Used 2013 Cadillac ATS Sedan Review & Ratings | Edmunds
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Used 2013 Cadillac ATS Sedan Review

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2013 Cadillac ATS Sedan

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Summary

Edmunds Summary Review of the 2013 Cadillac ATS Sedan

  • B Edmunds Rating
  • The 2013 Cadillac ATS finally gives the U.S. a medal-worthy entry in the segment of compact sport sedans.

  • Pros

    Spirited performance from 2.0 Turbo and 3.6 models; excellent handling/ride balance; engaging driving dynamics from both rear-wheel and all-wheel-drive platforms; user-friendly infotainment interface.

  • Cons

    Lackluster base engine performance; smallish backseat and trunk.

  • What's New for 2013

    The 2013 Cadillac ATS is an all-new model.

Review

If you can't remember any small Cadillac sedans of the past, consider yourself lucky, as neither the Opel Omega-based Catera or Chevy Cavalier-based Cimarron offer particularly fond memories. Fortunately, all that matters now is the fact that the 2013 Cadillac ATS stands as an impressive entry in a class full of overachieving sport sedans.

It's no secret that the Cadillac folks have aimed the rear-wheel-drive ATS squarely at the well-rounded BMW 3 Series, which has defined the segment for years. The ATS's exterior dimensions essentially mirror those of the 3 Series, and the ATS offers fine build quality, feisty performance and an involving drive along with a supple ride, just like the benchmark Bimmer. Cadillac's newest model also offers a logical electronic interface with which to work all the handy interior convenience gizmos, which is a crucial component in this segment of luxury cars.

The Cadillac ATS stacks up well against its rival. On the road, it delivers excellent steering feel and an agile, well-balanced ride. Contributing to the sharp dynamics is the fact that this Caddy is the lightest car in its class (by 70-150 pounds, depending on trim). Further adding to the ATS's athleticism is its ideal 50/50 weight distribution between the front and rear wheels.

With a trio of engine choices available, the ATS's performance ranges from tepid to thrilling. The base 2.5-liter four serves as the price and fuel economy leader, although its 202-horsepower output lags behind the base engines found in the competition. Meanwhile, the turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-4 packs a solid midrange punch and is the only choice in the ATS range that can be had with a manual gearbox. With 321 hp, the energetic V6 offers a sweet soundtrack and is well-matched to a very responsive automatic transmission.

There are a few minor issues with the ATS. Enthusiasts may wish for a manual gearbox with the top engine, while the rear seats and trunk are less roomy than what some rivals offer. Of course, this segment isn't exactly bereft of talent, either. The 2013 BMW 3 Series still takes top honors by virtue of its superior base powertrain and slightly even more engaging driving dynamics, but it's also typically more expensive. We're also quite fond of the similarly well-rounded Audi A4, the refined Mercedes-Benz C-Class and value-packed -- if not as polished -- Infiniti G sedan. But overall, the 2013 Cadillac ATS is a very strong contender in the very, very competitive segment of compact sport sedans.

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

The 2013 Cadillac ATS is a five-passenger, luxury-oriented sport sedan that is offered in four trim levels: base, Luxury, Performance and Premium.

Standard features on the base trim include 17-inch alloy wheels, heated mirrors, automatic headlights, cruise control, dual-zone automatic climate control, six-way power front seats with power lumbar, leatherette premium vinyl upholstery, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, OnStar, Bluetooth phone connectivity and a seven-speaker Bose sound system with satellite radio, an iPod/USB interface and an auxiliary audio jack.

The Luxury trim adds run-flat tires, keyless entry/ignition, remote engine start, eight-way power front seats, front and rear park assist, a rearview camera, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, leather seating, driver memory functions, a 60/40 split-folding rear seat (with pass-through), HD radio, Bluetooth audio streaming and the CUE infotainment interface.

The Performance trim (not available with 2.5-liter engine) further adds dual exhaust outlets, a Driver Awareness package (forward collision alert, rear cross-traffic alert, lane departure warning, automatic wipers and rear seat side airbags), an active aero grille, xenon headlights, an upgraded 10-speaker Bose surround-sound audio system (with a CD player), front sport seats (with driver-side bolster adjustment) and a fixed rear seat with pass-through.

Stepping up to the Premium trim (not available with 2.5-liter engine) adds 18-inch wheels, a navigation system, a color head-up display and the 60/40 split-folding rear seat. An ATS Premium with rear-wheel drive also comes with summer tires, a sport-tuned suspension, adaptive suspension dampers and a limited-slip rear differential.

Many of the features that are standard for the upper trim levels are available as options on the lower trims. A few other optional packages are also available. The Driver Assistance package includes the features from the Awareness package and adds adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitoring, collision preparation with brake assist, and the color head-up display. The Cold Weather package includes heated front seats and a heated steering wheel. The Track Performance package adds an engine oil cooler and upgraded brake pads. Other options include different wheels, a sunroof and a trunk cargo organizer.

Powertrains and Performance

The 2.5 models come with a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine that produces 202 hp and 190 pound-feet of torque. The 2.0 Turbo models come with a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder rated at 272 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. The 3.6 models come with a 3.6-liter V6 that cranks out 321 hp and 274 lb-ft of torque.

All ATS engines come matched to a six-speed automatic transmission except the 2.0 Turbo, which can also be had with a six-speed manual. Rear-wheel drive is standard across the board, with all-wheel drive optional for the 2.0- and 3.6-liter engines.

In Edmunds testing, a rear-drive ATS 2.0T with the manual went from zero to 60 mph in 6.3 seconds. A rear-drive ATS 3.6 Premium with an automatic accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 5.7 seconds. Both times are average among similarly powered entry-level sport sedans.

EPA-estimated fuel economy for the ATS 2.5 stands at 22 mpg city/33 mpg highway and 26 mpg combined. The V6 is estimated to achieve 19/28/26 with rear-wheel drive and Cadillac claims the 2.0-liter Turbo will get the same with an automatic transmission. With all-wheel drive, the ATS V6 drops to 18/26/21.

Safety

Standard safety features for the 2013 Cadillac ATS include antilock disc brakes, traction control, stability control, active front head restraints, front-seat side and knee airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. Also standard is OnStar, which includes automatic crash notification, on-demand roadside assistance, remote door unlocking, stolen vehicle assistance and turn-by-turn navigation. Optional are the aforementioned Driver Awareness and Driver Assistance packages.

In Edmunds brake testing, an ATS 3.6 Premium came to a stop from 60 mph in an impressively short 108 feet. A 2.0T stopped in an average distance of 113 feet.

Interior Design and Special Features

Inside its cabin, the 2013 Cadillac ATS boasts a variety of high-quality materials, including tasteful wood and metallic accents. The available CUE infotainment interface features large icons and operates like an iPhone or iPad, which is to say you operate it by tapping, flicking, swiping or spreading your fingers -- making it familiar for many users. Furthermore, "Haptic" feedback lets you know when you've pressed a virtual button by pulsing when you touch it.

Up front, the seats do a nice job of holding one in place during spirited drives, and it's fairly easy to find a comfortable driving position. Oddly, the optional sport seats don't provide much more in the way of lateral support for the driver, despite their power-adjustable bolsters.

Rear-seat headroom is good, but knee room is tight for taller folks. Despite a wide opening, the ATS's trunk offers just 10.2 cubic feet of capacity — downright stingy for this segment. Fortunately, some trims feature a 60/40 split-folding rear seat, which helps in this regard.

Driving Impressions

The 2013 Cadillac ATS is an impressive all-around performer, thanks to a poised ride, sure-footed cornering capability and excellent response from the steering and brakes. The 2.5-liter engine is smooth, but it delivers tepid acceleration compared to other entry-level powertrains, notably that of the BMW 328i. Opt for one of the other ATS engines, however, and you'll have no complaint, as they provide thrust more in keeping with this Cadillac's athletic personality. Although enthusiasts may lament the lack of a manual transmission for the V6, the six-speed automatic is hard to fault. Switched to Sport mode, this automatic knows just when to hold a gear and provides smooth, rev-matched downshifts right on time, every time.

Even with its sporting calibration, the Cadillac ATS takes neglected city streets in stride, absorbing the shock of potholes and broken pavement without upsetting the car or its occupants. As a result, the compact Cadillac makes for a fine daily driver that can also provide plenty of entertainment on a Sunday morning drive.

Full Edmunds Expert Review: 2013 Cadillac ATS Sedan

What's New for 2013

The 2013 Cadillac ATS is an all-new model.

Introduction

If you can't remember any small Cadillac sedans of the past, consider yourself lucky, as neither the Opel Omega-based Catera or Chevy Cavalier-based Cimarron offer particularly fond memories. Fortunately, all that matters now is the fact that the 2013 Cadillac ATS stands as an impressive entry in a class full of overachieving sport sedans.

It's no secret that the Cadillac folks have aimed the rear-wheel-drive ATS squarely at the well-rounded BMW 3 Series, which has defined the segment for years. The ATS's exterior dimensions essentially mirror those of the 3 Series, and the ATS offers fine build quality, feisty performance and an involving drive along with a supple ride, just like the benchmark Bimmer. Cadillac's newest model also offers a logical electronic interface with which to work all the handy interior convenience gizmos, which is a crucial component in this segment of luxury cars.

The Cadillac ATS stacks up well against its rival. On the road, it delivers excellent steering feel and an agile, well-balanced ride. Contributing to the sharp dynamics is the fact that this Caddy is the lightest car in its class (by 70-150 pounds, depending on trim). Further adding to the ATS's athleticism is its ideal 50/50 weight distribution between the front and rear wheels.

With a trio of engine choices available, the ATS's performance ranges from tepid to thrilling. The base 2.5-liter four serves as the price and fuel economy leader, although its 202-horsepower output lags behind the base engines found in the competition. Meanwhile, the turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-4 packs a solid midrange punch and is the only choice in the ATS range that can be had with a manual gearbox. With 321 hp, the energetic V6 offers a sweet soundtrack and is well-matched to a very responsive automatic transmission.

There are a few minor issues with the ATS. Enthusiasts may wish for a manual gearbox with the top engine, while the rear seats and trunk are less roomy than what some rivals offer. Of course, this segment isn't exactly bereft of talent, either. The 2013 BMW 3 Series still takes top honors by virtue of its superior base powertrain and slightly even more engaging driving dynamics, but it's also typically more expensive. We're also quite fond of the similarly well-rounded Audi A4, the refined Mercedes-Benz C-Class and value-packed -- if not as polished -- Infiniti G sedan. But overall, the 2013 Cadillac ATS is a very strong contender in the very, very competitive segment of compact sport sedans.

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

The 2013 Cadillac ATS is a five-passenger, luxury-oriented sport sedan that is offered in four trim levels: base, Luxury, Performance and Premium.

Standard features on the base trim include 17-inch alloy wheels, heated mirrors, automatic headlights, cruise control, dual-zone automatic climate control, six-way power front seats with power lumbar, leatherette premium vinyl upholstery, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, OnStar, Bluetooth phone connectivity and a seven-speaker Bose sound system with satellite radio, an iPod/USB interface and an auxiliary audio jack.

The Luxury trim adds run-flat tires, keyless entry/ignition, remote engine start, eight-way power front seats, front and rear park assist, a rearview camera, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, leather seating, driver memory functions, a 60/40 split-folding rear seat (with pass-through), HD radio, Bluetooth audio streaming and the CUE infotainment interface.

The Performance trim (not available with 2.5-liter engine) further adds dual exhaust outlets, a Driver Awareness package (forward collision alert, rear cross-traffic alert, lane departure warning, automatic wipers and rear seat side airbags), an active aero grille, xenon headlights, an upgraded 10-speaker Bose surround-sound audio system (with a CD player), front sport seats (with driver-side bolster adjustment) and a fixed rear seat with pass-through.

Stepping up to the Premium trim (not available with 2.5-liter engine) adds 18-inch wheels, a navigation system, a color head-up display and the 60/40 split-folding rear seat. An ATS Premium with rear-wheel drive also comes with summer tires, a sport-tuned suspension, adaptive suspension dampers and a limited-slip rear differential.

Many of the features that are standard for the upper trim levels are available as options on the lower trims. A few other optional packages are also available. The Driver Assistance package includes the features from the Awareness package and adds adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitoring, collision preparation with brake assist, and the color head-up display. The Cold Weather package includes heated front seats and a heated steering wheel. The Track Performance package adds an engine oil cooler and upgraded brake pads. Other options include different wheels, a sunroof and a trunk cargo organizer.

Powertrains and Performance

The 2.5 models come with a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine that produces 202 hp and 190 pound-feet of torque. The 2.0 Turbo models come with a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder rated at 272 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. The 3.6 models come with a 3.6-liter V6 that cranks out 321 hp and 274 lb-ft of torque.

All ATS engines come matched to a six-speed automatic transmission except the 2.0 Turbo, which can also be had with a six-speed manual. Rear-wheel drive is standard across the board, with all-wheel drive optional for the 2.0- and 3.6-liter engines.

In Edmunds testing, a rear-drive ATS 2.0T with the manual went from zero to 60 mph in 6.3 seconds. A rear-drive ATS 3.6 Premium with an automatic accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 5.7 seconds. Both times are average among similarly powered entry-level sport sedans.

EPA-estimated fuel economy for the ATS 2.5 stands at 22 mpg city/33 mpg highway and 26 mpg combined. The V6 is estimated to achieve 19/28/26 with rear-wheel drive and Cadillac claims the 2.0-liter Turbo will get the same with an automatic transmission. With all-wheel drive, the ATS V6 drops to 18/26/21.

Safety

Standard safety features for the 2013 Cadillac ATS include antilock disc brakes, traction control, stability control, active front head restraints, front-seat side and knee airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. Also standard is OnStar, which includes automatic crash notification, on-demand roadside assistance, remote door unlocking, stolen vehicle assistance and turn-by-turn navigation. Optional are the aforementioned Driver Awareness and Driver Assistance packages.

In Edmunds brake testing, an ATS 3.6 Premium came to a stop from 60 mph in an impressively short 108 feet. A 2.0T stopped in an average distance of 113 feet.

Interior Design and Special Features

Inside its cabin, the 2013 Cadillac ATS boasts a variety of high-quality materials, including tasteful wood and metallic accents. The available CUE infotainment interface features large icons and operates like an iPhone or iPad, which is to say you operate it by tapping, flicking, swiping or spreading your fingers -- making it familiar for many users. Furthermore, "Haptic" feedback lets you know when you've pressed a virtual button by pulsing when you touch it.

Up front, the seats do a nice job of holding one in place during spirited drives, and it's fairly easy to find a comfortable driving position. Oddly, the optional sport seats don't provide much more in the way of lateral support for the driver, despite their power-adjustable bolsters.

Rear-seat headroom is good, but knee room is tight for taller folks. Despite a wide opening, the ATS's trunk offers just 10.2 cubic feet of capacity — downright stingy for this segment. Fortunately, some trims feature a 60/40 split-folding rear seat, which helps in this regard.

Driving Impressions

The 2013 Cadillac ATS is an impressive all-around performer, thanks to a poised ride, sure-footed cornering capability and excellent response from the steering and brakes. The 2.5-liter engine is smooth, but it delivers tepid acceleration compared to other entry-level powertrains, notably that of the BMW 328i. Opt for one of the other ATS engines, however, and you'll have no complaint, as they provide thrust more in keeping with this Cadillac's athletic personality. Although enthusiasts may lament the lack of a manual transmission for the V6, the six-speed automatic is hard to fault. Switched to Sport mode, this automatic knows just when to hold a gear and provides smooth, rev-matched downshifts right on time, every time.

Even with its sporting calibration, the Cadillac ATS takes neglected city streets in stride, absorbing the shock of potholes and broken pavement without upsetting the car or its occupants. As a result, the compact Cadillac makes for a fine daily driver that can also provide plenty of entertainment on a Sunday morning drive.

What Others Are Saying

Customer Reviews

Average Consumer Rating (See all 31 reviews) Write a Review

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Tis thing is a blast to drive

by on
Vehicle: 2013 Cadillac ATS

The ATS is really a fun to drive car. With the V6 it has plenty of power and with the trans in manual mode you can really wind it up through the gears. Handling is great, it really holds the road. I don't know why it is that GM puts summer only tires it sells in the north east. I had to replace them not long after I got it with all season, an extra expense. The one thing that I don't like about the car is the touch screen controls. You can't work the radio or climate controls by feel, you have to take your eyes off the road to make sure you hit the touch screen just right and sometimes that isn't easy. Over all I like the car and am enjoying it but I would say that it is not anything for a little old lady or anyone wanting a real cushy ride.



5 of 5 people found this review helpful

Great entry luxury sedan

by on
Vehicle: 2013 Cadillac ATS

I am definitely on board with the Cadillac brand after this purchase. I have had the car for almost four months and loving every second of it. This car handles surprising well, even in rain I dont have to change the way I drive. Interior is great for the price tag. I can't say anything about the cue system, as mine does not have it, but I just connect my iPod to the USB port and leave it. So getting the touchscreen didn't appeal to me. The 2.0t engine is great. Having almost no turbo lag is great for hooning around backstreets. Transmission sometimes gets confused on when to shift when pushing the car hard, but manual shift gets rid of that. If your in the market for a4s or BMW 3 series but are slightly to expensive,this car used is a great choice and beats out the europeans cars if you ask me.



2 of 7 people found this review helpful

Awesome car

by on
Vehicle: 2013 Cadillac ATS



28 of 31 people found this review helpful

The american standard of luxury not here.

by on
Vehicle: 2013 Cadillac ATS

I leased a 2013 Cadillac ATS 4 door Sedan turbo, The car has been nothing but problems from the start. We are talking about the American standard for luxury vehicles, obviously this car is not. I am not going to completely trash the car because it does have some good points such as the handling, acceleration, interior looks as well as an appealing exterior, definitely a great looking vehicle. But the CUE system is inoperable while driving for fear of getting too distracted or frustrated and getting into an accident. The radio is useless it's always acquiring the HD signal so it sounds terrible, every once in a while it loses all the pre-set stations. I had front end problems since the begining of my lease, the car is in the shop every few months for different problems, already had about 7 recalls, There is absolutely no pleasure in driving this car. As I write this it is in the shop for noise vibrations on engine and rear. They called me and told me that there were loose screws on engine/door as far as the back vibration is concerned they said that all 4 rims are bent due to the potholes on roads. Now this definitely doesn't sound right, I can understand one rim possibly getting bent/damaged but not all four of them this leads me to believe that there is an apparent design/structural fault or that the materials used are too weak to support the weight of the vehicle. I have owned/leased well over 15 different vehicles during my life and never had a problem where I was told that the rims were bent/damaged. This ATS has been nothing but headaches since we got it and I must say that the dealership has been no help. When I last contacted the owner of the dealership he told me that I should call Cadillac/GMC directly and complain to them so let me get this straight you buy the car and after that they are done with you so now when you have a complaint or problem you have to contact the manufacturer yourself. What is the point in buying from a dealership when they are not there to help you, we may as well be allowed to buy directly from the manufacturer since ultimately they are the ones that you have to deal with. Lastly I must say that my experience with this vehicle has been nothing but frustrating and overall unpleasant, what is the point of having a car that you have absolutely no joy or pleasure in driving. I would be willing to possibly understand having so many problems if the car was used but for a brand new car it does not appear to be reasonable and at this point the car only has 27,000 miles practically still pretty new.



22 of 26 people found this review helpful

Cadillac and crap start with "c"

by on
Vehicle: 2013 Cadillac ATS

GM stands behind their dealers, so the dealer takes the bullet. Purchased 2013 ATS, car is in shop on average of once every 8 weeks. 13+ items had to be fixed in 2 years. GM no longer has extended warranty, and they will not pay for extended warranty. GM will take NO RESPONSIBILITY for the poor quality. List of items and how many times they had to be fixed: QUE 4 times Sunroof 3 times Sterling wheel 2 times Drivers seat 2 times



7 of 9 people found this review helpful

2.0t 6a after 20k miles bought cpo at 8k miles

by on
Vehicle: 2013 Cadillac ATS

I bought the ATS 2.0T as a CPO from a local dealer. I paid 25K and I love the car. I always put in 92+ octane and have never gotten less than 25 mpg (miles driven/gallons pumped at empty- not cue's take on the same). The handling of this car is as car&driver and all other magazines have stated - Second to none in it's class. You feel connected to the road in a car that isn't a bloated overweight numb steering overpriced import. The trans does need work however, but in sport mode I have only minor complaints. I also have had zero problems since I bought it, and I now have 20K miles. Bottom line - If you're looking for a GREAT chassis, with sweet steering feel and acceleration take a test drive. I cross tested Audi A4, 3 series all the usual and the caddy fit my needs and likes much better than the others.



Talk About The 2013 ATS

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Gas Mileage

EPA-Rated MPG

  • 19
  • cty
/
  • 28
  • highway
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