2021 Honda Odyssey

MSRP range: $31,790 - $47,820
(21)
MSRP$32,965
Edmunds suggests you pay$30,595

What Should I Pay
22 for sale near you

2021 Honda Odyssey Review

  • Configurable second-row seats are very useful
  • Packed with modern safety and tech features
  • Strong V6 engine and stable handling make it enjoyable to drive
  • Mediocre fuel economy
  • No power-folding third-row seats
  • Overly vigilant forward collision warning system is frustrating
  • Mild styling update
  • Lightly refreshed interior
  • Honda Sensing suite of driving aids now standard
  • Part of the fifth Odyssey generation introduced for 2018

Your choices are relatively limited if you're in the market for a minivan. Luckily for you, the 2021 Honda Odyssey is so much better than the rest that your search can start and end here. The Odyssey does all the minivan stuff well — there's plenty of passenger and cargo room, and its V6 has plenty of sauce to move this eight-passenger vehicle with authority.

We're also impressed with the amount of technology present. The upper trim levels feature a vacuum cleaner hidden in the cargo area, an intercom system so you can speak to passengers without raising your voice, and an interior camera system, which is handy for keeping an eye on rowdy backseat passengers.

The 2021 model year brings mild upgrades to the Odyssey. Honda restyled the grille to mimic those on the Pilot SUV and Ridgeline pickup truck. The Honda Sensing suite of active safety features and driving aids is now standard on all models. The interior also reflects mild upgrades, including perforated leather upholstery with contrast stitching and piping on the Elite model. These small revisions only help cement the Odyssey's status as the preeminent minivan in the class.

EdmundsEdmunds' Expert Rating
Rated for you by America’s best test team
Some cringe at the thought of owning and driving a minivan. But you can't deny that this is the most efficient way to move people and cargo in just about any setting. And among minivans, the Honda Odyssey does it the best. It offers nimble handling, modern technology, gobs of interior space, and pleasing levels of luxury and convenience.
The Odyssey just might be the exception where it is OK to use the words "minivan" and "fun" in the same sentence. Its V6 engine offers enough power for your merging and passing needs even when you've got the cabin full of passengers. In our testing, the Odyssey Elite accelerated from 0 to 60 mph in 7.6 seconds, essentially an average time for a V6-powered minivan.

Precise steering and stable braking and handling give the Odyssey a confident presence both on the highway and along tighter roads. Is the Odyssey sporty? Not really. But it is well sorted and enjoyable to drive. Everything feels cohesive.

A smooth-shifting 10-speed automatic transmission unobtrusively chooses the proper gear for the situation. Standard steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters are nice if you want to shift for yourself. If we had to nitpick, it'd be that the engine stop-start system (it turns the engine off at stoplights to save fuel) is a bit unrefined, but it can be disabled.
The Odyssey is slightly ahead of its peers in yet another area. The front seats are great for logging miles on extended drives. The second-row seats are equally suited for kids or adults. Third-row legroom is limited, but two grown-ups can survive back there for shorter distances. Our Odyssey Elite's 19-inch wheels likely gave it a firmer ride than the smaller available wheel options (smaller wheels mean more absorbent tire sidewalls). But generally speaking, there aren't many bumps the Honda can't absorb with ease.

Honda deserves credit for its noise-reduction efforts, and the Odyssey is the quietest minivan in the segment by our measurements. The available cabin intercom also lets you bypass the low-level road noise. A microphone picks up your voice and broadcasts it to the rear of the van via the speakers or through the rear entertainment system's headsets. Now you can say "Stop touching your sister!" without having to turn your head around to shout it.
A minivan should make your life easier, and the Odyssey does. Sliding rear doors will always beat the traditional doors of a crossover SUV when it comes to getting kids in and out. The height of the first two rows of seats makes them easy to slide right into. The second-row seats recline and also slide sideways with only moderate effort, allowing superior access to the third row.

Both the driver's seat and the steering column offer a wide range of adjustment, and finding a natural driving position is a cinch. Those with longer legs, however, might wish for extended thigh support from the lower cushion. Our biggest gripe is the mediocre visibility up front and over the shoulder. The windshield roof pillars and side mirrors are bulky. And while the rearview cameras are nice, a surround-view camera would be optimal. Honda doesn't offer one.
Honda's infotainment system has big virtual buttons and snappy responses. You can customize the layout of the screen's virtual buttons. The Garmin-based navigation graphics and menus, though, seem archaic compared to newer systems. And some operations, including voice commands, are a little hard to figure out. We preferred to use Apple CarPlay and Android Auto apps instead during our testing.

The tech in the Odyssey is hit-and-miss. The rear cabin camera monitor (in lieu of the sunglass mirror) and cabin intercom are certainly useful. But some of the advanced driver aids, such as adaptive cruise control, respond sluggishly and are prone to false positives. We avoided using them.
Few vehicles can best a minivan here. The storage well behind the third row is deep and perfect for grocery bags. The third-row seats are lifted and lowered manually, which requires a little muscle, but the strap handle system is easy enough to use. The Odyssey has a larger max capacity, at 155.8 cubic feet, than both the Sienna and the Pacifica. The second-row seats are bulky and hard to remove, yet their side-to-side adjustability is a helpful storage solution if you don't need a fully flat floor.

When it comes to installing car seats, the Odyssey sets the bar. Not only are the lower car-seat anchors extremely accessible, but booster-age kids will also find it easy to put on their own belts.
The EPA estimates the Odyssey Elite's fuel economy at 22 mpg in combined city/highway driving, which is average for a minivan. On our 115-mile evaluation route, which is primarily composed of highway driving, we observed 21 mpg. This indicates the Odyssey might underperform with respect to the EPA's estimates.
The Odyssey Elite trim level that we tested is pricey, no question. But the fundamentals of the Odyssey are available for much less if you can live without tech features such as active noise cancellation or a rear-seat vacuum cleaner. If you simply need maximum people-moving space, even the base LX captures the Odyssey's best qualities: smooth power, comfortable seating and an open, airy cabin.

Warranty-wise, Honda is on par with competitors — most offer three years/36,000 miles of basic and five years/60,000 miles of powertrain coverage. Roadside assistance is also typical and provided for the length of the basic warranty.
As a kid-mobile, the versatility of a minivan is unbeatable. As road trip transport for five or six adults, the Odyssey is nearly as accommodating. And for the weekend home improvement warrior, it's a cavernous, lockable space for all your stuff. Not convinced it's cool? This one also drives like a car and has flexible seating, USB ports galore and in-cabin tech to keep everyone entertained.

Which Odyssey does Edmunds recommend?

Consider going with the EX. It gets you plenty of useful features at an affordable price. Its tri-zone climate control, additional middle-row seat, blind-spot monitor and smartphone integration systems (among many other features) are well worth the extra cost over the base LX. The special features found on the Touring and Elite, such as the integrated vacuum cleaner and a rear intercom system, make family life easier, but they're certainly not essential.

Honda Odyssey models

The 2021 Odyssey is a family-friendly minivan available in five trim levels: LX, EX, EX-L, Touring and Elite. All are powered by a 3.5-liter V6 (280 horsepower, 262 lb-ft of torque) powering the front wheels via a 10-speed automatic transmission. The LX comes with second-row captain's chairs, allowing seating for seven. All others come installed with a removable middle seat to increase capacity to eight.

LX
The base LX model starts you off with:

  • LED headlights
  • 18-inch alloy wheels
  • Push-button ignition
  • Automatic climate control
  • Power-adjustable front seats
  • 5-inch central display screen
  • Seven-speaker audio system
  • Rear-seat reminder (alerts you as a reminder to check the rear seats for occupants when you park the car)

Every Odyssey also comes with:

  • Forward collision mitigation (warns you of an impending collision and applies the brakes in certain scenarios)
  • Lane departure mitigation (warns you of a lane departure when a turn signal isn't used and can automatically steer to maintain lane position)
  • Adaptive cruise control (maintains a driver-set distance between the Honda and the car in front)

EX
The EX upgrades the Odyssey with:

  • Dynamic guidelines for the rearview camera
  • Heated mirrors
  • Remote engine start
  • Keyless entry
  • Power-sliding rear doors
  • Tri-zone automatic climate control
  • Lumbar adjustment for the driver seat
  • Heated front seats
  • Second-row bench seat
  • Second-row sunshades

The EX also comes with:

  • 8-inch touchscreen
  • Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility
  • Satellite radio
  • Blind-spot monitor (alerts you if a vehicle in the next lane over is in your blind spot)
  • Rear cross-traffic alert (warns you if a vehicle behind you is about to cross your vehicle's path while in reverse)

EX-L
Upgrades on the midtier EX-L model include:

  • Sound-reducing windshield
  • Sunroof
  • Power liftgate
  • Auto-dimming rearview mirror
  • Driver-seat memory settings
  • Leather-wrapped steering wheel
  • Additional adjustments for front passenger seat, including lumbar
  • Second-row USB charging ports

Touring
The Touring model ups the feature content significantly, with additions that include:

  • 19-inch wheels
  • Ambient interior lighting
  • Third-row sunshades
  • Third-row USB charging port
  • Integrated navigation system
  • Onboard Wi-Fi hotspot
  • Rear-seat entertainment system with wireless headphones
  • In-headphone cabin intercom system
  • CabinWatch rear-cabin camera monitoring system
  • Front and rear parking sensors (alert you to obstacles that may not be visible behind or in front of the vehicle when parking)

Elite
The range-topping Elite is fully equipped with:

  • Automatic wipers
  • Auto-dimming side mirrors
  • Sound-reducing front and rear window glass
  • Hands-free tailgate
  • Heated steering wheel
  • Ventilated front seats
  • Wireless charging pad
  • Intercom system
  • Integrated vacuum cleaner
  • Premium 11-speaker audio system
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Consumer reviews

Read what other owners think about the 2021 Honda Odyssey.

Average user rating: 4.0 stars
21 total reviews
5 star reviews: 57%
4 star reviews: 19%
3 star reviews: 5%
2 star reviews: 0%
1 star reviews: 19%

Trending topics in reviews

  • interior
  • driving experience
  • safety
  • comfort
  • doors
  • maintenance & parts
  • infotainment system
  • visibility
  • ride quality
  • cup holders
  • value
  • road noise
  • reliability & manufacturing quality
  • wheels & tires
  • handling & steering
  • sound system
  • steering wheel
  • acceleration
  • technology
  • lights
  • seats
  • off-roading
  • appearance

Most helpful consumer reviews

1/5 stars, Creaking like a rocking chair
Sarah M,
Touring 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A)
Bought our new 2021 Odyssey Elite last month, immediately began hearing creaking noises S if the floor board and steering wheel was going to fall out. Notified salesman immediately and took it back in to service department. 4 hours of waiting and was told “it just needs to be broken in”. We all know a new car doesn’t need to be broken in to get rid of broken noises. Went to corporate and got them to get me an appointment in body shop. I have bought Honda exclusively since 1989, been on a new Odyssey every 2 years since 2006. Our 2018 had electrical problems and computer problems. This is the last Honda we will ever buy.
1/5 stars, Big mistake
Frank,
Elite 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A)
Bought a 2021 Honda Odyssey elite few weeks ago and it’s been nothing but a nightmare from day one. We only had a car for a week and since than it’s been at the dealer for electronic problems. Everything shut down every two minutes, radio, DVD player, back up camera, phone charger, blue tooth nothing works. Honda doesn’t know what’s wrong with the car or how to fix it. Just found out that they are having a same problem since 2018 and they have done nothing to correct the problem. We have a loaner from the dealer which is a 2020 Honda Odyssey EXL and it has the same problem. I had a 2012 odyssey and never had any issues with that car. I can’t believe that Honda is selling defective cars for three years and are no fixing the problem. I guess this is our last Honda bow, time to move to Toyota.
5/5 stars, New and improved
Stone314,
EX-L 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A)
Just leased my 6th Honda Odyssey minivan and I am so much happier with the 2021 than my previous 2018. I experienced hesitation and lag time when trying to accelerate in the 2018. The new 2021 has none of that and provides a much smoother ride. I am extremely pleased with my new 2021 Honda Odyssey.
4/5 stars, Texas Senior Buyer
Texas Senior,
EX-L 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A)
A very enjoyable vehicle to drive except for the really annoying road noise which is a common feature in the Odyssey.

2021 Honda Odyssey video

[MUSIC PLAYING] MARK TAKASHASHI: Minivans-- whether you love them or hate them, there's no denying that they're some of the best vehicles for transporting the family and all of their stuff. One of the latest minivans to get a full redesign is that, over my shoulder, the all-new 2021 Toyota Sienna. And it's joined today by the Honda Odyssey, which also gets some updates for 2021. We're going to get into what's cool, what's new, and what needs improvement over the course of this video. I'll be talking about the high level stuff, but I'm probably not the best reviewer for the real world usability stuff, which is why we're bringing in Mike, our vehicle testing operations manager and parent of two. As always, hit the Subscribe button below to see all of our latest videos. Head on over to edmunds.com for all your car shopping needs, and get a cash offer for your vehicle by going to edmonds.com/sellmycar. Now that we have these Minivans together, let's see how they stack up at least on paper. The 2021 Sienna starts right around $35,000 and tops out at $51,000 for this Platinum trim. Meanwhile, the Honda starts right around $33,000 and tops out with this Elite trim right around $49,000. Advantage? Honda. The previous Sienna's 296-horsepower V6 has been replaced by a 2.5 liter, four-cylinder hybrid system with a combined output of 245 horsepower. That power reduction is a bit of a let down, but it's not nearly as concerning as the decision to go with a continuously variable transmission. Those CVTs have a tendency to dull the engine's responsiveness, making the vehicle feel weak and slow. The Odyssey keeps its 280-horsepower 3.5 liter V6, as well as it's traditional 10-speed automatic transmission. Advantage? Honda. The Toyota's hybrid system reaps huge benefits at the gas pump though with an EPA estimated 36 miles per gallon combined. On our highway-heavy evaluation loop, the Odyssey met its estimate, while the Sienna exceeded expectations with 44.8 mpg. That's a huge advantage over the Odyssey's 22 mpg combined estimate, and I think that deserves two stars. The Odyssey has a cargo capacity that ranges from 32.8 to 144.9 cubic feet, compared to the Sienna's 33.5 to 101 cubic feet, which is so small. Because unlike the Honda, you can't remove the second row. Advantage? Honda. [MUSIC PLAYING] In less objective comparisons, let's talk about styling. It's not easy dressing up a big box on wheels, so I'll try to go easy. In design school, I was taught to always start a critique by saying something nice first. So here it goes. I like the Sienna's new profile more than his predecessor mainly because there's more of a hood here that helped it look a little less like a minivan from the front. Unfortunately, the Sienna has two of my least favorite Toyota styling cues. It may look less like a minivan up front, but it looks like a Camry or Avalon with this ridiculously sized grill. And then, oh, my god, there's this character that starts here and goes over the back just like the Supra and Highlander. And to me, it's really ungainly. It looks almost like someone's wearing two Fanny packs at the same time. Seriously, they could have done a little better with the styling. The Odyssey gets a styling refresh for 2021, and it's most noticeable upfront front the grill. It's much cleaner and simpler than last year, which had kind of a big chunky chrome thing going on. Further down the side, however, we have these kind of surface treatment that do their best to break up the monotony. But to me, it sort of reminds me of a molded fiberglass hot tub. Returning is this chrome strip here that dips down with the window, as well as the floating roof. I do like how both minivans hide the door rail right here in the glass. Overall, I think the Honda is easier on the eyes. That said, the Chrysler Pacifica gets a major refresh too, and I think it looks the best of the three with a more aggressive SUV-like appearance. Well, that's the end of my usefulness on this video. So it's time to throw it on over to Mike Schmidt. MIKE SCHMIDT: [INHALE] Suburbia. The roofers. The barking dogs. My rambunctious kids. I got roped into this video today because, whether I want to admit it or not, I live a minivan kind of life. My kids are still in boosters. I like doing projects on the weekends, and our family loves taking long road trips. With the space of these minivans, you can't beat them. To pick a winner between the Odyssey and the Sienna, first we're going to look at what they do the same. Then we're going to look at what they do differently. Then we're going to get my kids' take on it. At this point in minivan evolution, the manufacturers have figured out all the basics. The Sienna and the Odyssey are Prime examples of that. I'll show you starting with the backs of the cars. Both of them have hands-free opening for the rear hatch. Now personally, it doesn't work for me. I think it's unnecessary. I don't feel like dancing a jig to open the rear hatch. Each van has a deep storage well behind the third row seat. When you're not using it, you can fold those seats down into it. Now, the real disappointment here-- both the top trim Odyssey and the top trim Sienna have manual folding seats. I want that automated life. It's worth mentioning that the Chrysler Pacifica has push button controls to lower the seat. Access to the third row is snug whether you're a capital or lower case person. Each van has its own way of granting access to this kid zone, and I'll get back to that a little bit later. Ah, the second row. Both of these vans offer optional bench seats so that you can fit three across. In the case of this Sienna, we have just the two captain's chairs. Now we're in the front row where the magic happens. Both the Odyssey and the Sienna have very comfortable driver's seats. I've spent an hour or two straight in each one of them, and I have no complaints. I can hook up my phone and use Apple CarPlay or Android Auto. Or I can unplug and use the native apps. But each one of the vans does it just a little bit differently, and I'll talk about that more later. CabinTalk is Honda's name for a feature that projects the front passenger's voice to the rear passengers by using either the speakers or the headsets. Toyota has a similar feature called Driver Easy Speak. But because our test van isn't equipped with that, we're here in the Odyssey. This feature is helpful because cabins get loud with road noise, screaming kids. Being able to say things like, kids, we're almost there, allows me to save my dad voice for when I really need it. Hey, stop hitting your brother. Finally, these vans have a lot of extras. Driver aides like lane keeping assist, and adaptive cruise control, easy access to latch anchors for child seats, seat belts-- kids can easily buckle themselves-- big storage areas near the driver, hooks for bags, 12-volt outlets, USB ports, cup holders galore, and even vacuums. With all of the similarities between the Odyssey and the Sienna, it may seem like this test is a draw. When actually it's the fine tuning of the little features that really enhance the experience and will ultimately decide our winner. Let's look at the differences in both vans, but this time we'll start from the front and work our way back. The use of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto make native apps feel obsolete. If you prefer not to plug-in your phone, know that in the Odyssey the Garmin-based navigation system is pretty awkward. The Sienna is much better. Both vans have the classic fold down bubble mirror for monitoring passengers in the back, but the Odyssey takes it up a notch. Honda calls it CabinWatch, and it's essentially a camera version of the bubble mirror that allows me to keep tabs on any mutinous behavior in the backseat. And it works daytime and nighttime. Both vans also use rear view cameras to give you a better idea of what's going on outside. Here, the Sienna really steps it up. The Sienna offers a camera that gives a 360-degree view around the car. Toyota calls it Bird's Eye View with Perimeter Scan. At the press of a button, you can get extra piece of mind. Toyota's second row slides front to back. You just flip the switch, and push on back. Now in the case of this Sienna, it has the optional ottomans. You get a little foot rest. Now in my case, it's too short for me anyway, even if I recline it. But the kids will like it. You want to see something really cool? The Sienna has an optional fridge. Oh. Honda's seats slide side to side. With just a little bit of umph, you can move them to the center, or you can slide them off to the side if you want to carry long cargo or if the kids are just getting on each other's nerves. So how did these vans drive? When it comes to passing and merging, you're going to find you have plenty of power regardless which van you're in. The Odyssey is going to give you more of a traditional driving experience. The Sienna is going to take a little bit more getting used to. The reason is because it's CVT and engine combination can be really loud when the engine's under strain. That could be when you're going up a hill, and it could be when you're trying to speed up onto the freeway. Also, the brakes-- they take a little getting used to. I found that they can either be too grabby at times or not as grabby as I'd want them to be. Minivans are so similar these days that in order to be the best, you have to do all the little things right. It's been a long time since these two vans have been so evenly matched. We'll take the Sienna first. It's going to win the fuel economy battle no matter what. But I found that it's floaty ride, non-removable second row, and it's inconsistent driveability was really a put off. And to be honest, that was enough. Then there's the Odyssey. Its navigation system is outdated, but it does all the other things right. It makes it easy to drive and "easy" is the key word here. Because as you can tell by the mustache, I'm a dad. I have enough other things to deal with. Easy is what I want. Based on that, the Odyssey wins for me. [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER 1: We're in the Honda Odyssey. SPEAKER 2: I like it because it has a TV. SPEAKER 1: I like the arm rests, the cool automatic door. SPEAKER 2: I don't really like that there's not TVs on the back of the chair. SPEAKER 1: We both up to share one TV. SPEAKER 2: Yeah. SPEAKER 1: And there-- and there's only one game. There's hardly any games on the-- SPEAKER 2: And we can't like-- SPEAKER 1: --TV. SPEAKER 2: --play play against each other. TOGETHER: We're in the Toyota Sienna. SPEAKER 2: I like it because you can control the air conditioning back here, and it has a fridge. But I don't like it because it has skinnier arm rests. SPEAKER 1: I do not like it because it does not have any TVs. SPEAKER 2: I don't like it because you can't like, you can't just click the button right up here to like get the door to close. MIKE SCHMIDT: So which one do you like better? SPEAKER 1: Hmm, I think the Odyssey. MIKE SCHMIDT: Why? SPEAKER 1: Because of the TV.

2021 Honda Odyssey vs. Honda Odyssey — Minivan Comparison: Who Has the Best Family Vehicle?

Features & Specs

Base MSRP
$31,790
MPG & Fuel
19 City / 28 Hwy / 22 Combined
Fuel Tank Capacity: 19.5 gal. capacity
Seating
7 seats
Drivetrain
Type: front wheel drive
Transmission: 10-speed shiftable automatic
Engine
V6 cylinder
Horsepower: 280 hp @ 6000 rpm
Torque: 262 lb-ft @ 4700 rpm
Basic Warranty
3 yr./ 36000 mi.
Dimensions
Length: 205.2 in. / Height: 68.3 in. / Width: 78.5 in.
Curb Weight: 4398 lbs.
Cargo Capacity, All Seats In Place: 38.6 cu.ft.
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At a Glance:
  • 6 Colors
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  • $32,090starting MSRP

Safety

Our experts’ favorite Odyssey safety features:

Lane Keeping Assist System
Informs you if you start to drift out of your lane and can help steer you back. Standard on the EX and above.
Collision Mitigation Braking System
Monitors what's ahead of you, warns about potential collisions and can automatically apply the brakes. Also standard on the EX and above.
HondaLink
Bundles various telematic features such as roadside assistance and automatic collision notification. Standard on the EX and above.

NHTSA Overall Rating 5 out of 5 stars

The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration offers independent analysis.

Frontal Barrier Crash RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Driver5 / 5
Passenger5 / 5
Side Crash RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Side Barrier RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Driver5 / 5
Passenger5 / 5
Combined Side Barrier & Pole RatingsRating
Front Seat5 / 5
Back Seat5 / 5
RolloverRating
Rollover4 / 5
Dynamic Test ResultNo Tip
Risk Of Rollover13.6%

IIHS Rating

The Insurance Institute of Highway Safety uses extensive crash tests to determine car safety.

Side Impact Test
Good
Roof Strength Test
Good
Rear Crash Protection / Head Restraint
Good
IIHS Small Overlap Front TestNot Tested
Moderate Overlap Front Test
Good


Honda Odyssey vs. the competition

2021 Honda Odyssey

2021 Honda Odyssey

2020 Toyota Sienna

2020 Toyota Sienna

Honda Odyssey vs. Toyota Sienna

The Odyssey's No. 1 rival is fully redesigned for 2021. The new Toyota Sienna will feature a four-cylinder hybrid powertrain, which should earn it best-in-class fuel economy. Also look out for the Sinna's robust features list, which includes niceties not found on the Odyssey, such as a surround-view camera system, a digital rearview mirror and an onboard refrigerated compartment.

Compare Honda Odyssey & Toyota Sienna features 

Honda Odyssey vs. Chrysler Pacifica

The Odyssey is a little more enjoyable behind the wheel than the Chrysler Pacifica, but otherwise these two minivans are closely matched. The Pacifica has an attractive interior, and its infotainment system is among the best on the market. The Pacifica also features second-row seats that easily fold into the floor for a completely flat cargo space. It's also the only minivan available in a plug-in hybrid variant.

Compare Honda Odyssey & Chrysler Pacifica features 

Honda Odyssey vs. Kia Sedona

While the Odyssey and the Kia Sedona have similar features on their entry-level models, a fully loaded Sedona is going to be much less expensive overall. That said, the Sedona gives up a lot to the Odyssey in terms of ride quality and vehicle dynamics. Look for the next-generation Sedona — due for the 2022 model year — to possibly shift the tide.

Compare Honda Odyssey & Kia Sedona features 

FAQ

Is the Honda Odyssey a good car?

The Edmunds experts tested the 2021 Odyssey both on the road and at the track, giving it a 8.1 out of 10. You probably care about Honda Odyssey fuel economy, so it's important to know that the Odyssey gets an EPA-estimated 22 mpg. What about cargo capacity? When you're thinking about carrying stuff in your new car, keep in mind that the Odyssey has 38.6 cubic feet of trunk space. And then there's safety and reliability. Edmunds has all the latest NHTSA and IIHS crash-test scores, plus industry-leading expert and consumer reviews to help you understand what it's like to own and maintain a Honda Odyssey. Learn more

What's new in the 2021 Honda Odyssey?

According to Edmunds’ car experts, here’s what’s new for the 2021 Honda Odyssey:

  • Mild styling update
  • Lightly refreshed interior
  • Honda Sensing suite of driving aids now standard
  • Part of the fifth Odyssey generation introduced for 2018
Learn more

Is the Honda Odyssey reliable?

To determine whether the Honda Odyssey is reliable, read Edmunds' authentic consumer reviews, which come from real owners and reveal what it's like to live with the Odyssey. Look for specific complaints that keep popping up in the reviews, and be sure to compare the Odyssey's average consumer rating to that of competing vehicles. Learn more

Is the 2021 Honda Odyssey a good car?

There's a lot to consider if you're wondering whether the 2021 Honda Odyssey is a good car. Edmunds' expert testing team reviewed the 2021 Odyssey and gave it a 8.1 out of 10. Safety scores, fuel economy, cargo capacity and feature availability should all be factors in determining whether the 2021 Odyssey is a good car for you. Learn more

How much should I pay for a 2021 Honda Odyssey?

The least-expensive 2021 Honda Odyssey is the 2021 Honda Odyssey LX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A). Including destination charge, it arrives with a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of about $31,790.

Other versions include:

  • EX-L 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) which starts at $38,460
  • Touring 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) which starts at $42,500
  • Elite 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) which starts at $47,820
  • EX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) which starts at $35,190
  • LX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) which starts at $31,790
Learn more

What are the different models of Honda Odyssey?

If you're interested in the Honda Odyssey, the next question is, which Odyssey model is right for you? Odyssey variants include EX-L 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A), Touring 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A), Elite 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A), and EX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A). For a full list of Odyssey models, check out Edmunds’ Features & Specs page. Learn more

More about the 2021 Honda Odyssey

2021 Honda Odyssey Overview

The 2021 Honda Odyssey is offered in the following submodels: Odyssey Minivan. Available styles include EX-L 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A), Touring 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A), Elite 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A), EX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A), and LX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A).

What do people think of the 2021 Honda Odyssey?

Consumer ratings and reviews are also available for the 2021 Honda Odyssey and all its trim types. Overall, Edmunds users rate the 2021 Odyssey 4.0 on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. Edmunds consumer reviews allow users to sift through aggregated consumer reviews to understand what other drivers are saying about any vehicle in our database. Detailed rating breakdowns (including performance, comfort, value, interior, exterior design, build quality, and reliability) are available as well to provide shoppers with a comprehensive understanding of why customers like the 2021 Odyssey.

Edmunds Expert Reviews

Edmunds experts have compiled a robust series of ratings and reviews for the 2021 Honda Odyssey and all model years in our database. Our rich content includes expert reviews and recommendations for the 2021 Odyssey featuring deep dives into trim levels and features, performance, mpg, safety, interior, and driving. Edmunds also offers expert ratings, road test and performance data, long-term road tests, first-drive reviews, video reviews and more.

Our Review Process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.

What's a good price for a New 2021 Honda Odyssey?

2021 Honda Odyssey LX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A)

The 2021 Honda Odyssey LX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $32,965. The average price paid for a new 2021 Honda Odyssey LX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) is trending $2,370 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $2,370 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $30,595.

The average savings for the 2021 Honda Odyssey LX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) is 7.2% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 22 2021 Honda Odyssey LX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Honda Odyssey EX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A)

The 2021 Honda Odyssey EX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $36,365. The average price paid for a new 2021 Honda Odyssey EX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) is trending $2,439 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $2,439 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $33,926.

The average savings for the 2021 Honda Odyssey EX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) is 6.7% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 13 2021 Honda Odyssey EX 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Honda Odyssey EX-L 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A)

The 2021 Honda Odyssey EX-L 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $39,635. The average price paid for a new 2021 Honda Odyssey EX-L 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) is trending $3,111 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,111 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $36,524.

The average savings for the 2021 Honda Odyssey EX-L 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) is 7.8% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 26 2021 Honda Odyssey EX-L 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Honda Odyssey Touring 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A)

The 2021 Honda Odyssey Touring 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $43,675. The average price paid for a new 2021 Honda Odyssey Touring 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) is trending $3,842 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,842 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $39,833.

The average savings for the 2021 Honda Odyssey Touring 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) is 8.8% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 20 2021 Honda Odyssey Touring 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Honda Odyssey Elite 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A)

The 2021 Honda Odyssey Elite 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $48,995. The average price paid for a new 2021 Honda Odyssey Elite 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) is trending $4,024 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $4,024 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $44,971.

The average savings for the 2021 Honda Odyssey Elite 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) is 8.2% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 4 2021 Honda Odyssey Elite 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 10A) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

Which 2021 Honda Odysseys are available in my area?

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2021 Honda Odyssey for sale near. There are currently 63 new 2021 Odysseys listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $32,910 and mileage as low as 0 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a car from our massive database to find cheap vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the 2021 Honda Odyssey. Then select Edmunds special offers, perks, deals, and incentives to contact the dealer of your choice and save up to $2,372 on a used or CPO 2021 Odyssey available from a dealership near you.

Can't find a new 2021 Honda Odysseys you want in your area? Consider a broader search.

Find a new Honda for sale - 7 great deals out of 9 listings starting at $18,900.

Why trust Edmunds?

Edmunds has deep data on over 6 million new, used, and certified pre-owned vehicles, including rich, trim-level features and specs information like: MSRP, average price paid, warranty information (basic, drivetrain, and maintenance), features (upholstery, bluetooth, navigation, heated seating, cooled seating, cruise control, parking assistance, keyless ignition, satellite radio, folding rears seats ,run flat tires, wheel type, tire size, wheel tire, sunroof, etc.), vehicle specifications (engine cylinder count, drivetrain, engine power, engine torque, engine displacement, transmission), fuel economy (city, highway, combined, fuel capacity, range), vehicle dimensions (length, width, seating capacity, cargo space), car safety, true cost to own. Edmunds also provides tools to allow shopper to compare vehicles to similar models of their choosing by warranty, interior features, exterior features, specifications, fuel economy, vehicle dimensions, consumer rating, edmunds rating, and color.

Should I lease or buy a 2021 Honda Odyssey?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

Check out Honda lease specials