Used 2016 Audi TTS

2016 Audi TTS
List price range
2016 Audi TTS

Pros

  • Impeccable cabin design bolstered by impressive level of technology
  • more power than you might think from the turbocharged, four-cylinder engine
  • precise handling that makes it easy to maneuver in any situation
  • standard all-wheel drive means it's sure-footed in any kind of weather.

Cons

  • Not many easily accessible storage places to stash a cell phone or wallet
  • limited cargo space so you need to pack light
  • rear seats are better for carrying your purse than they are for people.

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Edmunds' Expert Review

When it comes to performance coupes, it's not all about size and power. Consider the 2016 Audi TTS, a compact two-door with a four-cylinder engine that will astound you with its speed and maneuverability. Standard all-wheel drive, a high-tech interior design and a unique exterior are just a few more of the reasons why we think you'll find a lot to like in this German coupe. Ready to explore it a little further?

vehicle overview

The fully redesigned Audi TT is such an impressive car that its higher-performance sibling, the all-new 2016 Audi TTS, almost seems superfluous. After all, the last TT coupe we tested hit 60 mph in 5.5 seconds, pulled 0.99g on the skid pad and stopped from 60 mph in a sports-car short 103 feet. It's not like Audi skimps on creature comforts in the regular TT either; on the contrary, it's chock full of cool stuff, including an industry-first adaptive gauge cluster that seamlessly combines driver information with infotainment functions. With an entry-level model like that, who needs an upgrade?

The 2016 Audi TTS has been redesigned, but its new styling is still instantly familiar.

Well, a shopper who wants more power and better handling. That's who. Undeniably, the 2016 TTS makes significant progress on both fronts. Like the regular TT, it utilizes a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine, but the TTS's version makes 292 horsepower, a whopping 72-hp improvement. Then there's the TTS's trick suspension, which lowers the ride height by 10 millimeters for sharper responses. It also features adaptive magnetic dampers with four selectable ride settings. For good measure, Audi throws in the usual "S" styling touches, including silver mirror covers and quad exhaust tips, as well as standard sport seats with power-adjustable side bolsters.

Given the TTS's unique "mini-R8" looks and feature set, its most direct rival may in fact be the base TT. But there's a thriving community of high-performance vehicles in this price range, and each entrant has a sterling résumé. The Chevrolet Corvette delivers American attitude with unprecedented refinement, and its V8 engine makes every run through the gears an aural treat. The Porsche Cayman S is perhaps the closest thing to the TTS outside of Audi's stable, offering similar dimensions and styling plus textbook sports-car dynamics. The BMW M235i coupe may look a bit frumpy in this company, yet its velvety turbocharged inline-6 and athletic character prove it belongs. You're going to have a great time in any of these cars, but arguably none quite matches the 2016 Audi TTS's blend of technology, style and sophistication.

We Recommend

With its excellent outward visibility and maneuverability, you can forego the optional $3,250 Tech package with its parking sensors, rearview camera and blind spot monitor. That is, unless integrated navigation is a must-have.

Trim levels & features

The 2016 Audi TTS is sold solely as a 2+2 coupe. It's offered in a single trim level with a few available options.

Standard equipment includes Audi's familiar "S" exterior trim flourishes (sport front and rear fascias and side sills, silver mirror housings, quad exhaust tips), 19-inch wheels with summer performance tires, a lowered sport-tuned adaptive suspension with magnetorheological dampers, Audi Drive Select adjustable drive settings, automatic LED headlights, LED taillights, automatic wipers, an adaptive rear spoiler, rear parking sensors, heated mirrors and keyless entry and ignition.

Inside, the TTS provides the knob-based MMI infotainment system with touchpad capability, cruise control, automatic climate control, LED ambient lighting, a tilt-and-telescoping sport steering wheel with shift paddles, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, leather and synthetic-suede upholstery, heated 10-way power front seats (with four-way power lumbar and power side bolsters), folding rear seatbacks (coupe only), matte aluminum interior inlays, Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity, voice controls and a nine-speaker sound system with a CD/DVD player, an SD-card reader, satellite radio, two USB ports and an auxiliary audio jack.

The optional Technology package adds auto-dimming and power-folding side mirrors, blind-spot monitoring, front parking sensors, a rearview camera, a navigation system and "Audi connect" telematics with 4G WiFi hotspot capability and online services.

Additional options include 20-inch wheels, red-painted brake calipers, upgraded Napa leather and a 12-speaker Bang & Olufsen audio system that has more than four times the wattage of the standard setup.

The exclusive Launch Edition is limited to just 75 units and includes unique metallic black paint, special 19-inch wheels, red-painted brake calipers, a premium red Napa leather interior, piano black interior inlays, the Bang & Olufsen stereo and the Technology package.

2016 Highlights

The 2016 TTS coupe is fully redesigned.

Performance & mpg

Every 2016 Audi TTS packs a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine rated at 292 hp and 280 pound-feet of torque. The transmission is a six-speed automated manual with steering-wheel-mounted shift paddles. All-wheel drive is also standard.

Audi says the TTS coupe will sprint to 60 mph in a fleet 4.6 seconds, which would be 0.9 second quicker than the regular TT coupe's recorded time in Edmunds testing.

According to the EPA, the 2016 TTS should return 25 mpg in combined driving (23 city/27 highway). That's an oddly low highway figure for a four-cylinder engine these days, but the combined figure is still quite respectable given the high level of performance.

Safety

Standard safety features on the 2016 Audi TTS include traction and stability control, antilock disc brakes, front knee airbags, side curtain airbags and front side airbags that provide additional protection for occupants' heads and abdomens.

Rear parking sensors are standard on every TTS, while the optional Technology package brings front parking sensors, a rearview camera and a blind-spot monitor.

Driving

The 2016 TTS picks up where the base TT leaves off, cranking up the boost in a big way to threaten high-performance machines like the Cayman S and BMW M235i. It's not just about acceleration, though; with its exclusive lowered sport suspension and adaptive magnetic dampers, the TTS is also equipped to keep the pace in tight corners. Prodigious grip from the standard summer tires bolsters the TTS's impressive performance credentials. Nonetheless, the TTS promises to be one of the more civilized sporting cars in its price range, thanks to its ultra-refined engine, reasonably compliant ride and modest noise levels at cruising speeds.

Interior

The 2016 TTS's cabin is a triumph of contemporary style and technology, lacking only an obvious place to put your contemporary smartphone. As per Audi's norm, materials quality is exemplary, but that only begins to tell the story. The LED ambient lighting evokes a trendy cocktail lounge, while the optional Bang & Olufsen audio system (very much worth the extra cost) pumps vividly clear sound until your ears cry uncle. Delightful details are everywhere, such as the rotary bezel that controls each vent's airflow direction, rotating around the vent itself with what feels like machine-grade precision.

Note the lack of a center display screen for the 2016 Audi TTS. The configurable gauge cluster display takes its place.

On the electronics front, the standard 12.3-inch "virtual cockpit" digital gauge cluster doubles as the infotainment screen. This obviates the need for a separate central screen on the dashboard, though it also effectively takes the passenger out of the equation. When you're accessing infotainment functions, the middle area of the display dynamically expands, while the speedometer and tachometer shrink to the margins (though they never disappear). If you're worried about obsolescence down the road, don't be; the graphics are video-game crisp, and for that matter, the processing times and frame rates are video-game quick. There's a learning curve, to be sure, even though Audi still includes the familiar MMI control knob (and puts it on the center console this time, trumping the previous generation's annoying dash-mounted knob). But we got the hang of it before too long, and in case you suddenly need to bring the speedometer and tachometer back to full size, there's a handy "VIEW" button on the steering wheel that does just that. One downside, however, is that the driver is now responsible for everything regarding infotainment. If you have a passenger along with you, he or she can do little more than fiddle with the volume.

In terms of comfort, the TTS's cabin feels surprisingly airy and spacious, with plenty of room in all dimensions for taller folks. Well, in the front row, at least; the coupe's backseat is strictly for personal items, or perhaps very small children in a very tight pinch. If it were our TTS, we'd likely leave the rear seatbacks folded flat, which opens up significantly more cargo space than the standard 12.0 cubic feet.


Consumer reviews

Read what other owners think about the 2016 Audi TTS.

Overall Consumer Rating

Most helpful consumer reviews

Excellent for an enthusiast
Bailey Smith,11/10/2015
Disclaimer, I purchased a TTS but this information is still pertinent to a TT buyer (Dynamics) With the recent refresh, Audi brings the TT more inline with its yet to be released R8 big brother. The new IE8888 2.0 liter turbo four cylinder works beautifully with the S-tronic transmission (the only one available in the U.S.). There is just a bit of turbo lag below 2500 rpm, but once in the boost power is of no concern at all. The acceleration is more than enough for the average driver, and at freeway speeds even the base TT passes other cars with ease (but be sure to let the S-tronic downshift a couple gears first). With Audi's Quattro system, grip in poor conditions is not a problem if you're being reasonable (note: I live in a very snowy area of the U.S.) but I have gotten it to intentionally slide at low speeds. In dry conditions you'd have to be quite reckless to get this thing to lose grip, but it is manageable when the rear steps out of line. It handles well, but, (and this is a critique of all Audis I've experienced) the steering is pretty numb and doesn't provide much in the way of feedback on the road surface. The steering is, however, well weighted and is direct enough that I barely even need to think about where I want the car to go. The suspension is on the firmer side but it isn't harsh or jarring at all on decent road surfaces, body roll through corners is negligible and the chassis feels rock solid. Fuel economy is also better than advertised in my car, at freeway speeds I have achieved 29 mpg (US cycle) when I was told I should be getting 27.5 mpg or less (Technology) The Virtual Cockpit is undoubtedly the star of the Interior. It does take some time to get used to controlling almost everything through the steering wheel, but once acclimated it is quite intuitive and easy to use, even on the move. Safety isn't too much of a concern since the system is mounted very close to eye level (also of note I'm only 5'8" or 172 cm) but don't be too distracted by it. Also, the screen provides a good enough viewing angle to allow a passenger to use the entertainment system without struggle, but they can change the layout of the guages if they go into a submenu. The one critique that I have for the Virtual Cockpit is that the control buttons are somewhat small even with my diminutive hands and I could easily see somebody with larger or gloved hands struggle with the steering wheel mounted controls. This is remedied with a more conventional MMI control set up intended mostly for passengers, but it is somewhat disappointing given that it's a selling point of this car. I also have the technology package and B&O sound system, the first out of necessity and the later out of desire. The parking sensors and rearview camera are a must for this car as judging distances can be somewhat tough. The blind spot monitor is also a must have option because the C-pillar is simply massive and obtrusive in everyday driving. I could foresee an instance where a driver cannot see a motorcyclist behind them due to the size of the C-pillar, and backing out of parking spaced makes me nervous. My only real complaint about the technology is that active cruise control or front collision prevention isn't even offered. Of note, I believe this is offered in Europe but not North America for some reason. (Interior) Audi is known for their excellent interiors and this is no exception. I opted for the sports seats and the leather quality is superb, as is the comfort they provide. It is quite easy to make a long journey in this car without being fatigued or uncomfortable. The dashboard is made of a pretty high quality soft touch material that lends itself well to the aesthetic of the rest of the interior. The vent mounted HVAC controls are also pretty intuitive and in my opinion look stylish and futuristic. As for the rear seats, they really are an afterthought. They are basically reserved for children and the most petite of adults, although I have gotten people of 5'5" in the back for short periods, but they did complain about the space. In my experience they serve better as an extra storage space but they do have child seat mounts. One additional note, ingress and egress are difficult in this car not only by the long doors typical of coupes, but also by the wider side skirts and fairly wide door sill. Overall the interior is a great place to be as long as you do not plan on having more than one other passenger for long periods of time. (Storage) Despite its small size the TT actually impresses in the amount of storage it offers. There are numerous small cubbies in the main cabin and the trunk is surprisingly large, particularly when the seats are folded down. There is also a full size spare tire too (conclusion) This is a fun small high tech sports car that one can easily live with every day and enjoy. If you live in a colder climate and can justify having microscopic rear seats, this is a great all-weather sports coupe
Holy Cow is it fast!!!!!!
George,01/22/2016
be ready to pay close to sticker or sticker however every dime is worth an exhilarating drive and ride. Very fast and responsive in Sport mode!
The Lower Cost Cayman S
Andres,03/03/2017
This is Audi's version of a Porsche! Probably the Cayman S is the closest competitor in my view in terms of performance. The Audi brings a fantastic quattro AWD system and rear seats for people under 5' tall (and I do mean UNDER 5' tall). Audi has been making uber-reliable cars lately, and this one is no exception. In fact, the only problem I've had is with the dorky blind spot monitor sensors. I recommend sticking with the OEM 19" or after-market 18 or 19" wheels. The 20" look great, and are high quality wheels, but will give you a harsher ride. I love this car. A true sports car.
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Features & Specs

MPG
23 city / 27 hwy
Seats 4
6-speed automated manual
Gas
292 hp @ 5400 rpm
See all Used 2016 Audi TTS features & specs
More about the 2016 Audi TTS
Used 2016 Audi TTS Overview

The Used 2016 Audi TTS is offered in the following submodels: TTS Coupe. Available styles include quattro 2dr Coupe AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6AM).

What's a good price on a Used 2016 Audi TTS?

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Should I lease or buy a 2016 Audi TTS?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

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