Hauls Another Engine - 2015 Ford F-150 Long-Term Road Test
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2015 Ford F-150 Long-Term Road Test

  • Full Review
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  • Road Tests (2)
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  • Long-Term

2015 Ford F-150: Hauls Another Engine

by Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor on November 19, 2015

2015 Ford F-150

Making room for the engine that I schlepped in our Chevrolet Colorado meant evicting a different engine from my garage. Our Colorado is gone, however, so I nabbed our long-term 2015 Ford F-150.

Right away, I knew it wasn't going to go as smoothly this time.

The problem is that the F-150's just too danged big for my driveway. I could back it up only about a quarter of the way up the driveway to the point where a concrete pad juts out. But even if the pad wasn't there, I wouldn't have been able to open the door to get out of the truck.

Fortunately this engine was on an engine stand. I could simply wheel the engine stand down the driveway to meet the truck rather than vice-versa. Sort of. I mentioned last time that my driveway has little stones running down the middle, and that many stones have gone rogue and now litter the concrete stripes you drive on. The engine stand is too wide for its wheels to roll down a single stripe and too narrow to straddle the stone-y middle section.

The solution involved some Yankee ingenuity, aka doing sketchy stuff like stuffing a GoJak under the wider pair of the stand's wheels. This effectively narrowed the stand so it could fit down a single concrete stripe. It also made wheeling the stand an unstable, precarious mess. The GoJak kept swiveling around and jettisoning itself from beneath the stand as I rolled the stand toward the truck.

Anyway, it made it to the truck. I really like how the tailgate is damped on the way down and has assistance when you close it so that there's very little effort involved. The F-150 has a little button to release the tailgate, which is a little strange. Once the engine was in the bed, I strapped it down using the truck's lower anchor points and movable cleats — nice, sturdy and handy.

Then I disassembled the hoist and engine stand and threw them in the bed, too, along with a transmission.

And off I went. While driving, the weight in the bed was largely not noticeable from the driver's seat. The truck just plain didn't care that that stuff was back there. Not surprising considering that this ~600-pound load is a small fraction of the truck's 1630-pound payload capacity.

But I'd still have preferred to use the Colorado.

Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests (2)
  • Comparison
  • Long-Term

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