2017 Tesla Model 3 Long-Term Road Test - Comfort

2017 Tesla Model 3 Long-Term Road Test

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2017 Tesla Model 3: Stopping Distance and Grip With 18- and 19-inch Tires

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing

2017 Tesla Model 3

You've probably heard the recent news that Consumer Reports tested its Tesla Model 3 and proclaimed it severely lacking in the brake department. This was based in large part on a 152-foot result it reported after conducting a series of 60-0 mph panic stops. We don't know the ins and outs of CR's test procedure or the condition and texture of the asphalt at its test facility in Connecticut. What we do know is that, like us, Consumer Reports privately bought its test car; it's no press loaner. Its car also has the standard 18-inch wheels and tires that we bought.

CR's ghastly result was a big surprise to us. We recorded a fairly normal 60-0 mph panic-stop distance of 133 feet when we tested our 2017 Tesla Model 3 on our own test track. While our result is perhaps a few feet longer than we typically see on mass-market cars with all-season tires, it's fairly typical of hybrids and electric vehicles fitted with low-rolling-resistance tires designed for maximum range and efficiency. Mildly disappointing, but not headline-worthy.

Our testing program does not stop at braking, if you'll pardon the pun. Our Tesla Model 3 accelerated to 60 mph in 5.3 seconds, and it produced a respectable 0.85g of grip when orbiting our skidpad. We also feel out a car's handling by lapping it around our test track, and here the Model 3's front end displayed mediocre grip when entering corners, followed by subtle yet persistent traction control interventions on the way out.

This wasn't viewed as a huge liability, though, because a) it's natural to push a car harder on a closed track and b) no one — myself included — thought ill of the Model 3's brakes or handling after driving it on their favorite mountain road.

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2017 Tesla Model 3: Monthly Update for April 2018

by Travis Langness, Staff Writer

2017 Tesla Model 3

Where Did We Drive It?
Where we drove our long-term 2017 Tesla Model 3 in April is a bit less relevant than what happened while we were driving it. We did local commuting and a few freeway journeys, sure, but everywhere we went the car was fraught with problems. Sixteen weeks into ownership, we've had so many issues with our Model 3 that we started a shared Google Doc to catalog various warning messages, necessary screen resets and general failures.

Forget that this is a "cutting-edge" EV with a cult following. That's irrelevant if Tesla wants to be anything more than a footnote in automotive history. Our Model 3 cost us $56,000, and by that standard alone, the ownership experience so far has been unacceptable. But this is no ordinary $56K car. We put down a $1,000 deposit to get on a two-year waiting list for this car and it's falling apart.

Early adopters who could spend six figures on a car such as the Model S might've given Tesla a bit of extra leeway. Maybe they figure it's a small price to pay for such a technologically advanced car. Maybe it's a sacrifice they're willing to make to avoid using fossil fuels and get free access to the carpool lane. This far into its run, though, and with a car intended for mass appeal, Tesla should have the bugs worked out. It clearly doesn't.

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2017 Tesla Model 3: Monthly Update for February 2018

by Jason Kavanagh, Senior Road Test Engineer

2017 Tesla Model 3

Where Did We Drive It?
February represents the first full month that we've owned and driven our long-term 2017 Tesla Model 3. We took delivery of it during the first week of January.

Beyond commuting between Orange County and our Santa Monica office throughout the month, our lozenge-shaped EV made a trek to Borrego Springs, California, to deliver some crappy car parts. It also took part in a comparison test that entailed a good chunk of miles. Mum's the word for now because we don't want to spoil the surprise, but we think you'll be interested in our findings. Stay tuned.

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2017 Tesla Model 3: Introduction

by Ronald Montoya, Senior Consumer Advice Editor

2017 Tesla Model 3

When we last left off in the 2017 Tesla Model 3 ordering process on December 20, 2017, I thought we'd be waiting four weeks for our car to be ready. But things went faster than anticipated. Before we get to the car's official introduction details, here's the rest of its order and delivery backstory.

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2017 Tesla Model 3: Pre-Introduction

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing

2017 Tesla Model 3

The Buying Process Has Begun
We're doing something different. We have not yet taken delivery of what will be a 2017 Tesla Model 3 sedan, but the pre-ownership experience has just passed a critical milestone and we thought you'd want to follow along. As you can see, we have recently received an invitation to configure our Tesla Model 3 and begin the actual buying process.

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Past Long-Term Road Tests