2016 Tesla Model X Long-Term Road Test - New Updates

2016 Tesla Model X Long-Term Road Test

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2016 Tesla Model X: Monthly Update for November 2016

by Ed Hellwig, Executive Editor

2016 Tesla Model X

Where Did We Drive It?
Much like last month, our Tesla Model X was confined to commuter duty for most of November. It wowed kids in school parking lots, carried plates of food on Thanksgiving, and otherwise played the part of a typical family vehicle. Unlike last month, however, it didn't spend any time cooling its heels at the service center. We did see that a recall was issued for certain Model X charge-plug adapters, but our particular parts were not affected.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Monthly Update for October 2016

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor

2016 Tesla Model X

Where Did We Drive It?
Following last month's Hydrogen Highway vs. Tesla Supercharger experiment, our long-term Model X has returned to its regular commuting duties. The big news for October was a service call to address 16(!) minor issues that had piled up. As fate would have it, yet another isolated issue arose after the service that may affect us on the few rainy days we get here.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Noisy Air Conditioning

by Ed Hellwig, Executive Editor on October 24, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

We've had a fair share of issues with our Tesla Model X so far, but most of them have been minor problems that didn't affect its overall roadworthiness. This latest annoyance falls into that category. It's a loud rattle that usually crops up when the air conditioning has been on for an extended period of time.

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2016 Tesla Model X: More Unexpected Noises

by Cameron Rogers, Associate Editor on October 3, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Another day, another funny noise coming from our 2016 Tesla Model X. I signed the car out soon after Mark caught the steering column making a sound like the Shoe who gets Dipped in Who Framed Roger Rabbit? I didn't know about the noise before I took it home, so when I heard something funny I notified keymaster Mike Schmidt. He informed me of Mark's observations, but this was something different.

And in less than 24 hours, I noticed two more distinct sounds emanating from our electrified SUV.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Supercharger Shortcut on the Return Leg From Lake Tahoe

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on September 30, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

I step around the power cord that juts from the rear flank of our 2016 Tesla Model X, pop open the hatch and arrange my bags in the luggage well. After unplugging our Lake Tahoe hotel's complimentary Destination charger, I click a ballpoint and note the battery's full status and new range — 248 miles — in the Tesla's logbook. Jay stands nearby tossing his gear into the trunk of his Toyota Mirai, which I know has less than half a tank of hydrogen because I parked it last night.

We exit the hotel lot together and line up at a red light, waiting to turn left. The border runs down the middle of the street we're on. I briefly consider opening my door and stamping my foot across the dashed center line so part of me can be in Nevada, but then the left arrow turns green and I drive my entire self into the state instead.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Math, Befuddled Software and Chasing A Mirai to Lake Tahoe

by Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor on September 28, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

I'm on my way north from Santa Monica in our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X, "chasing" (har har) Dan Edmunds in the Mirai. We're headed to Lake Tahoe. Same route. No combustion.  

Things have changed. When I last road-tripped a Tesla, it was our old Model S a couple of years ago. At the time, not only was the Supercharger network less developed than it is now, but the on-board software wasn't as capable.

Back then, the onus was entirely on the driver (or passenger, if you are so equipped) to do the math of when to stop to charge, and for how long. If you're trying to minimize your downtime on a long trip, you end up constantly assessing your current rate of consumption and adjusting your driving style as needed so that you arrive at each Supercharger with as little juice in the tank as possible. This minimizes your time spent recharging.

But there's an element of stress at play. If you're playing this game right, you're rolling into each Supercharger with as close to zero miles remaining in the tank as your confidence allows. If you forget to, say, carry the two, you could end up stranded on the side of the road.

Today, it's easier. Or is it?

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2016 Tesla Model X: Hydrogen Highway vs. Tesla Supercharger Network

by Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor on September 26, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

While the hydrogen refueling infrastructure for our long-term 2016 Toyota Mirai is currently in its infancy, it's strikingly similar to Tesla's Supercharger network of a few years ago. At least it is in the central California corridor.

This got Dan Edmunds and me thinking.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Door and Window Confusion

by Mike Schmidt, Vehicle Testing Manager on September 23, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

"Hey Mike. The driver window in our Tesla makes a funny noise. It doesn't happen all the time, but it happens a lot." That was the only information at my disposal when I drove our 2016 Tesla Model X home to try and diagnose the issue, or at least repeat it.

This is a weird one.

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2016 Tesla Model X: A Less Automatic Autopilot

by Ed Hellwig, Executive Editor on September 21, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

You might have heard that Tesla has updated the Autopilot feature offered on vehicles like our 2016 Tesla Model X. The company cited various reasons why the updates were made, but one major factor was that too many owners were putting too much trust in the system.

Now it works a little differently. 

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2016 Tesla Model X: Destination Charging is a Thing

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on September 19, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Cross-country travel in a car like our 2016 Tesla Model X is possible and practical because of the Supercharger network. And today's network is even stronger than it was two years ago, when we drove our 2013 Model S to New York and back in less than a week. As of today, the fansite supercharge.info says there are 296 active Supercharger stations spread across the USA, with 15 more under construction and 13 others that have received permits.

But Tesla's free charging network has another component. It's called Destination Charging, and it's not as well-known.

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2016 Tesla Model X: The Overlooked Front Doors

by Cole Briggs, Editorial Intern on September 14, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

The Falcon Wing doors on our 2016 Tesla Model X draw crowds wherever you go. I mean, how many SUVs can pull up next to an SLS AMG and open their doors the same way? Crickets.

As enticing as those doors are, however, I think the drawbacks overshadow the cool factor. As Jay explained, the list is long.

And because of all the attention the Falcon Doors attract, the nicely executed front doors get overlooked.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Doors Get a Firmware Update

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on September 12, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

It had barely been a month since the previous firmware update for our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X when I received a notification to schedule the next one.

Somewhat confusingly, this update had the same name as the last one (v7.1), and it, too, had to do with the Falcon Wing doors.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Fooled by a Mirage

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on September 7, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X doesn't just detect when a vehicle is near, it also determines what kind of vehicle it is. Sometimes you'll see a motorcycle, a big truck or a standard car.

I got stuck in LA's notorious traffic and had an opportunity to see the system's real-time processing in action.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Strange Steering Column Noises

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on September 5, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

As I was leaving Edmunds HQ in our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X, I heard a strange noise coming from the steering column. It was sort of a murmur when I'd turn the wheel sharply. I took a video (see below; that's a screenshot above) so you can experience it for yourself. It's faint, so headphones may be in order.

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2016 Tesla Model X: It's a Mainstream Car - in Southern California

by Ed Hellwig, Executive Editor on September 1, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Looking out the window of our 2016 Tesla Model X and seeing another Tesla might seem like a rare occurrence. And in much of the country it would be. In Southern California, however, it's practically unavoidable.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Self-Parking?

Travis Langness, Automotive Editor on August 30, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

On my fourth day heading home in our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X, a new display popped up on the center screen that I had not seen before. 'Autopark Ready' the screen read. "How nice, it knows I'm home and it wants to park for me. Sure, why not?" I thought. So, I gave the Tesla the reins. It didn't go as well as I'd hope.

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2016 Tesla Model X: We Chose a Nice Color

Travis Langness, Automotive Editor on August 24, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

With our last long-term Tesla, we went with a dark blue or as Tesla calls it, "Deep Metallic Blue." It was good-looking, no doubt, and certainly better than all the boring beige sedans on the road today, but it wasn't my favorite. With our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X we opted for a fantastically deep red. The red looks good at night and even better in sunlight. Tesla calls it, drumroll please... "Red Multi-Coat." OK, so the name isn't exactly a charmer, but boy, does the paint look good.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Temporary Gremlins

by Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor on August 17, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

I drove our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X home for the first time in quite a while. That's when I spotted a couple of gremlins.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Best Rearview Camera Out There

by Travis Langness, Automotive Editor on August 1, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X shares a lot of traits with the Model S, and one of them is the giant center screen that controls about 90% of the cabin activities. That screen is responsible for the rearview camera display, and since the screen is like two jumbo iPads stacked on top of each other, there's plenty of space to see what's going on behind you.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Mercedes-Compatible

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on July 28, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

No, this isn't a post about the Falcon Wing doors evoking the Gullwing 300SL. As one of the Edmunds editors, I switch in and out of cars on an almost daily basis. By my reckoning, it's been about seven years since I've regularly driven one car. But we recently moved our offices, and in the time between spaces, I had the rare opportunity to live with our 2016 Tesla Model X for almost two straight weeks.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Update 7.1

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on July 26, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Buzz went my phone and instead of a text, it was a message from the Tesla app. A software update was available for our 2016 Tesla Model X, and I could specify a time to install it. I selected 1:00 am that night.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Full Charge Means No Regenerative Braking

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on July 20, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Heading into a long weekend, I decided to give our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X a full charge rather than the usual 90 percent. Once on the road, the regenerative braking system was clearly feeling the effects.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Adjustable Headrests (Someday)

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on July 14, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Unlike our old Model S, the 2016 Tesla Model X has headrests that move up and down. The problem, at least for now, is that we don't have any control over it.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Power Loss When Parked

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on July 12, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Batteries will slowly deplete themselves without powering anything, this is a fact of life. Our 2016 Tesla Model X is no different. I spent five days with it and between the time I parked it at night until I dragged myself out of the apartment the next morning, I noted a slight decrease in range.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Road Trip to Big Sur

by Josh Sadlier, Senior Editor on July 8, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

When I signed out the 2016 Tesla Model X for the weekend and realized I had no plans, I did what any reasonable car nut would do.

Checked the Supercharger network and headed for Big Sur.

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2016 Tesla Model X: My First Supercharger, and Autopilot Inconsistencies

by Cameron Rogers, Associate Editor on July 5, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

A couple weeks ago, I attended the U.S. launch event for the 2017 Fiat 124 Spider in San Diego. From the Edmunds office in Santa Monica, my hotel was a straight shot south on Highways 405 and 5. I decided to make the trip in the 2016 Tesla Model X for a couple reasons. I wanted to test the Tesla's Autopilot function on the highway as well as use a Supercharger station for the first time.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Limited Rearward Visibility

by Ed Hellwig, Executive Editor on June 30, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Every time I get behind the wheel of our 2016 Tesla Model X I'm surprised by its lack of rearward visibility. Looking into the rearview mirror is like peeking through some window blinds, which is surprising given how this SUV looks like a rolling greenhouse from the outside.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Using the Trailer Hitch To Haul Bicycles

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on June 28, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

I understand that you're tired of hearing about the so-called "Falcon Wing" doors on our 2016 Tesla Model X. I'm equally tired of harping on them, quite frankly, but those doors are liable to stand in the way of it being named the official car of the US Ski Team or any pro cycling team.

The need to carry such things as bikes, snowboards, kayaks, surfboards and roof storage pods is a fairly basic SUV requirement. But with the Model X's roof off limits, its factory tow hitch is the only way that cyclists and skiers can tote their gear. The way forward for kayakers and families that need extra road-trip storage is less clear.

Tesla painted themselves into a corner with those doors, in other words, and the hitch was their way out. They simply had to provide one, and the towing shortcomings I uncovered during my recent tow test supports my growing suspicion that actual towing may not have been the prime motivation.

But I digress.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Autopilot Day and Night

by Travis Langness, Automotive Editor on June 24, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

A few editors have tested the Autopilot feature in our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X and have generally spoken its praises. Office musings of the Model X's "best adaptive cruise system currently available" and the potential of a hands-free commute is pretty enticing. Clearly, I wanted to test it out for myself. So, with four passengers on a short trip to and from Dodger Stadium, I set the Model X loose.

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2016 Tesla Model X: The Doors Are Dangerous

by Travis Langness, Automotive Editor on June 22, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Aside from being inconvenient, cumbersome, slow to operate and just downright silly (all issues that Jay pointed out earlier along with several others), the doors on our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X are dangerous. More specifically, the automated functions of these doors have caused physical harm to at least two human beings (including myself) in my presence.

Here's how it happened.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Performance Tested

by Mike Schmidt, Vehicle Testing Manager on June 20, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

We took our 2016 Tesla Model X out to the see how it would perform on our test track. Take the jump to see how fast Ludicrous Mode really is.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Center Console Cover Is Broken

by James Riswick, New & Used Car Editor on June 16, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

The sliding door that covers our 2016 Tesla Model X's main center console bin is broken. You can slide it forward all you want but it just slides closed again as it was when I took the above photo. Want to use the clever cupholders below? Too bad.

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2016 Tesla Model X: The App Keeps Me Cool

by Travis Langness, Automotive Editor on June 14, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

We got an early dose of summer in Southern California this week. Sure enough, parking our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X outside my local gym resulted in a big increase in cabin temperature. Cue the app.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Installing the Sunshade

by Travis Langness, Automotive Editor on June 13, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

The windshield in our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X is really big. It's so big that it comes with a sun-screen-thingy to keep direct sunlight off your noggin. Even though the upper glass on the massive receding-hairline windshield is tinted, it doesn't protect you 100 percent from the midday sun, so included with the purchase of the Model X is a collapsible sunshade.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Range and Charging While Towing a Trailer

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on June 9, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

My trip to Flagstaff is complete. I successfully towed a teardrop trailer over 1,000 miles behind our 2016 Tesla Model X crossover SUV.

I'm not sure I ever want to do it again.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Towing a Teardrop Trailer to Flagstaff

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on June 6, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

This is uncharted territory for me. For you, too, I expect. I've got loads of trailer towing miles under my belt, but our 2016 Tesla Model X is the first electric vehicle I've ever towed with. There's good reason for that. Before Tesla came along there was never an EV with enough battery capacity to make it feasible, and no nationwide fast-charging network to make it possible to get anywhere.

The Model X is the first EV that's been blessed with a tow rating and factory-installed towing equipment. You've probably already seen my discussion of its unique hitch, but in case you haven't it's best to hop over here and come back. We'll wait.

Weird, right? You probably noticed that the Tesla Model X is rated to tow 5,000 pounds. And that ours can tow just 3,500 pounds because it has the optional 22-inch wheels and tires. But I'm leery of even this modest figure because of the realities of towing out west: mountain grades, heat, desert winds. Amid such nagging doubts I wanted to start small.

These issues were not purely theoretical because I had a specific destination in mind: Flagstaff, Arizona. All of the above factors (and more) would come into play as I headed there on a 1,000-mile round trip to attend a Ram Trucks event at the Overland Expo.

One specific family of trailers seemed to fit the bill. I started looking for a teardrop, and I found a truly outstanding example for hire at Off the Grid Rentals.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Installing the Hidden Trailer Hitch

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on June 2, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

I realize you may have a hard time believing this as a picture of a 2016 Tesla Model X because the shot does not depict or refer to open Falcon-wing doors in any way, shape or form. If it helps, feel free to imagine them flying high up there somewhere.

But the closed door/hatch that you see here is a Tesla Model X giveaway, just the same. It conceals something the Model S does not have: a built-in trailer hitch that gives the Model X plug-and-play towing capability of a sort you might not have seen before.

Thus-equipped, a Model X can tow as much as 5,000 pounds, but that only applies if you stick with the standard 20-inch wheels and tires. Opt for the 22-inch rubber (or buy a Signature, like we did) and the rating drops to 3,500 pounds.

But the hitch isn't just for people that tow trailers. The presence of those Falcon doors you are currently imagining makes it impossible to fit a bike or ski rack to the roof of an X. You'll need to use a hitch-mounted rack for anything like that, which means this hitch is destined to be a must-have item for a large percentage of Model X buyers.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Testing the Autopilot Function

by Reese Counts, Vehicle Testing Assistant on June 1, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

I finally got a chance to take our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X home for a night. My 20-mile commute consists of 19 miles through Los Angeles traffic along Interstate 10, west in the morning, east at night. As terrible as that 80-minute one-way drive may be, it's given me plenty of time to try various new and interesting tech. For the Model X, this meant trying Tesla's Autopilot system.

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2016 Tesla Model X: 14 Drawbacks to Those Doors

by Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor on May 31, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Okay, real talk. The articulating doors on our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X make my blood boil.

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2016 Tesla Model X: 32 Cool Things

by Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor on May 27, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Did you catch the video of 32 cool things about our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X?

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2016 Tesla Model X: Using an EKM Meter to Track Power Consumption

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on May 25, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Electric cars are fundamentally different from gasoline ones on many levels, and fuel consumption tracking is no exception. Like many electric cars, our 2016 Tesla Model X has a set of dash readouts that summarize electricity consumption. They display the consumption rate in Watt-hours per mile (Wh/mile) and total usage for a given "tank" in kilowatt-hours (kWh).

Confused? The first is akin to mpg and the second is like gallons.

But there is a bigger problem. Both numbers are drawn from the point of view of the battery. That doesn't tell the entire story for electric cars because of something called charging losses. Imagine pumping 12 gallons at a filling station and spilling two of them on the ground in the process. The car only knows about the 10 gallons that made it into the tank, but your wallet knows about all 12 of them.

This is no clumsy accident when it comes to electric cars. It's another type of routine consumption that stems from the resistance in the long charging cord and the needs of the on-board battery temperature control systems that operate during the charging process. The only way to account for everything the car is using, charging losses and all, is to look at the meter on the pump. But many EV charge stations, including our Tesla HPWC (High Power Wall Connector), do not have the sort of meter found on every gas pump on the planet.

So we added one.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Service for Recall and Issues

by Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor on May 23, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Though the third-row seat recall for our 2016 Tesla Model X had been issued about a month ago, our local Tesla service center didn't have the parts necessary to perform the correction. In the meantime we didn't put anybody in the third row, as instructed, and identified a few issues we wanted them to address, too.

Ultimately the recall was addressed and the issues resolved. The downtime, however, was significant.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Innovative Cupholder Design

by Ed Hellwig, Executive Editor on May 11, 2016

 2016 Tesla Model X

Cupholder design probably wasn't very high on the priority list for the designers of the 2016 Tesla Model X, yet they took a pretty good stab at doing it differently anyway. The result is a nice looking, if not notably superior, setup.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Good Seats, Not Great Seats

by Ed Hellwig, Executive Editor on May 9, 2016

 2016 Tesla Model X

Great seats are one of the things that makes high-dollar luxury cars feel a cut above the rest. The front seats in our Tesla Model X are good, but not great.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Ludicrous Mode Broke the Model X

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on May 5, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

If you thought that I wouldn't try out Ludicrous mode in our 2016 Tesla Model X, you don't know me. It was everything I thought it'd be. Shockingly quick with a hearty punch to the gut. But it broke something.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Smarter Parking Sensors

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on May 3, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

There's a lot about our 2016 Tesla Model X and our old Model S that I consider revolutionary. There are also features that are smartly evolutionary. Take the parking sensors for example

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2016 Tesla Model X: Supersized Supercharger Network

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on April 29, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Tesla's Supercharger network has grown tremendously, and that means we have a lot more road trip options to explore with our 2016 Tesla Model X . The map above represents the state of the network in mid-June 2014 when Kurt and I undertook a massive LA-to-New York-to-LA cross-country round trip road trip, a feat we completed in less than a week.

Back then there were just 95 stations. You can guess which way we went just by looking at the map. Apart from our decision to chance a straighter path between Las Vegas and Utah, there was but a single cross-country option.

That map looks significantly more crowded today.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Not the First With a "Big Sky" Roof

by James Riswick, New & Used Car Editor on April 27, 2016

 Vauxhall Astra

The 2016 Tesla Model X's "Big Sky" panoramic windshield is just one of its many "hey look at me!"features that makes it oh-so-different from other SUVs. Its pros and cons have already been touched upon, but the concept itself got me wondering: Who did it first?

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2016 Tesla Model X: A Buyer's Timeline

by Ronald Montoya, Senior Consumer Advice Editor on April 22, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Buying a new Tesla model requires faith in Elon Musk, a chunk of money upfront and a lot of patience. As former Tesla Model S owners, this wasn't our first electric-car rodeo with Elon. We knew exactly what we were getting into when we ordered our 2016 Tesla Model X.

But if you're someone who's never plunked down a deposit of a thousand dollars — or 40 times that — for a just-past-the-concept-stage Tesla, here's a diary of what you might expect:

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2016 Tesla Model X: Panoramic Windshield

by Ed Hellwig, Executive Editor on April 18, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Yes, that's the windshield in our 2016 Tesla Model X. It's a standard feature of the new SUV and one of the unique features that makes the Model X such a conversation starter. It also makes me nervous.

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2016 Tesla Model X: Recall Issued

by Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor on April 12, 2016

2016 Tesla Model

Tesla issued a voluntary recall for the 2016 Tesla Model X on April 11th. An email was sent by Tesla to owners of affected vehicles notifying them that the third-row seatback recliner could let go in a frontal crash.

The recall affects about 2,700 Model Xs, all of which were produced before 26 March of this year. Since our car is a Signature (number 921 of about 1,000) model, it enjoyed priority delivery status over non-Signatures and as such was presumably built early in the production run.

Sure enough, the VIN of our Model X indicates a February build date, thus it must be one of those affected by the recall campaign.

Right?

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2016 Tesla Model X: Introduction

by Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor on April 11, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Electric vehicles are still rare, but improvements in range and desirability have raised their profile far beyond their actual sales numbers. Most of the electric vehicles (EVs) currently on the market are compact hatchbacks or sedans. Other than the short-lived Toyota RAV4 EV, electric SUVs have largely been absent.

The new 2016 Tesla Model X changes that. With seating for up to seven passengers and a larger cabin than the Model S sedan upon which it is largely based, the Model X is as close to a purpose-built electric SUV as the world has seen to date.

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Past Long-Term Road Tests