Monthly Update for July 2017 - 2017 Honda Ridgeline Long-Term Road Test

2017 Honda Ridgeline Long-Term Road Test

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2017 Honda Ridgeline: Monthly Update for July 2017

by Travis Langness, Automotive Editor

Where Did We Drive It?
Seven months into testing our long-term 2017 Honda Ridgeline and it's still a sought-after vehicle for a variety of reasons. Sure, we've got a few complaints here and there, but it's mostly praise from the team. After last month's Death Valley escapades, the Ridgeline had one of its busiest months yet, adding more than 2,300 miles to the odometer and setting a new personal best for mpg. Many of the miles were in town, but we also took the truck tailgating and on a mini road trip to the mountains.

What Kind of Fuel Economy Did It Get?
This month, we averaged 21.4 miles per gallon over 2,362 miles. We filled the Ridgeline's tank eight times, with a best fill of 25.8 mpg. That's a new record for our Ridgeline and just over the highway EPA rating of 25 mpg. Our lifetime average currently 19.8 mpg, which is a bit shy of the 21 combined rating, but we've got a few road trips planned that should help things out.

Average lifetime mpg: 19.8
EPA mpg rating: 21 combined (18 city/25 highway)
Best fill mpg: 25.8
Best range: 406.6 miles
Current odometer: 12,093 miles

Maintenance and Upkeep
None.

Logbook Highlights
Performance
"For a hot minute, I looked for a Sport button in the Ridgeline, and I was disappointed I didn't find one. The throttle response was worse than I remembered, taking all kinds of pedal input to get it going. On the highway it felt sluggish and underwhelming. Then, I noticed the little green leaf that was lit up on the dashboard. Aha! The Econ mode was selected! The moment I turned it off, the truck felt better. The six-speed automatic felt like itself again. The 3.5-liter V6 was alive. This is the way to drive this truck: Econ mode, off." — Travis Langness, automotive editor

2017 Honda Ridgeline

Comfort
"Since Friday afternoon, I have marveled at how comfortable the Ridgeline is. It is great as a commuter vehicle and has excellent room for passengers all around. I know other editors have commented on this already, but seeing as I am unaccustomed to driving a truck this easygoing on the road, it was a real surprise. The harsh truck ride I expected is not present at all." — Rex Tokeshi-Torres, vehicle testing technician

"I continue to be impressed by how comfortable our Ridgeline is. I'll echo Rex's comments that this is the perfect commuter truck. There's plenty of people out there who just like driving a truck for how it looks and won't use much of its utility. This isn't the toughest-looking truck out there, but in this size class, you'd be hard-pressed to find a more composed and easy-to-drive vehicle." — Ron Montoya, senior consumer advice editor

2017 Honda Ridgeline

Interior
"The Ridgeline has two memory settings for the driver's seat. If you're driver No. 2, however, the vehicle won't remember that you drove it last. It will always default to driver No. 1. It's a problem quickly solved by the press of a button, but it's a bit annoying if you're in the second profile." — Ron Montoya

2017 Honda Ridgeline

Technology-Audio
"I'm a tech guy. I love technology — especially when it comes to making your life easier. Being able to integrate your personal tech (cellphone) into a variety of vehicles has been a dream come true. That being said, I have a couple of things to nitpick regarding technology features in the Ridgeline. 1) With an Android phone, the Ridgeline's Bluetooth audio (A2DP) loses connection intermittently. I have to disable Bluetooth on my phone and then re-enable it to play music again. Though this could potentially be attributed to the most recent update for Android OS. Stay tuned regarding this issue. 2) 'Leave me alone. I know what I'm doing' — While cruising down the street with my left hand grasping the top of the steering wheel, the wheel starts to shake slightly and I get a notification in the instrument panel that tells me that the road 'requires steering.' I'm on a road with a slight curve. I was going 35 mph, wasn't veering off in any direction (staying in my lane), and there was nothing around me. The notice went away when I put my hands at 2 and 10." — Rex Tokeshi-Torres

"I'm driving down Highway 18, at about 60 mph on cruise control. Twice now the forward collision warning has given me a false alarm. Both times the steering wheel vibrated and the big 'BRAKE' warning light flashed in front of my face. Thing is, nobody is ahead of me. It's a straight road. There are no obstructions. Sure, it's a two-lane road, but the lanes are wide. The few oncoming cars I'm encountering are staying centered in their lane, and so am I. Other times during the weekend it issued single warning chirps while driving straight for no good reason. Our Pilot did the same thing. I don't get it. Honda Sensing sounds like a good idea, but it sees ghosts and I don't trust it. Hello 'Off' button." — Dan Edmunds, director of vehicle testing

Miscellaneous
"This thing is a tailgating machine. The bucket in the bed of the truck functions excellently as a cooler and the in-bed speakers (drivers connected to the bed liner) are good enough for some parking-lot music. Stack all that on top of the fact that there are tons of underseat storage in the back seat for folding chairs, and you've got a truck that should be welcome at any baseball game." — Travis Langness

2017 Honda Ridgeline

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  • Comparison
  • Long-Term

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