Monthly Update for October 2017 - 2016 Tesla Model X Long-Term Road Test

2016 Tesla Model X Long-Term Road Test

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests (1)
  • Comparison
  • Long-Term
 

2016 Tesla Model X: Monthly Update for October 2017

by Josh Sadlier, Senior Editor of Content Strategy

Where Did We Drive It?
Our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X kept a low profile in October, racking up about 1,000 miles in total. Many of those miles came courtesy of Dan Frio, our man in Orange County, who had plenty of time to mull over the Model X's eccentricities while sitting in traffic.

We did log one of our best range efforts in a while —a 172-mile jaunt at the beginning of the month. It's worth noting, though, that even though the Model X's theoretical range is well over 200 miles, we haven't traveled that far on a single charge since setting our all-time record of 212.6 miles in April. The big Tesla gives you more range than a typical EV, for sure, but it's not quite the long-distance champ that early reports might have expected it to be.

What Kind of Fuel Economy Did It Get?
For the second month in a row, the Model X spent many of its plugged-in hours with the high-power wall charger at Edmunds HQ, which makes measuring energy consumption relatively straightforward. A few longer trips took us off the grid, however, so we have full consumption data for fewer than half of our October miles.

Miles added this month: 993
Miles with complete data: 420
Consumption over those 420 miles: 46.1 kWh/100 miles (73.1 mpg-e)
EPA consumption rating: 38 kWh/100 miles (89 mpg-e)

Best lifetime observed range: 212.6 miles
Best lifetime projected range: 267.6 miles
Average lifetime projected range: 168.7 miles

Current odometer: 24,920 miles

Maintenance and Upkeep
None.

Logbook Highlights

Interior
"Our Tesla is starting to creak like an old sailboat. There's a consistent screechy clunk when the brakes bring the car to a complete stop, and there's random shudder and shake as the car hauls itself up into a driveway or over garden-variety road rash. You'd probably hear and feel much of the same in many SUVs with 25,000 miles if it weren't for the big V6 or V8 running under the hood. The Tesla's problem is that it operates so quietly that you tend to notice each shimmy and rattle, so you cast a disapproving glance in its direction, unfairly or not. It'll be interesting to see how well these cars are holding up structurally in 2022 and beyond." — Dan Frio, automotive editor

2016 Tesla Model X

"I initially thought the Model X didn't have any hooks for hanging a suit jacket. But I found something that suggests otherwise, namely a couple of pull-tabs on each falcon-wing door that open into a small cavity. Now, I'm not entirely convinced these are designed for hanging clothes. The spring-loaded clamping mechanism suggests they might be, but on the other hand, they place your suit jacket, dry cleaning, whatever, almost dead-center down the middle of the aisle and hinder side and rearward visibility. But this was about as good an answer to this dilemma as I could find in this otherwise relatively feature-free ceiling." — Dan Frio

2016 Tesla Model X

Technology-Audio
"Pretty impressed with the Model X audio system. OK, so maybe an impressive audio system should be a given in a $145,000 car, but you don't always know what you're going to get with these efforts. Some are given thought and labored over, while others just seem cast out to suppliers with a 'best for least' mandate.

"The Tesla's system appears to be designed and supplied by a company under the Harman Kardon umbrella, and that's all right by me. To my ear, Harman, and specifically JBL, delivers the most consistent performance of all the big corporate sound companies. Even H/K's misses are generally better than the grab bag of Bose systems out there.

2016 Tesla Model X

"But here's a system really out to win hearts: It's got a five-band equalizer! No one offers equalizers anymore! And even though these are dopey virtual sliders, they're better than none, and they provide fairly precise touchscreen movement. I prefer a classic 'midrange scoop' when I get a chance to set an EQ, dialing back some of these resonant, muddy midrange frequencies to clear the way for midbass definition and higher frequency clarity. The Model X delivers focused sound all around at pretty decent volume. An adjustable subwoofer level would make it that much better, but as it is, this is a solid effort. And it only cost us six figures." — Dan Frio

2016 Tesla Model X

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests (1)
  • Comparison
  • Long-Term

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Past Long-Term Road Tests