratio (x:1)3.935
Chassis
Suspension, frontIndependent MacPherson struts, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Suspension, rearIndependent twist-beam axle, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Steering typeElectric-assist, speed-proportional rack-and-pinion power steering
Steering ratio (x:1)15.5
Tire make and modelMichelin Primacy MXV4
Tire typeAll-season (35 psi cold front; 35 psi cold rear)
Tire sizeP235/60R17 100T
Wheel size17-by-6.5 inches
Wheel materialCast aluminum
Brakes, front12.9-inch one-piece ventilated cast-iron discs with two-piston sliding calipers
Brakes, rear12.2-inch one-piece solid cast-iron discs with single-piston sliding calipers
Track Test Results
Acceleration, 0-30 mph (sec.)3.0
0-45 mph (sec.)5.0
0-60 mph (sec.)7.7
0-75 mph (sec.)11.1
1/4-mile (sec. @ mph)15.6 @ 90.9
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)7.4
0-30 mph, trac ON (sec.)3.2
0-45 mph, trac ON (sec.)5.4
0-60 mph, trac ON (sec.)8.0
0-75 mph, trac ON (sec.)11.6
1/4-mile, trac ON (sec. @ mph)15.9 @ 89.6
0-60, trac ON with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)7.7
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)31
60-0 mph (ft.)124
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph)58.6
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON57.9
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)0.72
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON0.72
Sound level @ idle (dB)41.1
@ Full throttle (dB)71.6
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)66.0
Engine speed @ 70 mph (rpm)2,000
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsWith traction control disabled (reengages at about 34 mph) managing wheelspin was the trick to a good run. Upshifts in Sport mode were shy of redline (lazy tach?), but quite smooth. Plenty of power for a 90-mph trap. No sense in manual shifting due to request/gearchange delay.
Braking commentsModerately firm pedal and good fade resistance but the ABS and EBD were a little noisy sorting out available grip. Some dive and wander, but still an average performance.
Handling commentsSlalom: Non-defeat stability control system gets angry between cones 2 and 3 when the rapid transitions start to pile on. Avoiding ESC intrusion (it is significantly punishing) means smooth steering input and no midcourse corrections for each cone at a sublimit speed. Do any or all of those things wrong and the anchor is deployed and the run is junked. Steering is precise but light and numb. Skid pad: Non-defeat ESC still allows some tire howl before closing the throttle or (later) dabbing brakes. Steering weight is appropriate, but it doesn't transmit info on tires or remaining grip.
Testing Conditions
Test date9/21/2010
Test locationCalifornia Speedway
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)63.4
Relative humidity (%)76.9
Barometric pressure (in. Hg)28.7
Wind (mph, direction)2.1 headwind
Odometer (mi.)10,369
Fuel used for test91 octane gasoline
As-tested tire pressures, f/r (psi)35/35
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)18 city/24 highway/20 combined
Edmunds observed (mpg)15 worst/20 best/17 average (over 645 miles)
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)20.0
Driving range (mi.)480
Audio and Advanced Technology
Stereo descriptionJBL AM/FM/MP3 four-disc CD changer with 10 speakers; XM Radio with XM NavTraffic and no-cost 90-day trial subscription; Auxiliary audio jack; USB port with iPod connectivity
iPod/digital media compatibilityOptional iPod via USB jack
Satellite radioOptional XM
Hard-drive music storage capacity (Gb)Not available
Rear seat video and entertainmentOptional DVD player RCA inputs
Bluetooth phone connectivityOptional phone and streaming audio
Navigation systemOptional DVD with traffic 7-inch display screen (measured diagonally)
Telematics (OnStar, etc.)Optional 12 months trial subscription
Smart entry/StartOptional ignition doors trunk/hatch
Parking aidsOptional rear parking sonar rear back-up camera
Blind-spot detectionNot available
Adaptive cruise controlOptional
Lane-departure monitoringNot available
Collision warning/avoidanceOptional
Night VisionNot available
Driver coaching displayStandard
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)4,490
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)4,481
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)56/44
Length (in.)200.2
Width (in.)78.1
Height (in.)70.7
Wheelbase (in.)119.3
Track, front (in.)67.7
Track, rear (in.)67.7
Turning circle (ft.)36.9
Legroom, front (in.)40.5
Legroom, rear (in.)37.6
Legroom, 3rd row (in.)36.3
Headroom, front (in.)39.1
Headroom, rear (in.)38.0
Headroom, 3rd row (in.)35.9
Shoulder room, front (in.)65.0
Shoulder room, rear (in.)64.6
Shoulder room, 3rd row (in.)61.1
Seating capacity8
Step-in height, measured (in.)16.8
Max cargo volume behind 1st row (cu-ft)150.0
behind 2nd row (cu-ft)87.1
behind 3rd row (cu-ft)39.1
Cargo loading height, measured (in.)23.9
GVWR (lbs.)5,995
Payload, mfr. max claim (lbs.)1,390
Tow capacity, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,500
Tow capacity, as equipped (lbs.)3,500
Ground clearance (in.)6.5
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/60,000 miles
Corrosion5 years/Unlimited miles
Roadside assistance2 years/25,000 miles
Free scheduled maintenance2 years/25,000 miles
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The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2011 Honda Odyssey in VA is:

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