TESTED: 2021 Dodge Durango SRT Hellcat vs. Other Hellcats

TESTED: 2021 Dodge Durango SRT Hellcat vs. Other Hellcats

How does SRT's latest SUV compare to other Hellcat-powered models?

  • The nutty Hellcat V8 has ended up under the hood of a wide range of vehicles, including the Dodge Durango SUV
  • Edmunds has tested a variety of these Hellcat-powered models over the years, so we've got a lot of Hellcat track numbers in the vault
  • How does the Durango SRT Hellcat stack up against some other recent Hellcat-powered models? Let's find out

Since 2015, Stellantis — formerly Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) — has been kind enough to supply a steady stream of vehicles powered by the supercharged Hellcat V8 engine, which initially made 707 horsepower and 650 lb-ft of torque but has since produced varying outputs depending on the application. The two obvious starting points were the Dodge Charger and Dodge Challenger with their classic muscle car look and feel, but from there, the Hellcat V8 has made its way into the Jeep Grand Cherokee and even the Ram 1500 pickup truck. Not to be outdone, the Dodge Durango SUV got the SRT Hellcat treatment recently, and in our instrumented testing we clocked it at a scarcely believable 3.9 seconds from zero to 60 mph.

You might not think the family-hauling Durango SRT Hellcat has a chance against its sportier brethren, but keep in mind that it comes standard with all-wheel drive, which is handy when you're trying to put more than 700 horsepower to the pavement. Could it be that the Durango isn't the slowest Hellcat? Let's take a look at the numbers.

How do the Hellcats stack up?

Note that this isn't a full list of every Hellcat-powered model — just the four most recent models that Edmunds has tested. As you'll see, the answer to our Durango question is that it is not, in fact, the slowest Hellcat, at least if you're talking zero to 60.

Dodge Durango SRT Hellcat

  • Powertrain
    • 6.2-liter supercharged V8 (710 hp, 645 lb-ft)
    • Eight-speed automatic transmission
    • All-wheel drive
  • Performance
    • 0-60 mph: 3.9 seconds
    • Quarter-mile: 12.1 seconds @ 113.1 mph
    • 60-0 mph braking: 111 feet
    • Skidpad: 0.91 g

Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk

  • Powertrain
    • 6.2-liter supercharged V8 (707 hp, 645 lb-ft)
    • Eight-speed automatic transmission
    • All-wheel drive
  • Performance
    • 0-60 mph: 3.7 seconds
    • Quarter-mile: 11.8 seconds @ 114.5 mph
    • 60-0 mph braking: 109 feet
    • Skidpad: 0.91 g

Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat

  • Powertrain
    • 6.2-liter supercharged V8 (707 hp, 650 lb-ft)
    • Eight-speed automatic transmission
    • Rear-wheel drive
  • Performance
    • 0-60 mph: 4.1 seconds
    • Quarter-mile: 11.9 seconds @ 123.0 mph
    • 60-0 mph braking: 104 feet
    • Skidpad: 0.96 g

Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye

  • Powertrain
    • 6.2-liter supercharged V8 (797 hp, 707 lb-ft)
    • Eight-speed automatic transmission
    • Rear-wheel drive
  • Performance
    • 0-60 mph: 4.2 seconds
    • Quarter-mile: 11.7 seconds @ 127.0 mph
    • 60-0 mph braking: 102 feet
    • Skidpad: 1.0 g

If you're wondering how the less powerful Grand Cherokee Trackhawk and Durango Hellcat outran the Charger and Challenger to 60 mph, it all comes down to traction. The traditional cars in this group struggle with traction, but these SUVs have the benefit of all-wheel drive off the line. Take a look at the quarter-mile runs, though, and you'll see that the Charger and Challenger leave the Durango and Grand Cherokee in the dust. 

Edmunds says

We're rarely going to complain about more power, especially when it leads to something as silly and as fun as these four vehicles. Now, who do we have to call about getting a Chrysler Pacifica with a Hellcat V8?


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