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Used Chevrolet Camaro For Sale

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2017 Chevrolet Camaro
27 photos

List price: $59,432

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2017 ZL1 Supercharged Camaro ! Krypton Green. Manual transmission, Data recorder, Moonroof. Best of the best. Over 600 hp! 800 miles. Previous customer paid $69,0000. RARE LIKE NEW! Certified. Navigation, Rear Back Up Camera, Bluetooth, Local Trade, Bose Audio, Air Conditioning, AM/FM radio, Bose Premium 9-Speaker Audio System Feature, Memory seat, Navigation System, Power windows, Remote keyless entry, SiriusXM Satellite Radio, Speed control. Clean CARFAX. Odometer is 4930 miles below market average! Chevrolet Certified Pre-Owned Details: * 24 months/24,000 miles (whichever comes first) CPO Scheduled Maintenance Plan and 3 days/150 miles (whichever comes first) Vehicle Exchange Program * Transferable Warranty * Warranty Deductible: $0 * Limited Warranty: 12 Month/12,000 Mile (whichever comes first) from certified purchase date * 172 Point Inspection * Roadside Assistance * Powertrain Limited Warranty: 72 Month/100,000 Mile (whichever comes first) from original in-service date * Vehicle History Krypton Green 2017 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 RWD 6.2L V8 Supercharged Awards: * Car and Driver 10 Best Cars Car and Driver, January 2017. Here at Dave White Chevrolet we take your interest in our vehicles very seriously. That is why we use state of the art pricing tools to ensure we are the most competitively priced vehicles in the market. Our pricing is automatically checked 60 times a day and spans more then 300 miles in our market to ensure you are getting a great deal on your next vehicle. Our internet department is here to do that for you. Call for availability 419-304-9500 or just fill out the form on this page for a quick response on the vehicle you are interested in. You can also visit our website at www.davewhitechevy.com. The White Family dealers started in 1914 with Hugh White's first Chevrolet store in Zanesville, OH. In 1960, they opened Suburban Chevrolet in Sylvania, (Toledo) Ohio. Today our family of dealerships includes Dave White Chevrolet, Dave White Acura, Jim White Toyota, Lexus of Toledo, Dave White Auto Credit and Universal Auto Credit. From 1914 until now, the White Family has kept a tradition of service, a commitment to the community, and an eye on the future. A business that thinks in terms of today & tomorrow, it tells you that long after the sale is made we'll be right here, ready to help you in any way we can. If you are a customer that has already experienced The Dave White Chevrolet Difference, welcome back! If you are new to Dave White Chevrolet, we sincerely hope that your visit to our website is the start of a long term automotive relationship. Thank you for giving us the opportunity to serve your needs online 24 hours a day / 7 days a week.


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2017 Chevrolet Camaro
36 photos

List price: $61,999

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Visit Don's Automotive Group 6902 Johnston Street Lafayette LA 70503 or online at www.donswholesalela.com to see more pictures of this vehicle or call us at 337-983-0705 today to schedule your test drive.Vehicle Disclaimer: Vehicle Options may vary please call or schedule a test drive for full vehicle information.


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2012 Chevrolet Camaro
22 photos

List price: $19,995

Buy with confidence! This vehicle's story can be verified with an AutoCheck Vehicle History Report. Columbia Chevrolet is proud to present this clean pre-owned vehicle. Grab your keys and drive on down today. We have hundreds of sensational deals just like this one going on right now. More people choose Columbia Chevrolet over any other dealer in the area. Find us right now at 9750 Montgomery Rd in Cincinnati.


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2015 Chevrolet Camaro
17 photos

List price: $22,000

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*Heated leather seats, sunroof, and RS package.*Come see this 2015 Chevrolet Camaro LT. Its Automatic transmission and Gas V6 3.6L/217 engine will keep you going. This Chevrolet Camaro has the following options: Wipers, front intermittent, Windows, power with driver and passenger Express-Down/Up, Wheels, 19' (48.3 cm) painted aluminum, Visors, driver and front passenger vanity mirrors, covered, Universal Home Remote includes garage door opener, 3-channel programmable, Trunk release, remote, located on driver-side, Trunk emergency release handle, Tires, P245/50R19 touring, blackwall, all-season, Tire sealant and inflator kit in place of spare tire, and Tire Pressure Monitor System. Test drive this vehicle at Bob Poynter GM, 1209 E Tipton St, Seymour, IN 47274.


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2015 Chevrolet Camaro
17 photos

List price: $22,999

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*Heated leather seats, sunroof, navigation, Heads Up Display, and rear camera.*Come see this 2015 Chevrolet Camaro LT. Its Automatic transmission and Gas V6 3.6L/217 engine will keep you going. This Chevrolet Camaro features the following options: Wipers, front intermittent, Windows, power with driver and passenger Express-Down/Up, Wheels, 19' (48.3 cm) painted aluminum, Visors, driver and front passenger vanity mirrors, covered, Universal Home Remote includes garage door opener, 3-channel programmable, Trunk release, remote, located on driver-side, Trunk emergency release handle, Tires, P245/50R19 touring, blackwall, all-season, Tire sealant and inflator kit in place of spare tire, and Tire Pressure Monitor System. Test drive this vehicle at Bob Poynter GM, 1209 E Tipton St, Seymour, IN 47274.


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2015 Chevrolet Camaro
36 photos

List price: $22,190

Special Offer + Perks

Expires Dec 27, 2017.

2015 Chevrolet Camaro 2LT 2D Coupe Black RWD 3.6L V6 DGI DOHC VVT Odometer is 11071 miles below market average! New Price! CARFAX One-Owner.Easterns Automotive Group has sold used cars in the Maryland, DC, and Virginia communities for over 25 years and has sold over 100,000 certified used vehicles. Every Easterns vehicle has passed a rigorous Multi-Point Quality Certification and a 7-day return policy so you can buy with confidence.6-Speed Automatic with TapShift 19/30mpg 30/19 Highway/City MPG Awards: * JD Power Initial Quality StudyEasterns operates an open inventory and any of our cars can be transferred and purchased from any location. Easterns has six convenient used car dealerships around Washington DC, Maryland and Virginia. Search our vast inventory of over 1000 cars and remember at Easterns Your Job Is Your Credit.



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2014 Chevrolet Camaro
15 photos

List price: $28,486

Special Offer + Perks

Expires Dec 27, 2017.

Check out this 2014 Chevrolet Camaro SS. Its Manual transmission and Gas V8 6.2L/376 engine will keep you going. This Chevrolet Camaro comes equipped with these options: Wipers, front intermittent, Windows, power with driver and passenger Express-Down/Up, Wheels, 20 x 8 (50.8 cm x 20.3 cm) front and 20 x 9 (50.8 cm x 22.9 cm) rear flangeless, painted aluminum with Bright Silver finish (Midnight Silver finish when (WRS) RS Package is ordered.), Visors, driver and front passenger vanity mirrors, covered, Universal Home Remote includes garage door opener, 3-channel programmable, Trunk release, remote, located on driver-side, Trunk emergency release handle, Tires, P245/45R20 front and P275/40R20 rear, blackwall, summer (Do not use summer-only tires in winter conditions, as it would adversely affect vehicle safety, performance and durability.), Tire sealant and inflator kit in place of spare tire, and Tire pressure monitoring system. See it for yourself at Johnson Auto Plaza, 12410 East 136th Ave, Brighton, CO 80601.


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2014 Chevrolet Camaro
24 photos

List price: $17,550

Excellent Condition, CARFAX 1-Owner, ONLY 32,089 Miles! PRICE DROP FROM $17,981. Blue Ray Metallic exterior and Black interior. Alloy Wheels, Satellite Radio, AUDIO SYSTEM, AM/FM STEREO WITH CD PL, ENGINE, 3.6L SIDI DOHC V6 VVT, TRANSMISSION, 6-SPEED AUTOMATIC, Short Term Lease Rental PRICED TO MOVE Was $17,981. KEY FEATURES INCLUDE Satellite Radio. Onboard Communications System, Aluminum Wheels, Keyless Entry, Remote Trunk Release, Steering Wheel Controls. Short Term Lease Rental. OPTION PACKAGES AUDIO SYSTEM, AM/FM STEREO WITH CD PLAYER MP3 PLAYBACK music navigator, Graphic Information Display (GID) and auxiliary input jack, includes outside temperature display (STD), TRANSMISSION, 6-SPEED AUTOMATIC includes TAPshift manual shift controls on steering wheel (STD), ENGINE, 3.6L SIDI DOHC V6 VVT (323 hp [240.8 kW] @ 6800 rpm, 278 lb-ft of torque [375.3 N-m] @ 4800 rpm) (STD). Chevrolet LS with Blue Ray Metallic exterior and Black interior features a V6 Cylinder Engine with 323 HP at 6800 RPM*. EXPERTS REPORT Edmunds.com's review says 'Driven around turns, the Camaro grips hard and steers with precision.'. EXCELLENT SAFETY FOR YOUR FAMILY Electronic Stability Control, 4-Wheel ABS, Tire Pressure Monitoring System, 4-Wheel Disc Brakes OUR OFFERINGS All prices are plus tax, tag, title, a dealer pre-delivery service fee in the amount of $599 and an electronic filing fee of $98. Both charges represent costs and profit to the dealer for items such as inspecting, cleaning, and adjusting vehicles, and preparing documents related to the sale. Pricing analysis performed on 11/22/2017. Horsepower calculations based on trim engine configuration. Please confirm the accuracy of the included equipment by calling us prior to purchase.


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2012 Chevrolet Camaro
1 photo

List price: $24,783

EVERY ONE OF OUR VEHICLES GOES THROUGH A RIGOROUS 120 POINT INSPECTION BEFORE HITTING THE LOT... TO QUALIFY FOR THE SPECIAL INTERNET PRICE LISTED ABOVE ON THIS VEHICLE YOU MUST CALL JONICA PIRON DIRECTLY @ 877-659-7938 AND I WILL BE HAPPY TO ASSIST YOU. THANK YOU! NOTE:ALL VEHICLES SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR INADVERTENT INACCURIES,IF ANY, IN VEHICLE DESCRIPTIONS OR PRICING



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2015 Chevrolet Camaro
18 photos

List price: $16,700

Special Offer + Perks

Expires Dec 27, 2017.

*ONE OWNER* and *LOCAL TRADE*. 4-Wheel Antilock 4-Wheel Disc Brakes, 6 Speakers, 6-Speaker Audio System Feature, AM/FM radio: SiriusXM, Bluetooth For Phone, CD player, Delay-off headlights, Fully automatic headlights, MP3 decoder, Power driver seat, Radio data system, Radio: AM/FM Stereo w/CD/MP3 Playback Capability, Remote Keyless Entry, SiriusXM Satellite Radio, and Steering wheel mounted audio controls. You'll be hard pressed to find a better car than this good-looking 2015 Chevrolet Camaro. This outstanding Chevrolet is one of the most sought after used vehicles on the market because it NEVER lets owners down. Call us directly at (703) 777-0000 to confirm availability! Jerry's Leesburg Ford is located at 847 East Market Street, Leesburg, Virginia. If you have any questions, please contact us directly and we'll be glad to help! Our sales department is open 7 days a week: M-F 9AM-9PM, Sat 9AM-6PM, Sun 11AM-5PM. Jerry's Leesburg Ford is a full-service Ford Dealership. Ford Sales, Ford Finance, and Ford Service conveniently located in the town of Leesburg, Virginia.


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2012 Chevrolet Camaro
22 photos

List price: $33,998

20 Inch Plus Wheels,ABS Brakes,Adjustable Suspension,Air Conditioning,Alloy Wheels,AM/FM Stereo,Auxiliary Audio Input,Bluetooth,Boston Sound System,CD Audio,Cruise Control,Front Seat Heaters,Head Up Display,Leather & Suede Seats,OnStar Trial Available,Overhead Airbags,Parking Sensors,Power Locks,Power Mirrors,Power Seat(s),Power Windows,Rear Defroster,Rear Spoiler,Rear View Camera,Remote Start,Satellite Radio Ready,Side Airbags,SiriusXM Trial Avail,Supercharged Engine,Traction Control Price excludes tax, title, tags and $99 dealer service fee (not required by law). Some fees are location specific and may change if you transfer this vehicle to a different CarMax store. Prior Use: Personal Use



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2015 Chevrolet Camaro
29 photos

List price: $23,250

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Clean CARFAX. Black 2015 Chevrolet Camaro 2LT 2LT RWD 6-Speed Automatic with TapShift 3.6L V6 DGI DOHC VVT Camaro 2LT 2LT, 2D Coupe, 3.6L V6 DGI DOHC VVT, 6-Speed Automatic with TapShift, Black, Inferno Orange Leather, 2 Front Cup Holders, 3-Spoke Leather-Wrapped Steering Wheel, 4-Wheel Antilock 4-Wheel Disc Brakes, Analog Instrumentation, Auxiliary Multi-Function Gauges, Body-Color Roof Ditch Molding, Boston Acoustics Premium 9-Speaker Audio System, Carpeted Front Floor Mats, Color Display Driver Information Center, Electric Rear-Window Defogger, Electronic Cruise Control, Head-Up Display, Heated Driver & Front Passenger Seats, High-Intensity Discharge Headlamps, LATCH System, Leather-Wrapped Shift Knob, Maintenance-Free Battery, Manual Rake & Telescopic Steering Column, Navigation System, OnStar 6 Months Directions & Connections Plan, Power Programmable Door Locks, Preferred Equipment Group 2LT, Remote Keyless Entry, RS Package, Separate Daytime Running Lamps, SiriusXM Satellite Radio, StabiliTrak, Stainless-Steel Dual-Outlet Exhaust, Steering Wheel Mounted Audio Controls, Tire Sealant & Inflator Kit, Universal Home Remote, USB Port Audio System Feature.Odometer is 10437 miles below market average! 30/19 Highway/City MPGAwards: * JD Power Initial Quality StudyVisit our virtual showroom 24/7 @ www.stingraychevrolet.com.


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2015 Chevrolet Camaro
15 photos

List price: $23,615

Special Offer + Perks

Expires Dec 27, 2017.

Okay it's a 6. Cylinder, be honest with yourself your looking at this 2015 Chevrolet Camaro with a 6-Speed simply because of the styling. You and only you will know just how much your saving on gas and insurance premiums.Equipped with plenty of options like20 x 9Aluminum Wheels, 3-Spoke Leather-Wrapped Steering Wheel, 4-Wheel Antilock 4-Wheel Disc Brakes the performance will impress you. Interior options include Boston Acoustics Premium 9-Speaker Audio System, Carpeted Front Floor Mats, Color Display Driver Information Center, Electric Rear-Window Defogger, Electronic Cruise Control, Head-Up Display, Heated Driver & Front Passenger Seats.This can be yours come see an incredible Camara todayOne-Owner. Clean CARFAX.


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2015 Chevrolet Camaro
19 photos

List price: $18,998

20 Inch Plus Wheels,ABS Brakes,Air Conditioning,Alloy Wheels,AM/FM Stereo,Auxiliary Audio Input,Bluetooth,CD Audio,Cloth Seats,Cruise Control,Manual Transmission,OnStar Trial Available,Overhead Airbags,Power Locks,Power Mirrors,Power Windows,Rear Defroster,Satellite Radio Ready,Side Airbags,SiriusXM Trial Avail,Traction Control Price excludes tax, title and tags, and $150 documentary fee (not required by law). Some fees are location specific and may change if you transfer this vehicle to a different CarMax store. Prior Use: Fleet


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2012 Chevrolet Camaro
36 photos

List price: $26,995

**45TH ANNIVERSARY** 1 OWNER** ONLY 4300 MILES!!!** HEADS UP DISPLAY* BACK UP CAMERA* LEATHER* SUNROOF* BLUETOOTH* PADDLE SHIFT* BOSTON PREMIUM AUDIO* AUX/USB* SATELLITE READY* ONSTAR* POWER SEATS* ALLOY WHEELS* RACING STRIPES* REAR SPOILER* PARKING SENSORS* FOG LIGHTS* DUAL EXAUST.......POWERED BY A 6.2L 8 CYL ENGINE!!!!.......Why buy from Highline Car Connection.....We have been in business SINCE 1988. Veteran Owned & Operated. We have ASE Certified Master Technicians on site. Every vehicle goes through a thorough safety inspection. Feel free to have any one of our vehicles inspected by a mechanic of your choice before you purchase! And we do have financing for ALL credit tiers! Call our sales department today 203 573 0884.......HCCAUTOS.COM


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2013 Chevrolet Camaro
20 photos

List price: $15,599

CarMax makes car buying easy and hassle-free. Our upfront prices are the same online and on our lot. All our used cars come with free vehicle history and safety recall reports (certain vehicles may have unrepaired safety recalls-check nhtsa.gov/recalls to learn if this vehicle has an unrepaired safety recall), plus a 5-Day Money-Back Guarantee, and a 30-Day Limited Warranty (60-Day in CT, MN, and RI; 90-Day in MA, NJ, and NY). Price excludes tax, title and tags. Some fees are location specific and may change if you transfer this vehicle to a different CarMax store. Prior Use: Demonstrator, Former Leased Car, Fleet



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2014 Chevrolet Camaro
20 photos

List price: $15,998

CarMax makes car buying easy and hassle-free. Our upfront prices are the same online and on our lot. All our used cars come with free vehicle history and safety recall reports (certain vehicles may have unrepaired safety recalls-check nhtsa.gov/recalls to learn if this vehicle has an unrepaired safety recall), plus a 5-Day Money-Back Guarantee, and a 30-Day Limited Warranty (60-Day in CT, MN, and RI; 90-Day in MA, NJ, and NY). Price excludes tax, title, tags and $299 documentary fee (not required by law). Some fees are location specific and may change if you transfer this vehicle to a different CarMax store. Prior Use: Fleet


page 1 of 1,224

Chevrolet Camaro History

Chevrolet's Camaro (and its sister "F-car," the Pontiac Firebird) was hardly an original notion — it was a blatant GM rip-off of the Ford Mustang. But just because it's stolen doesn't mean it's a bad idea.

Trivia to keep in mind: Every engine in every Camaro ever built by GM was of pushrod-actuated valve design. There's never been an overhead cam engine in a factory Camaro.

First Generation (1967-1970)

Just as the first Mustang was based on Ford's compact Falcon, so the first 1967 Camaro was based on Chevy's compact Nova. However, it was based on the upcoming redesigned '68 Nova and therefore more robust than a comparable '67 Nova.

The basic engineering of the Camaro was a unibody structure from the windshield and firewall back, with a separate steel rail subframe for everything up front. Double A-arms made up the independent front suspension while the solid rear axle was suspended by semi-elliptical leaf springs. As was typical of standard-equipped vehicles at the time, braking was by four drums, the steering was slow and manual, and Chevy's rugged 230-cubic-inch straight six poked out an optimistically rated 140 horsepower while twisting a three-speed manual transmission.

The base $2,466 '67 Camaro sport coupe was lean and aggressive, as was the convertible. Adding substance to that appearance was done either by picking or combining individual options or trim packages called RS and SS.

Buyers could opt for a larger 250-inch version of the six making 155 horsepower, a 210-horsepower 327-cubic-inch small-block V8 fed by a two-barrel carb, that same V8 with a four-barrel carb and a higher compression ratio was rated at 275 horsepower, or two versions of the 396-cubic-inch big-block V8 making either 325 or 375 horsepower. Those engines could be lashed to a series of wide- or short-ratio three- or four-speed manual transmissions, or one of two automatics: the slushy two-speed Powerglide or outstanding three-speed Turbobydramatic.

The Rally Sport (RS) appearance package brought deluxe interior trim and hidden headlights with it, and the high-performance Super Sport (SS) package had its own distinct decoration (including a domed hood with simulated vents, "bumble bee" stripes encircling the nose and the iconic SS badges), a heavy-duty suspension and larger D70-series tires on 14-inch wheels. Beyond that, the SS-350 model also offered a new 350-cubic-inch small-block V8 rated at 295 horsepower — Chevy's first 350. The Rally Sport and Super Sport packages could also be ordered together to form the most lavishly equipped Camaro of them all, the RS/SS. And it was an RS/SS convertible powered by a 396 that Chevy provided as pace car for the 1967 Indianapolis 500.

Almost outside the regular Camaro line was the race-oriented Z/28. Introduced in December 1966, the Z/28 was powered by a special high-compression 302-cubic-inch V8 whose displacement was achieved by matching the short-stroke crank of the 283-cubic-inch version with the big-bore block of the 327. Rated at 290 horsepower and built to rev, the radical powerplant was matched to a more aggressive suspension.

How did the first Camaro perform? Car Life magazine's test of an SS-350 had it completing the quarter-mile in 15.8 seconds at 89 mph while Motor Trend reported that its SS-350 did the same trick in 15.4 seconds at 90 mph.

Thanks to "Astro Ventilation," General Motors eliminated the side vent wing windows on the 1968 Camaro and also added federally mandated side marker lights and a revised base grille). Mechanically, the most significant change was the adoption of staggered rear shocks (one in front of the rear axle, one behind) to counteract wheel hop under hard acceleration.

While the 1969 Camaro's structure and mechanical elements were virtually unchanged from the '68 model, new fenders, door skins, rear quarter-panels, grille and taillights gave the car a wider, lower appearance. A redesigned dash and more comfortable seats made it more livable, too. But it was the staggering array of available performance equipment that marks 1969 as the greatest model year for Camaros.

On the yawn side, a new low-performance 200-horsepower 307-cubic-inch small-block (a 327 crank in a 283 block) supplemented the low-performance 327 and a new 255-horsepower 350 replaced the better-performing 327. On the yeow side, Chevy produced its second Camaro Indianapolis 500 pace car and offered replicas of the white RS/SS convertible with orange stripes and orange houndstooth upholstery to the public (the actual pace car was powered by a 396, but most of the replicas had 350s). In addition, two radical Camaros were produced in extremely limited numbers under special Central Office Production Orders (COPO) 9560 and 9561.

The COPO 9561 was a basic Camaro sport coupe stuffed with 427 cubic inches of all-iron big-block making 425 horsepower. Most of the 1,015 COPO 9561s were delivered to Pennsylvania's Yenko Chevrolet for conversion into that dealership's signature Camaro. Even rarer was the COPO 9560 featuring the legendary all-aluminum ZL-1 427 also rated at 425 horsepower. Only 69 of the ZL-1s were built, and because of their rarity, tremendous output and relatively low weight, they are today considered the quickest and most valuable Camaros ever built.

Sales of the 1969 models extended into the winter of 1969 and early 1970; some of these lingering '69s may have been titled as 1970 models, leading to some confusion.

Second Generation (1970½-1981)

Though it didn't make it to market until February of 1970, the second-generation 1970½ Camaro would be in production 12 years. The second-generation Camaro's styling was inspired by Ferrari and was also bigger, heavier and no longer available as a convertible. And as the 1970s progressed, it would grow less powerful, succumbing to the pressures of tightening emissions regulations and a fuel crisis.

Still based on the Nova, the new Camaro was engineered much like its predecessor in that it still used a unibody structure with a front subframe, leaf springs in the back and A-arms up front for suspension. Those A-arms were freshly designed and the steering gear moved from the back to the front of the front axle, but otherwise the basic mechanical pieces were familiar.

Also familiar were most of the engines. The 155-horsepower 250-cubic-inch six was now the Camaro's base engine, followed by the who-cares 200-horsepower 307, the lowliest of V8 offerings. A 250-horsepower two-barrel 350 effectively replaced the 327. Order the SS package and the 350 earned a four-barrel carb and additional compression to reach 300 horsepower. Moreover, SS buyers could pay even more and get a 350- or 375-horsepower 396 big-block V8.

As before, the Camaro was offered with Rally Sport or Super Sport equipment or both. The Rally Sport package featured a unique front-end appearance with a split front bumper and a center grille cavity encircled in rubber. The SS again had heavier-duty suspension and the "SS" logos.

The star 1970½ Camaro was again the Z/28, now powered by a 360-horsepower high-compression "LT-1" 350. Unlike the high-revving 302 used in the first Z/28s, the LT-1 was easy-going in everyday traffic, still revved with enthusiasm and was now available with an automatic transmission. Car and Driver's test had the '70½ Z/28 ripping to 60 mph in 5.8 seconds and running through the quarter-mile in 14.2 seconds at a full 100.3 mph, though the drivers still found it lacking in bottom-end power.

But the glory days of the LT-1 would last just that one year. With emissions regulations growing tougher, GM dropped compression ratios across the board for 1971 and also adopted "net" alongside "gross" power ratings for its engines (by '72, all engines were only net rated). For the 250-cubic inch inline six, the power rating dropped from 155-gross to 110-net horsepower. For the LT-1, the drop was a 30-horsepower plunge down to a 330 horsepower gross and 275 horsepower net. Otherwise, the '71 barely changed from the '70½ model; high-back bucket seats were new, and the rear spoiler on Z/28s was now a larger three-piece unit.

The 1972 Camaro changed mostly in the engine bay where the horsepower devastation continued. The LT-1 could now only poke out 255 horsepower (net) and the most robust big-block (still called a 396, but in reality a 402) was making just 240 net horsepower.

In 1973 the bumpers were slightly revised and the horsepower drain continued with the base six now making an utterly lame 100 net horsepower and the L82 only 245. The big-block was off the option sheet altogether. In place of the Super Sport was the "Type-LT" Camaro, which bundled a slew of luxury options into one cohesive package.

To meet new bumper regulations, the 1974 Camaro was redesigned with thick aluminum bumpers front and rear. The one-and-only grille (the Rally Sport option vanished) was now shovel-shaped and the rear taillights wrapped into the fenders. But there were no changes to the available engines and trim levels.

With unbelievable shortsightedness, Chevy killed the Z/28 and pared the engine selection down to just three catalyst-equipped lumps for 1975 — the 250-cubic-inch six now rated at 105 horsepower, a two-barrel 350 V8 making a pathetic 145 horsepower and a four-barrel version of the same engine rated at a meager 155 horsepower.

Distinguishing the '75 from '74 was a new rear window that wrapped down into the roof sail panels. Also new for '75 was a "Rally Sport" package that consisted of two-tone paint and some tape stripes.

For no apparent reason, the '75 Camaro sold well, so there were few changes to the 1976 model. An aluminum panel between the taillights was now used on the Type-LT, power brakes were finally standard and cruise control was a new option. The two-barrel 350 was killed in favor of an even-crummier two-barrel 305 producing 140 horsepower while the four-barrel 350 now whacked out a still-inexcusable 165 horsepower.

When the 1977 Camaro appeared, there were again few changes (intermittent wipers anyone?), but in the middle of the year, the Z/28 returned as a separate model whose concentration was now on handling and appearance. And the new Z/28 did handle well, even if it only had 170 horsepower aboard from the same 350 four-barrel V8 offered in other Camaros (up 5 horsepower from '76). The '77 Camaro was thoroughly lackluster, but with Ford foisting the hideous Mustang II upon America, for the first time, more Camaros (198,755) were sold than Mustangs (161,654).

Daring to mess (however lightly) with success, Chevrolet equipped the 1978 Camaro with a new nose that put the big bumpers under soft plastic. Five models were now offered (sport coupe, Rally Sport, Type-LT, Type-LT Rally Sport and Z/28), and translucent T-tops were a new option. The Z/28's full-disco body package (with front fender vents and a fake hoodscoop) was supported in '78 with a revised version of the 350 V8 now rated at a better-but-still-weak 185 horsepower.

Though almost a carryover from '78, the 1979 Camaro would prove the most popular one yet. The Type-LT vanished in favor of a new trim level called Berlinetta, but the engines were all unchanged, even though power ratings were rattled a bit in contending with emissions requirements (Z/28 output dropped to 175 horsepower for 49-state cars). The most substantial change to the '79 Camaro was a new instrument panel with more contemporary instrumentation and better control placement. Chevy sold a stunning 282,571 Camaros during the 1979 model year — a number it would never top.

Looking to improve fuel economy, Chevy mangled the Camaro's engine lineup for 1980 while leaving the rest of the car pretty much alone. A new 115-horsepower 229-cubic-inch V6 (basically a small-block V8 with a pair of cylinders hacked off) — or, in California, a 110-horsepower 231-cubic-inch V6 replaced the ancient inline six, and a new 267-cubic-inch two-barrel version of the small-block V8 debuted, rated at a laughable 120 horsepower. On the positive side, output of the Z/28's 350 grew to 190 horsepower, except in California where buyers got a 155-horsepower 305-cubic-inch V8 mated to a mandatory three-speed automatic. Caught in a fuel crisis, Camaro sales nose-dived to 152,005 during the 1980 model year.

The antiquated platform of the second-generation Camaro had run its course by the 1981 model year. With a new engine control computer aboard, all engines were now certified for all 50 states, but output on the Z/28's 350 dropped to 175 horsepower. The Rally Sport died (again) and the '81 Camaro lineup consisted of three well-defined models: base sport coupe, Berlinetta and Z/28. Those three model names would survive to see 1982, but not much else.

Third Generation (1982-1992)

Third-generation Camaros were the first built without front subframes or leaf-spring rear suspensions. Now the front end was held up with a modified MacPherson strut system, and the hind end relied on a long torque arm and coil springs. These were also the first Camaros with factory fuel injection, four-speed automatic transmissions, five-speed manual transmissions, four-cylinder engines, 16-inch wheels and hatchback bodies. In January 1982, the Camaro was, for the first time since 1967, truly all-new and slightly smaller.

But the 1982 engine selection was hardly scintillating. Base sport coupes started with a 90-horsepower version of GM's lethargic 2.5-liter "Iron Duke" four and could be optioned up to a 112-horse 2.8-liter V6 (base engine in the Berlinetta) or a four-barrel carbureted 5.0-liter (305-cubic-inch) small-block V8 rated at 145 horsepower. That V8 was the Z28's base powerplant; buyers could opt for a Z28 "Cross-Fire Injection" (throttle body-injected) version producing 165 horsepower. The carbureted V8 could be had with either a three-speed automatic or four-speed manual, but the injected engine was automatic only.

A Camaro paced the Indianapolis 500 again in 1982, and the silver and blue replicas of that car are probably the most attractive of the '82s. However, the T-top Z28 that actually paced the Memorial Day classic that year used a highly modified 350 (5.7-liter) V8 for motivation that wasn't available to the general public. Kind of sad, really.

The three-tier Camaro lineup continued into 1983 with minimal visual differences. However the Z28 got a nice power bump with the introduction of the "L69" engine option. With a Corvette-spec camshaft, revised exhaust and a healthy four-barrel carb, the 5.0-liter L69 "H.O." V8 was rated at 190 horsepower and could be backed by a new five-speed manual transmission.

For 1984, availability of the L69 improved on Z28s (the junky Cross-Fire engine died) and the four-speed "700R4" automatic was adopted by most Camaro models. Because anything digital was, of course, good, the Berlinetta sprouted a funkadelic digital instrument panel and overhead console this year, as well. The instrumentation was probably more entertaining than the V6 that powered most Berlinettas.

The great leap forward in third-generation Camaro performance came with the introduction of the 1985 IROC-Z, named after the International Race of Champions, which was contested with Camaros. The IROC featured big 16-inch five-spoke wheels and unique graphics. Carbureted versions of the 5.0-liter small-block V8 were still available, but the big improvement came with the fitment of Tuned Port Injection (TPI) to that engine to produce a flexible 215 horsepower. Sadly, the TPI engine could only be had with the four-speed automatic (in either the IROC or the regular Z28).

Beneath the Z28, the sport coupe and Berlinetta blustered through 1985 unchanged, except for a new fuel-injected version of the 2.8-liter V6 that now pushed out 135 horsepower.

The 1986 Camaros were easy to spot because of the goofy blister fitted atop their rear hatches to accommodate the federally mandated center high-mounted stop light (CHMSL). Beyond that, there was a new exhaust system for non-Z28 cars and a new basecoat/clearcoat two-stage paint system.

Big engines returned to the Camaro for 1987 with the good old 350 (5.7-liter) V8 making its way into IROC-Zs as an option. Capped with the TPI system, the 5.7 was rated at a full 225 horsepower — the highest horsepower in a Camaro in 13 years and with vastly better drivability. While the TPI 5.7 came only with the four-speed automatic, the TPI 5.0 liter was finally available with the five-speed manual.

Equally good news was the comeback of the Camaro convertible — the first Camaro convertible since 1969 — and the consignment of the four-cylinder engine to a well-deserved eternity in junkyard Hell. The high-output carbureted 5.0-liter V8 also disappeared, and a new 165 horsepower carbureted 5.0-liter V8 became the standard Z28 engine. Also gone from the '87 Camaro line were the Berlinetta (replaced with an "LT" option package), and, on any Camaro with a rear spoiler, that ugly CHMSL housing on the rear glass. The CHMSL was instead built into the spoiler and Chevy would simplify its own production for 1988 by making the rear spoiler standard on all Camaros.

So that brake light blister was gone entirely from the 1988 Camaro, but so was the Z28. Since Chevy had firmly established the IROC name, all high-performance '88 Camaros became IROCs. Base '88 Camaros, meanwhile, inherited the elegant 15-inch five-spoke wheels from the Z28, as well as the Z28's lower body skirting. Also, the Z28's 5.0-liter V8 was now optional on the sport coupe; it gained a throttle body fuel-injection system to make 170 horsepower.

The rarest and most intriguing '88 Camaro was the 1LE road racing package optional on the IROCs with both the 5.0- and 5.7-liter TPI engines. Featuring oversize disc brakes, an aluminum driveshaft and a well-tweaked suspension, the 1LE was built to win showroom stock road races.

Proving that no name is forever dead in the world of Camaros, the old "RS" (but not Rally Sport) designation returned for the 1989 model year. Looking much like an '85 Z28, the RS was a basically a trim package atop the base sport coupe and was powered by either the V6 or a throttle-body-injected 5.0-liter V8. Although the 5.7 TPI V8 now boasted 240 horsepower, about the only way to tell '89 IROCs from previous years is to look at the ignition key and see if has the "Pass-Key" theft deterrent resistor embedded in it.

The IROC breathed its last breath during the short 1990 model year, as Dodge picked up sponsorship of the International Race of Champions. The big changes that year were the growth of the base V6 from 2.8 to 3.1 liters, with a bump in output from 135 to 140 horsepower and the fitment of driver-side airbags to all models.

Chevy jump-started the 1991 model year by re-introducing the Z28 in the spring of 1990. Sure, the '91 Z28 got a tall rear wing, new lower body cladding, new phony hood scoops and new five-spoke wheels, but it was otherwise still an IROC and now the top engine was a 245 horsepower 5.7-liter TPI V8. All other '91 Camaros were pretty much '90 Camaros with revised ground effects that featured fake air inlets.

Law enforcement got its own Camaro in 1991 with the introduction of the Camaro B4C pursuit vehicle. Basically, a B4C was a Z28 that was badged as an RS and equipped with most of the good stuff developed for the 1LE race package. Very few B4Cs were ever produced.

With an all-new Camaro coming for 1993, the 1992 model was barely changed from '91. The big change was that they all sported a "25th Anniversary" badge on their instrument panels. Further, a $175 "Heritage Package" of stripes was offered for any '92 Camaro.

It was time for another new Camaro.

Fourth Generation (1993-2002)

While the 1993 fourth-generation Camaro was very much new, it was shy of all-new; much of the floor stamping and all of the rear suspension was shared with the third-generation car. But with plastic front fenders, a new short-arm/long-arm front suspension, rack-and-pinion steering and a sleek new profile, the '93 was new enough.

For '93, the Camaro lineup was pared to two models: base sport coupe powered by a 160-horsepower 3.4-liter version of GM's V6 and the Z28 with the Corvette's 5.7-liter LT1 small-block V8 underrated at 275 horsepower. Once again, the convertible was gone.

The black-roofed (no matter what the body color) '93 Z28 was a stunner. The LT1 was easily the most powerful small-block installed in the Camaro since its namesake, the 1970 LT-1, and, considering the move from gross to net power ratings, probably even more powerful than that legend. Behind it was either a four-speed automatic or six-speed manual transmission and 16-inch wheels and tires; and four-wheel antilock disc brakes were standard. With Z28 prices starting under $17,000, the value was just amazing. The most desirable '93? Probably the black Z28 replicas of that year's Indy 500 pace car. These replicas were identical to the actual pace car which, in stark contrast to the '82, led the race with no mechanical changes.

As expected, the convertible Camaro returned with the 1994 model year. Designed and built by GM at the St. Therese, Quebec, plant where all F-cars were assembled, the '94 ragtop's chassis was significantly stiffer than the previous convertible's. Otherwise it's almost impossible to tell a '94 coupe from a '93 unless one opens up the automatic transmission and finds that it is the electronically controlled version of the 4L60.

While the 1995 Z28 received only minor changes (all-season tires and traction control were now available), the base Camaro added GM's "3800" 200-horsepower 3.8-liter V6 as an option. The 3800 was both significantly more powerful and refined than the 3400, and by 1996 would become the only V6 in Camaros.

With the adoption of the 3800 as standard power, the least powerful 1996 Camaro still had more power than the most powerful 1984 Camaro. Somewhat in celebration, the RS name reappeared on the V6 coupe as a spoiler and ground effects package. Meanwhile on the Z28 side, the V8's output jumped to 285 horsepower and SLP Engineering brought back the SS name by adding engine tweaks and 17-inch five-spoke wheels wrapped with P245/40ZR17 BFGoodrich Comp T/A tires. The SS, with its 305 horsepower rating was the first factory Camaro to break the 300 horsepower barrier since 1971, and the first of any year using net ratings.

To celebrate the Camaro's 30th anniversary, Chevy introduced a specially optioned white Z28 with orange stripes and orange houndstooth upholstery (evocative of the '69 Camaro pace car) for 1997. Otherwise, there were new "tri-color" taillamps for all models, and SLP produced an extremely limited run (106 cars) of 330-horsepower Corvette LT4 5.7-liter V8-powered Camaro Z28 SS models.

The fourth-generation Camaro's first (and only) extensive visual update came for 1998 with a new front fascia design. But the real news lay behind that face where the C5 Corvette's new-age all-aluminum small-block LS-1 V8 took up residence in the Z28. The 5.7-liter LS-1 was the first all-aluminum engine offered in a Camaro since the '69 ZL-1 and carried a thrilling 305-horsepower rating (base Camaros kept the 200-horsepower 3800 V6). GM took over production of the SS itself this year, as well, with the ram-air induction system boosting the LS-1 to 320 horsepower.

Except for electronic throttle control on V6 models, a new oil life monitor and a Torsen limited-slip differential, the 1999 Camaros were indistinguishable from the '98 models. In turn, the 2000 Camaros were pretty much the same as the '99s, except for radio controls integrated into the steering wheel, body-color sideview mirrors, some new interior fabrics and an optional 12-disc CD changer.

By 2001, it was obvious that the Camaro's days were numbered, and the only changes to the car were restyled 16-inch wheels, a new paint color and the unchanged LS-1's output rating to 310 horsepower in the Z28.

Grimly, the Camaro soldiered on into 2002. For the Camaro's last year in production, changes were, understandably, minimal. Z28s got a new power steering cooler, the sound systems were revised and V6 convertibles got the automatic transmission standard, but that's about it.

Chevrolet did celebrate the car's 35th year, however, with a special graphics package for the Z28 SS coupe and convertible. The flamboyant stripes and logos of the 35th Anniversary package were attractive in their own idiomatic way, but it was hardly the glorious send-off for which Camaro enthusiasts had hoped.

Grimly, the Camaro soldiered on into 2002. For the Camaro's last year in production, changes were, understandably, minimal. Z28s got a new power steering cooler, the sound systems were revised and V6 convertibles got the automatic transmission standard, but that's about it.

Chevrolet did celebrate the car's 35th year, however, with a special graphics package for the Z28 SS coupe and convertible. The flamboyant stripes and logos of the 35th Anniversary package were attractive in their own idiomatic way, but it was hardly the glorious send-off for which Camaro enthusiasts had hoped.

Fifth Generation (2010-Present)

After eight years of flying the Chevy flag at half-mast, Camaro enthusiasts had their prayers answered when Chevrolet brought back its road burner for 2010. Initially available only as a coupe in base LS, midlevel LT and V8-powered SS models, this is without a doubt the best Camaro to date. The retro styling borrows shamelessly from the 1969 Camaro, down to the cowl-induction-style hood, Coke bottle profile, cross-hatch grille and rear-quarter gills. Yet it's not a complete knock-off, as the 2010 has a huskier stance and is noticeably thicker in the rear haunches. The cockpit is mostly modern, with a few old-school touches thrown in such as a quartet of gauges located down low in front of the gearshifter. The latter isn't exactly an ergonomic success, but they pay homage to the optional setup of the late '60s. The available RS package (essentially an appearance package) adds bigger (20-inch) wheels, a rear spoiler, HID headlights and smoked taillights.

Unlike before, getting a V6 Camaro doesn't mean "plenty of show but not so much go." The LS and LT come packing 304 hp via a direct-injected, 3.6-liter V6. It also has a six-speed manual transmission (six-speed automatic optional), disc brakes all around, an independent rear suspension (a Camaro first) and 18-inch wheels. At a base price of around $23,000, the entry-level Camaro offers a heavy dose of performance that's light on the wallet. With 0-to-60 and quarter-mile times of 6.0 and 14.2 seconds, respectively, these are seriously rapid cars.

The big-dog SS has a 6.2-liter V8 with either 426 hp (with six-speed manual) or 400 hp (with six-speed automatic) as well as meatier Brembo disc brakes. With the ability to leap to 60 mph in 5 seconds and tear down the quarter-mile in 13 seconds flat, the SS will show its taillights to virtually any Camaro that came before, perhaps even the super rare ZL-1 of 1969. And in terms of unraveling a twisty road, the latest Camaro has no peer with its elders, thanks to a finely balanced and tuned chassis, the aforementioned independent rear end and quick, communicative steering.

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