2019 Dodge Challenger

What’s new

  • The SRT 392 and limited-edition SRT Demon leave the lineup
  • A new 797-hp SRT Hellcat Redeye model debuts
  • Other Hellcat models get a new dual snorkel hood and a 10-hp increase
  • The R/T Scat Pack Challenger is now available in Widebody form
  • New Brass Monkey and Stars and Stripes appearance packages
  • All-wheel drive is now available on the base SXT trim
  • Part of the third Challenger generation introduced for 2008

Pros & Cons

  • Boffo V8 engine choices
  • Roomy cabin can actually accommodate four adults
  • High degree of customization thanks to many trim levels and options
  • The ride is pretty comfortable compared to its muscle-car rivals
  • Large and heavy with cumbersome handling
  • Rear visibility is somewhat compromised
  • Unlike main rivals, a convertible is not available
MSRP Range
$27,845 - $69,995
MSRP Starting at
$27,845
Edmunds Suggested Price as low as
$28,262
Edmunds Suggests You Pay
$28,262 - $36,490

Save as much as $11,808
3 incentive offers available
Select your model:
Save as much as $11,808
3 incentive offers available
MSRP Range
$27,845 - $69,995
MSRP Starting at
$27,845
Edmunds Suggested Price as low as
$24,453
Edmunds Suggests You Pay
$24,453 - $36,490

Save as much as $11,808
Select your model:
Save as much as $11,808


Which Challenger does Edmunds recommend?

As far as we're concerned, the 2019 Dodge Challenger wouldn't be the same without a V8. That's why we recommend the R/T, which is the entry-level trim packing eight cylinders. Even better, you won't feel as if you're missing out on much since there's a long list of options. That means you can specify the R/T to meet your particular tastes and budget.

Edmunds' Expert Review

Overall rating

7.8 / 10

There aren't a lot of vehicles we consider to be muscle cars. The 2019 Dodge Challenger, with its outlandish horsepower and classic styling, certainly qualifies. Muscle cars are also known for their lack of practicality, but the Challenger bucks that trend by making fewer sacrifices in everyday usability thanks to its large trunk and relatively spacious rear seats. Compared to the Chevrolet Camaro and the Ford Mustang, the Challenger is downright sensible.

This year, Dodge has retired the range-topping 840-horsepower Demon. To compensate, there's the new 797-hp SRT Hellcat Redeye. It's basically the Demon but with a slightly detuned V8 and less drag-race-specific hardware. There are also some changes in the supporting trims. All-wheel drive is now available on the base SXT, the Widebody treatment is offered on the R/T Scat Pack, and a new dual-snorkel hood increases Hellcat output by 10 hp. Some trims also come with fewer standard features and corresponding price drops.

Even without these latest changes, the Challenger would have remained one of our favorite vehicles in any class. It doesn't have the corner-carving chops of the Camaro or the Mustang, and we're quite fine with that. Not many cars have this kind of sinister style or performance that won't break the bank or overtly compromise your daily drive.

2019 Dodge Challenger models

The 2019 Dodge Challenger is a five-seat, two-door coupe that is available in seven major trim levels, most of which are further divided into several subtrims. Major trim levels include the SXT, GT, R/T, R/T 392, SRT Hellcat and SRT Hellcat Redeye. The SXT and the GT Challenger trims are powered by a V6. The others are driven by increasingly more powerful V8s, culminating in the 797-hp Redeye.

Dodge Challenger SXT

First up is the SXT, powered by a 3.6-liter V6 engine (305 horsepower, 268 pound-feet of torque) matched to an eight-speed automatic transmission. Standard features include 18-inch wheels, keyless ignition and entry, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, dual-zone automatic climate control, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, a power-adjustable driver seat and 60/40-split folding rear seats. Tech features include Bluetooth, a 7-inch touchscreen, a rearview camera, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, two USB ports and a six-speaker sound system. The all-wheel-drive SXT upgrades to 19-inch wheels and upgraded brakes.

Dodge Challenger GT

The GT employs the same V6 and expands on the SXT's feature list with 20-inch wheels, the upgraded brakes, foglights, a hood scoop, rear parking sensors, remote ignition, a sport suspension, a performance steering system, more aggressively bolstered front seats, a sport steering wheel with shift buttons, and performance-related in-car apps. The all-wheel-drive GT reverts back to 19-inch wheels and loses the performance steering and sport suspension.

Dodge Challenger R/T

The R/T is the least expensive way into a V8 Challenger, offering a 5.7-liter engine paired to either a six-speed manual transmission (375 hp, 410 lb-ft) or the eight-speed auto (372 hp, 400 lb-ft). In addition to the GT features, you get different 20-inch wheels, a chrome fuel filler door, upgraded brakes, a limited-slip differential and an active sport exhaust.

Dodge Challenger R/T 392

The R/T 392 gets an even larger 6.4-liter V8 (485 hp, 475 lb-ft) along with launch control, a line lock for drag strip burnouts, Brembo performance brakes (four-piston front and rear), a higher-performance sport-tuned suspension, configurable driving modes, special styling elements, a black fuel door, a rear spoiler, heated cloth sport seats, a heated steering wheel, an 8.4-inch touchscreen with the newest version of Uconnect, a Wi-Fi hotspot, additional performance-related in-car apps, premium speakers, and HD and satellite radio.

There are also variants of the above, such as the Plus, R/T T/A, R/T Scat Pack and R/T Shaker that add a few extra features, special styling or performance enhancements. A new R/T Scat Pack 1320 has drag racers in mind, with numerous mechanical upgrades and weight reductions. The rear seats have been removed but can be added back for only $1.

Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat

The SRT Hellcat is all about raw speed, evidenced by its supercharged 6.2-liter V8 (717 hp, 650 lb-ft). It's also equipped with unique exterior styling, a dual-snorkel hood, a sportier adaptive suspension, six-piston Brembo brakes, quad exhaust tips and interior ambient lighting. The R/T 392 and the Hellcat are eligible for the Widebody package that has fender flares to accommodate wider tires that improve the car's handling and grip.

Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye

The new SRT Hellcat Redeye takes some inspiration from last year's Demon. The power output has been increased to ludicrous levels (797 hp, 707 lb-ft) and is only offered with an eight-speed automatic transmission.

Most of the features found on the upper trim levels can be added to the lower trims as options. Other add-ons include a sunroof, exterior stripes and graphics, xenon headlights, automatic high beams, automatic wipers, adaptive cruise control (automatic transmission only), forward collision warning, blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert, ventilated seats, leather and/or faux suede upholstery, removal of the rear seat, a power tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, a nine-speaker Alpine audio system, and an 18-speaker Harman Kardon premium surround-sound system.

A sunroof is optional on all Challenger trims, and new Hellcat buyers get a one-day course at an SRT Driving Experience school.

Trim tested

Each vehicle typically comes in multiple versions that are fundamentally similar. The ratings in this review are based on our full test of the Dodge Challenger Scat Pack Widebody (6.4L V8 | 6-speed manual | RWD).

Scorecard

Overall7.8 / 10
Driving7.5
Comfort7.5
Interior7.5
Utility8.0
Technology8.0

Driving

7.5
The Challenger may not be as fast or as responsive as the Mustang or Camaro, but it's always a hoot to drive. The Dodge's sheer size makes in-town maneuvering a bit tough (the widebody fenders don't help), but meaty tires and upgraded suspension help with handling and body roll.

Acceleration

7.5
With the 6.4-liter V8, power is readily available in any gear at almost any speed. Zero to 60 mph took just 4.9 seconds at the Edmunds test track, which is properly quick but slower than other modern muscle cars by a few tenths. If you want more speed, there's always the 707-hp Hellcat.

Braking

8.0
The brake pedal travel is a little long and a bit light at the top. But when you press into the stroke, the pedal feels confident and well-suited for everyday driving. During Edmunds testing, the Challenger came to a stop from 60 mph in 105 feet — a very short distance for such a big vehicle.

Steering

6.5
The Challenger's steering feels hefty and reassuring while driving straight down the road, but it's a bit heavy for maneuvering around town. The wide tires from the widebody configuration worsen its bulkiness. Turn-in response happens quickly at speed, though there isn't much feedback communicated from the tires or road surface.

Handling

7.5
Based on its sheer size (our Scat Pack widebody tester weighed in at 4,298 pounds), this is no sprightly sports car. But handling characteristics are surprisingly forgiving, and the grip limits are relatively high thanks to wide tires and the adaptive suspension that helps keep body roll in check.

Drivability

7.5
Power delivery from the hulking 485-hp V8 is very smooth. Predictable clutch engagement and an easy-effort pedal mean smooth starts and gear changes with the six-speed manual. Responsive steering helps with highway maneuverability. But in the city, there is no avoiding this car's immense proportions.

Comfort

7.5
Even when fitted with the Widebody package and stiffer adaptive suspension, the Challenger's highway ride quality is very good. Seat comfort is still near the top of the class. A relatively quiet cabin helps make it a nice place to be for extended periods.

Seat comfort

8.0
The seat cushions are relatively flat and firm but comfortable enough for long road trips or commutes. Bolstering keeps you in place well enough around corners. The door and center armrests are nicely padded. The rear seats are genuinely adult-size and relatively comfortable, which is rare for the class.

Ride comfort

7.5
The Challenger delivers a comfortable ride over small road imperfections but can feel pretty unsettled over larger cracks and potholes. The adaptive suspension helps increase handling limits but is still pretty stiff in its softest setting for everyday driving. The large 20-inch wheels and stiff tire sidewalls don't do it any favors either.

Noise & vibration

7.5
The Challenger is normally one of the quietest cars in the class. But with the optional 6.4-liter V8 and extra-wide tires, there's a bit more road noise. The rumble from under the hood is also always there, but it turns into a deep, pleasant growl under full acceleration. There were no squeaks or rattles evident in our test car.

Climate control

7.5
Dual-zone climate control is standard on the R/T and maintains the desired cabin temp well. Climate is controlled via the touchscreen or the knobs and buttons directly behind the shifter, making it somewhat hard to access. The seats heat well, but the ventilation could be more effective — and those controls are accessed exclusively in the touchscreen menus.

Interior

7.5
The Challenger is king when it comes to passenger and cargo space. It's a far more livable daily driver than its crosstown competition. Wrestling the large, heavy doors open to gain access can be a challenge, however, and visibility suffers a bit like the rest.

Ease of use

8.5
The controls consist of a combination of knobs and buttons that are large and easy to use. Some functions are tucked away in the touchscreen, but this interface is otherwise one of the easiest to use in the industry.

Getting in/getting out

7.0
The doors are large and open fully, allowing the potential for easy entry and exit. That said, the big doors are heavy and their size is a hindrance in tighter parking spaces. The handles are also a bit difficult to get a grip on. Rear-seat access is average for a muscle car.

Driving position

7.0
The Challenger is big everywhere, including the dashboard and seats. The driving position can be adjusted to fit most drivers, but it feels a bit cramped when you move your seat toward the dashboard for better forward visibility. The driver's seat has both power and manual adjustments, which is a bit cumbersome.

Roominess

8.0
This cabin is the roomiest in the segment with lots of legroom and shoulder room up front. Headroom is a bit tight for taller passengers, but that's common for the class. The rear seat doesn't quite fit passengers of all sizes, but it is far bigger than that of competitors and offers three seats versus two. A family car!

Visibility

6.5
Outward visibility is generally poor but typical for the segment. There are significant blind spots over both shoulders, and the windshield pillars obstruct forward sightlines more than your average vehicle. A large rearview camera display and a blind-spot monitor help considerably, but the rear camera resolution is very low.

Quality

7.0
There were no squeaks or rattles to speak of in our test car, which felt like a well-built car. The interior design is a bit dated, however. The materials quality is decent for the Challenger's lower trim levels but gets harder to accept as you look at the more expensive models such as the R/T Scat Pack and Hellcat.

Utility

8.0
While big American coupes aren't exactly perfect examples of utility, the Challenger easily leads the class throughout this category. You can legitimately fit children (or adults) in the back seat, and the trunk is massive compared to those of rivals.

Small-item storage

7.5
There's decent small-item storage throughout the cabin, but the cupholders are right behind the gearshift, which is somewhat problematic with a manual transmission. The door pockets are small, with small bottle holders up front. In coupes this size, space is at a premium, but the Challenger uses what it has relatively well.

Cargo space

9.0
The trunk opening is large, and its capacity blows the class away with a midsize sedan-like 16.2 cubic feet of cargo space. The Mustang's and Camaro's are a lot smaller. The rear seatbacks fold in a 60/40 split for extra utility.

Child safety seat accommodation

7.5
The rear seat has three sets of lower LATCH anchors, so with the right seats you can fit the kids three-wide in the back. The anchors are buried a bit, and of course this is a two-door coupe, but this back seat is still far more versatile than those of the Challenger's direct rivals.

Technology

8.0
With Apple CarPlay and Android Auto accompanying the Challenger's already easy-to-use Uconnect system, this plug-and-play system is one of the best out there. It's very easy to use with multiple solutions for the same commands. Compared to the class, however, the interface looks a bit dated.

Smartphone integration

8.0
Uconnect is one of the easiest systems on the market to use, and it has aged well. Quick smartphone connection, easy-to-understand controls and simple command structures make for easy, distraction-free driving. And if you don't like the Uconnect, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are standard.

Driver aids

7.5
A rearview camera and rear parking sensors are standard. The Driver Convenience package adds blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert. They worked well during our test without any false alerts.

Voice control

8.5
The voice controls use a simple, easy-to-learn structure and take basic commands for the audio, navigation and hands-free calling. Connecting your smartphone makes things even more familiar.

Consumer reviews

Read what other owners think about the 2019 Dodge Challenger.

5 star reviews: 85%
4 star reviews: 11%
3 star reviews: 0%
2 star reviews: 4%
1 star reviews: 0%
Average user rating: 4.8 stars based on 26 total reviews

Trending topics in reviews

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  • engine
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  • spaciousness
  • comfort
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Most helpful consumer reviews

5 out of 5 stars, Dodge Challenger is everything.
CrazyBilly,
R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe (6.4L 8cyl 6M)

Exceeds all expectations. Power to spare. Rides like a dream and accelerates like a champ!

5 out of 5 stars, In My Opinion Its The Best Bang For The Buck
Eric Kirshner,
R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe (6.4L 8cyl 6M)

I have owned a Mustang which was fun. I then followed the SUV/Crossover trend and owned SUVs for many years. I decided I wanted something fun and fast. I bought the Scat Pack Challenger. I had a few concerns like fuel mileage, insurance costs, and winter driving in the Chicago area. The gas mileage isn't spectacular but on the highway I can get high 20's. Insurance wasn't as bad as I thought. My age has something to do with that I'm sure. If you're in your teens or 20's this isnt a cheap car to insure. As far as winter driving I decided to get winter tires. I actually have more confidence driving my Scat Pack in snow and ice with winter tires than any of the 4wd SUVs I have owned that had all season tires. This car is fast. Its fast enough that I have no desire to own a Hellcat. There is only so much speed you can use on the streets. I dont take my car to the track. If i did then maybe a Hellcat would make sense. Horsepower does change everything. When a car has this much power it's hard not to enjoy driving. Even if you thought your previous cars had sufficient acceleration this might change your mind. I have always wanted a Lamborghini or Ferrari since I was a kid. This car is faster than the Countach and the Testarossa cars I dreamed of having. It's just a slight bit slower than the Huracan or Hellcat 0-60, and maybe 1.5 -2 seconds slower in the quarter mile. Not bad considering this is a $45,000 car well equipped with Alcantara seats.

4 out of 5 stars, Running in the SNOW it was better than my JEEP!
Beignet at the Beach,
GT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A)

I've driven several variants , and I really like the all wheel drive GT version with the 8 speed ZF automatic and the V6 pentastar engine. On the mountain twistys in VA & WVA it was outstanding . Quite a confidence builder for my long trip. A convertible version of this platform would be a MUST BUY for me. How about it FCA?

5 out of 5 stars, JAG
JAG,
R/T 2dr Coupe (5.7L 8cyl 6M)

Love this car !

Write a review

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2019 Dodge Challenger videos

Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 vs. Dodge Challenger Hellcat vs. Chevy Camaro ZL1 — Muscle-Car Comparison

Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 vs. Dodge Challenger Hellcat vs. Chevy Camaro ZL1 — Muscle-Car Comparison

CARLOS: In an Edmund's exclusive, here's the ultimate muscle car comparison. We've got the Chevy Camaro ZL1, Dodge Challenger Hellcat, and Ford Shelby GT500. These cars have never been as powerful or as capable. We have them outfitted in their highest performing configurations. The ZL1 one has the 1LE track package, the Hellcat is the Redeye wide body, in the GT500 has the carbon fiber track package. And they're all automatics, too. We've already done the drag race. Go watch that video if you haven't already. To do these cars justice in a proper comparison, we're going to find out which one's the fastest around a road course, which one's the most fun to drive, which one sounds the best, which one has the most useful interior, and which one does the baddest burn out. First, let's acknowledge our obvious biases. Kurt is a Ford owner. Elana lot as a dodge owner. And I'm a Chevy owner. ELANA: I also have a Plymouth and Pontiac. KURT: How are those brands doing? ELANA: Kurt, you are mean, but fair. The point is, it all cancels out. We're on an even playing field. CARLOS: So which one of these cars is the ultimate? Let's find out. All ELANA: Right we, have three extremely powerful cars behind us. And not only are they full of horses, they're also quite capable. Like, they can go around road horses, they're good on the street. But if we are going to call them muscle cars, there is one thing that they have to be able to do. KURT: Burnouts. CARLOS: Exactly. KURT: Yeah. CARLOS: So we're going to do this comparison up on the right foot by doing a burnout super test. Rules are simple, from a stop, start a burnout, and then go for distance. Longest burnout wins, but you can't use your brake pedal. This is a measurement of just pure, raw horsepower. If we see your brake lights, you're DQed, because science. ELANA: Yeah, I mean, burnout scientists say that. CARLOS: Yeah. KURT: Yeah. CARLOS: All right, stability control off, trac control off, manual mode engaged. I'm going to try to shift as manually through the gears, try to avoid red line. And we'll see how this goes. SPEAKER 4: Carlos in 3, 2, 1, go. CARLOS: That was weak. So the burnout won't carry through an up shift. You're basically limited to whatever first gear red lines at. Was just a practice run. SPEAKER 4: All right, Carlos. 3, 2, 1, go. That's a burnout. That's a burnout without brake use. Normally, you would use the brakes to of course, control the speed so you can do the longest burnout possible. But without brakes, that's a burnout. OK, I don't feel so embarrassed anymore. The trick, though, was to leave it in automatic and let the transmission shift itself. Because if I tried to shift manually, it would end the burnout. And the only thing that did-- well, it didn't do much of a burnout. The only thing it really did make me question my manliness. ELANA: Well, and also, like, whether or not you were truly an American. We were a little worried about you. CARLOS: I was worried myself. So we are still-- ELANA: I think you're still going a little. CARLOS: See some-- KURT: I'd say it ends we're right about here, because I don't really see anything past there. CARLOS: It's going to take a vote of two out of three. KURT: Yeah. ELANA: I mean, that's fine. Yeah, I can see it. CARLOS: 187 foot burnout. I'm OK with that. ELANA: I mean, it definitely gives us something to shoot for. KURT: All right, burnout time. I want everything turned off. And I'm going to get some wheel spin with the brakes, and then let it rip. I'm not going to shift it itself. I'm going to let it handle it. So wish me luck. SPEAKER 4: 3, 2, 1, go. KURT: Well, that was kind of spicy. Squirrelly. Not the best. ELANA: You know, Kurt, I was expecting more of a smoke show. I mean, it wasn't bad. CARLOS: Looks to me like it was worse than the Camaro. ELANA: Yeah, I have to say, the whole no brakes thing so that you can't really torque up on it and get them spinning, that's a hard rule. CARLOS: You know, but it's also-- that the only way to make it scientific, because you can probably drag the brakes, I'm thinking, and do a burn out for the entire duration of the straight. But it didn't look like that could do a standing burnout. KURT: I don't know what it is, but it just wouldn't really break the barriers loose, and I just kind of had to build up a little bit RPM and then just floor it. CARLOS: It seemed like you had to let the clutch engage. KURT: Kind of, sort of, yeah. CARLOS: And then you just rode out through first. But then you shifted into second, and it ended. KURT: As soon as it hit second, it hooked up, and the thing catapulted forward. CARLOS: Still seeing lines, though. ELANA: Yeah. KURT: Yeah, I mean, they're still there. CARLOS: They're just getting fainter. KURT: You know, the car does have a full tank of fuel. That's one weight. CARLOS: And we just ate lunch. KURT: I mean, that is burnout out science. CARLOS: Yeah. The funny thing is it looks like it resumes when you get it in a second. ELANA: Yeah. CARLOS: But it stopped here. ELANA: It counts. It brakes, it counts KURT: Yeah. CARLOS: Second gear burnouts are cool, but only if it continues. Longest continuous burnout. So we'll call it 124-- ELANA: 124, 125? CARLOS: Yeah. 124. KURT: I appreciate your generosity. ELANA: I'm excited and a little bit nervous. SRT mode. I'm going to use the same one I use for drag racing. And then let's get the traction control all the way Off SPEAKER 4: 3, 2, 1. CARLOS: Bravo. KURT: Yes. CARLOS: Bravo. KURT: Yes. ELANA: Does that count? KURT: Did that count? I like how polite you were led off after you trounced them. You were, I don't have to go any farther than this. CARLOS: You're a gracious winner. ELANA: I think it's my win. CARLOS: OK. You were a gracious winner. ELANA: I know but, it's just so fun. CARLOS: Yeah. What I like is it's not just the length. It's how dark the tire is relative to the Mustange and the Camaro. ELANA: You know why? Because that thing is heavy. And when it's sticking it down, it's sticking it down. CARLOS: I'm actually wondering if we have enough measuring tape. We may have to put down a marker somewhere and do some math afterwards. ELANA: I mean, at least there's no question about where it ends. You know, I was born here, but I feel like today is the day I truly became an American. CARLOS: Your birth certificate has just been laminated in the test. ELANA: They're going to put a picture of me in the White House. KURT: So we've gone way past where my mark. So 200 plus. Beyond 200. 200 plus. CARLOS: Should we call it? Give her 200 plus? ELANA: No, I want every single inch. CARLOS: You want every inch? ELANA: Yeah. CARLOS: That's going to take forever to reel that in, yeah. But-- KURT: I'm going to say-- and it almost keeps going. ELANA: No, it's like yours. It starts and it restarts. KURT: Right here. ELANA: Right here? CARLOS: We're pulling. KURT: So that's-- CARLOS: We'll call it 250. KURT: Yeah, let's just call it 250. CARLOS: Just because, what's the point of specificity at this point? KURT: Got down there. ELANA: Chuckle it up. Losers. KURT: That's going to be here forever. ELANA: I think they can see it from space. Before we go any further, guys, can we just-- can we just take a moment and process what's happening here? We have three cars, three American pony cars, with an average horsepower of-- CARLOS: 736. ELANA: You do that math in your head? CARLOS: I did it before. So smart. ELANA: He's super smart. But that's nuts. 736 is the average. You don't need a racing license. You don't need to have previously owned a lesser model from the same brand. Like, any one of us could just walk in-- if we had the money-- and then drive out in one of these. KURT: You're not old enough to buy a beer, but you're old enough to walk in and buy one of these cars. ELANA: That is very kind of you, Kurt, but I am actually over 21. CARLOS: Let's talk about what makes each one of these cars special, and let's start with the Dodge. ELANA: Sure, I mean, I did not expect to be standing here saying this but this 797 horsepower wide body Redeye Challenger is the least extreme car here. I mean, it doesn't have a giant carbon fiber wing. It doesn't have cool little arrow running all along the side. Even the hood, while functional, is kind of subtle compared to these two. And I think that's because both the Camaro and the Mustang are really focused on road course use. It's not that the Redeye isn't track-focused. It's just it's inspired by Dodge's barely legal drag racer. So the technology that's on it is more drag race focused, right? It's got like, a chiller and supercharger so that the air that goes in is really cool. So you can just keep running it-- at it all day long. Has great apps and infotainment systems so you can track all your quarter mile runs. Got a line lock. You can do great burnouts. It's got floor seats. You can put your whole family in it. It's got heated and vented seats, a heated steering wheel. Good radio. Like, you can just drive around and use it like a normal car. But it's not exactly the same usage plan as these two. CARLOS: Totally. The Camaro, I believe, is the underdog here. It's got the least power at 650. That's the bottom end of the spectrum in this comparison. It's the lightest. It has the least amount of interior space, has the least amount of visibility, too. Lowest price. And least treadwear. These tires have a treadwear rating of 100. ELANA: So that's just basically smooth, right? CARLOS: We're going to change them just after looking at them today. They're going to be done. But that speaks to the car's race track intentions, like you mentioned. It's got the 1LE track package, which gives it the wing, gives it the arrow on the front. And it gives it these really trick fixed dampers that are definitely for racetrack use, not for daily driveability comfort. This thing is firm. But it goes round racetracks really quickly. And it's still the least expensive car here. And in spite of that, it's got some really cool tech, like performance traction management, that really sophisticated stability control system that actually helps you drive faster. It's got an onboard video data logger it's got electronically control locking differential. You can get it with a manual-- ha, ha, ha. ELANA: OK, all right, yeah. CARLOS: And it's going to ask tested price that's 20 grand less than this Mustang. KURT: About the price-- we'll come back for the price. The Camaro is old and the Challenger is even older. So it is a brand new car, so you will pay a slight price premium. But it has the smallest engine, but it makes the second highest amount of horsepower. 760 horsepower from a 5.2 liter engine. This particular car is equipped with the carbon fiber track pack, which is why the price goes up over $94,000. But with that, you get these really tricked carbon fiber wheels. And to my memory, there are only two other cars in the world that use them right now. So-- CARLOS: And one of them is a Ferrari. KURT: Yes. ELANA: And is the other the Ford GT? CARLOS: Yep. KURT: Also part of the carbon fiber track pack is that cool rear wing and the lack of a rear seat. You can't be taken seriously if you have a rear seat. So this car is serious. It also has MagneRide shocks which are perfect. They handle the occasional track use or the constant track use. They handle highway driving. I think this car is the best all around performance car of the three. ELANA: All around performance car. Performance is great, don't get me wrong. But that's what track stuff, right? And how much time are you going to spend on the track versus on the street? CARLOS: The idea of a practicality test with these cars seems silly, but if you think about it, it makes sense, right? If you're going to take one of these cars, you're going to buy one of these cars, you're going to go to a track. You're going to go to a racetrack. And you're probably going to want a backup set of wheels and tires. Unless you have a trailer, those wheels and tires are going to need to go somewhere. ELANA: Like in the car. CARLOS: Yes. ELANA: Yeah. And I mean, I don't think it is silly to do a practicality test on these cars, because I really think that most of the people who buy them will have them on the street more than they'll have them on the track. For those folks, just pretend that these tires are groceries or babies. KURT: Those are big babies. CARLOS: We're going to try to fit as many wheels and tires into these cars as possible. Points for a number of wheels in tires that we can fit and the amount of time that we can get them all fit by. 3, 2, 1, go. ELANA: Oh yeah, we're going to be fine. KURT: Those are huge tires. CARLOS: They're big tires. ELANA: OK. I got this. I'll be fine. KURT: Yeah, let's help. CARLOS: Yeah. ELANA: Got that? KURT: I got it. ELANA: You think we can get two? KURT: No. CARLOS: Well, that doesn't matter, then. I think we get one in the back seat. You guys do the other backseat. KURT: OK. CARLOS: I'm glad we bagged these. ELANA: Let me get that for you. KURT: Thanks. Oh, you have a nice little power seat. Good. ELANA: Oh, do you not? KURT: Don't need it. Yet. ELANA: I mean, once I'm at the track-- CARLOS: And time. One minute, 21 seconds. ELANA: Beat that. There's no room for you guys in the car, so how am I going to get them out? CARLOS: All right, Kurt, 3, 2, 1. Go. ELANA: Whoa, that's a lot lighter. CARLOS: Don't help him. ELANA: But he helped me. CARLOS: Don't-- come on man. KURT: Fine. ELANA: Sorry, you're on your own, man. CARLOS: He gets the advantage of carbon fiber wheels. He has lots of interior space for a crushing weight. So the lack of a back seat is an advantage here. ELANA: Yeah. I think he's definitely going to be able to get two in the back and one in the front. CARLOS: Three wide. He might go three wide across the rear. I feel like a Sports Center caster. KURT: Can you guys shut up? CARLOS: Oh yeah, he's going to do three in the back. ELANA: No. CARLOS: This is a real Happy Gilmore moment right here. ELANA: This is wild. But what if it doesn't fit? CARLOS: He might actually-- that's a really-- ELANA: If it doesn't fit, he's-- CARLOS: If he's going to do all-- oh! Shut the door, shut the door, shut the door! Not only did you get all four in-- one minute, 16 seconds-- so you did it faster than we were able to do with the Challenger. ELANA: And you could bring a friend. CARLOS: But you passed so out of breath right now. KURT: Shut up. CARLOS: You are not running any races. KURT: Oh, no, I'm not. You're next. CARLOS: Oh boy. KURT: 3, 2 1. ELANA: Are we helping? CARLOS: This is going so badly. KURT: No. CARLOS: So badly. ELANA: It's actually half as big as it looks from the outside, and it looks small from the outside. CARLOS: Done. I think I've got this. KURT: He's at one already. CARLOS: We'll all go to the track together, right? KURT: Yeah. What are you doing? That's my seat. CARLOS: Done. Call it. KURT: One minute, 36 seconds. If you weren't last, we would probably disqualify you. ELANA: You didn't even shut the door. CARLOS: It's inside the vehicle. There was nothing in the rules about shutting things or being able to drive away. Camaro loses the practicality test. ELANA: Yeah, that's impractical. CARLOS: That's very impractical. KURT: It is one thing for these cars to look bad ass. But it's something else entirely they don't sound bad ass. CARLOS: We should measure this. KURT: Yeah. CARLOS: If only we had a sound expert. It's not revving above 3,000 RPM? It's in neutral. I've tried it in park. This wouldn't happen with a manual. ELANA: It'll only go to 4,000, and then it just stops you. I mean, how am I going to impress my neighbors with 4,000? KURT: Yeah, I don't have a limiter. It just let me rev all the way to 7,500 RPM. CARLOS: Mustang handily wins the sound competition. ELANA: It's almost like the Mustang engineers knew what people might want in a muscle car. CARLOS: Now we've got a winding track behind us. And we're not going to find out how fast they are-- we're not going to lap times just yet. But we're here to find out how these things drive as cars. Should you be afraid of them? ELANA: I mean, I think a lot of people are afraid of them because they are so powerful. But there's no reason to. I mean, they are surprisingly drivable. CARLOS: This is an important thing to find out, because even if you are going to race track, you still have to drive there and you have to drive home. So we're going to find out how they feel in that situation or on your favorite mountain road. ELANA: Is it a problem if my entire review of the Redeye is just me driving and giggling? This car is so fun. There is a lot of stuff that people can rightfully complain about. But that's not it. It's big. I mean, every time I go around a corner I'm slowing down, probably a lot more than Carlos and Kurt are going to have to in the Camaro and the Mustang, because I can feel all the weight of this car. But if you trust it, then sort of like a hippopotamus in ballet shoes-- it's capable of surprising grace. And also-- Oh my god. Whose idea was this? I'm sorry, I'm going to take this more seriously. These days, because there's no contemporary equivalent of say, the Chevelle, the pony cars have become muscle cars. And certainly, the Challenger meets all the definition of a muscle car which, is the company's biggest engine in its sort of sporty its midsize car. This is a midsize car and that is the biggest engine. 6.2 liters, a supercharger that is bigger than some engines, and of course, 797 horsepower. These seats are great. And they're huge. In fact, one of the things when you are on track is you kind of move around a little bit in them. They're not a tight fit. But when you're on the street, they're very, very comfortable and kind of plush. They're also heated and vented, which is an excellent luxury in a muscle car. As I go around this corner, visibility is not great. This is a big pillar. It is better than say, in the Camaro. And it's about equal to the Mustang. None of these cars are fantastic for seeing out of, because they're huge. They have these really long hoods. In the case of these performance versions, they have really high hoods, too. I mean, I'm sitting pretty high up just so that I can see over the bulges in the hood. If you're familiar with any of the Hellcats, there are three modes. There's sort of a street mode. They call it auto. A sport mode, which is really kind of more of a drag racing mode. Kind of gives you a lot more burnout in a straight line action. And then there's a track mode, which tightens everything up, makes the shift really hard. You can also make a custom mode, which is great, because if you like the sound and the shifts in track mode, but you like the steering better in straight mode, it's up to you, baby. You can do whatever you want. This car really does it best if you just let the speed automatic do all the work for you. Just don't try to second guess the machine. Let the robot win. Suspension-wise and like ride quality-wise, the Challenger absolutely destroys the other two. Or rather, the other two will destroy your kidneys and lower back, and the Challenger will be like sitting on the couch. So yes, this thing is huge. Compared to the other two cars, it's kind of a monster. But there's a benefit to that. And that benefit is a more comfortable ride and obviously, more space. I mean, the Mustang doesn't even have a backseat. And the Challenger-- heck, road trip it. I think if you put all three cars together and said which one most meets the definition of a muscle car, the Challenger would win, hands down. The other two at this point are almost sports cars. And then of course, sports cars have become super cars. Where will it end? Don't ever let it end. CARLOS: The Camaro ZL1 one on a winding track. We're going to treat this like a country road and talk about the things that make the Camaro ZL1 1LE fun to drive. There's a lot to talk about in that respect. Yes, this car lost the sound coolness tests and you know, barely squeaked by the usability test. But the way this thing drives remains its primary attribute. And I've got to admit, with the exhaust and track mode, when you're not trying to rev it while idle, it does sound very good in here. It's a deep baritone roar. It's not a lot of nuance to the sound. It's just sort of loud, and in your face, and brutish, and broad. But you got to admit, that sounds good. And we have a 10 speed automatic that can make shifts that quick. It's a weird situation because this supercharged V8 has such a broad torque delivery. And yet when you're really on it, the transmission is shifting, and RPMs are dropping in such small increments, that it's a weird experience. You never expect a car with this kind of power and this broad of a torque curve to be able to shift so quickly and only had the RPMs drop so much. I mean, this engine could be peakier and use that kind of a different characteristic of power. But I got to say, I enjoy this as is. Though I might enjoy it more if I had a manual. Hmm. So the 1LE track package imbues this car with a lot of really nice handling attributes. And they all relate back into the driving experience when on a mountain road. Of course, the tires need to be at temperature. That's a major issue with these cars, because these are race track-oriented tires. When these tires are cold, they are uncommunicative and they are slippery. This morning, it was in the mid 30s as we were driving into the track, and boy, did the tires have some trouble with merging on freeway and whatnot. But that's what you're getting into when you get a 1LE track package. You are buying the track package. You are opting in to that experience. That's OK. But when the tires are on, they start working really nicely with these shocks. These fixed spool valve damper shocks. The way the rest of the suspension is set up, it is highly adjustable for the weekend track we're at. But in the setting it's in now, it's also fine, too. Not compliant on the road. It's pretty firm, especially over bumps. It doesn't have nice adaptive dampers to soak up and adjust for comfort. This thing is all hardcore track use. But it ties all this car together. And you end up with a lot of confidence in this car, especially in the front end. That's important, because you have so much power. You need to be able to trust this thing to put the power down and let you get escape from corner to corner. It's a big deal. You get really nicely weighted confident steering. When the tires are working-- again, that's a caveat we keep referencing-- but when they're working, it feels really good. The Camaro shows its downsides in normal driving. You got a peek of that at the interior usability test or functionality tests, where we loaded these cars up with wheels and tires. There was no space left over at all. And that's a problem with the Camaro. The trunk aperture is tiny. This interior space feels tiny as well. The visibility outward is extremely poor. It's shocking how tight the view can be outside of this car. Also, when it comes to daily driving, I gotta say, the 10 speed automatic does come into its own. This transmission works great when you're pushing it really hard and when you're just tooling around town. It's when you're kind of doing the half way driving that it's not as responsive as the Mustang's dual clutch, which is very snappy and very crisp all the time. This is still a tremendous machine for road course use. And one that, ride comfort aside, is still civil enough for daily use. We still have heated and ventilated seats. I think this has heated steering wheel as well. You've still got good integration through your infotainment with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto. Although the screen does kind of look like it's tilted back in. That's always been an annoyance with Camaros. Still, ZL1 1LE is the best Camaro ever at its specific job, that race track use. And to say it's not as punishing as it could be on the road is quite a testament to its many skills and attributes. But just know what you're getting in for. There's a lot going on here. And for the money, I think this is an incredible value. KURT: The new Shelby GT500. So it's one thing to rip around in a car like this and drive it like a hooligan. But most of the time people drive these cars, they're not really going to be in track mode like I am right now. They're going to be in maybe sports, so let's drop that into sport, pop it out of manual mode, and just cruise around, and tell you what it's like to drive it. Obviously, it makes a lot of power. That 5.2 liter engine has a giant supercharger on it. Cranks out 760 horsepower. And yeah, it goes fast. There's no two ways about it. But what's really impressive about this engine is just how tractable it is. I mean, I'm kind of cruising around now and it's still friendly. It's quick to respond. And I've driven this car in traffic, and it could care less that you're in traffic. It's happy to burble along. And for an engine with this kind of power-- I continue to be impressed with modern engines. This engine should not be this easy to drive, and it is. Putting all this power to the ground is smooth because of a seven speed dual clutch automatic transmission. The other to use a more traditional automatic setup. But this is quick shifts, crisp, and not abrupt or jarring. It's still really responsive. Wow, listen to that. I mean, I want this in my everyday car. I'm going to put this into Normal mode now and just cruise around like a normal person. Now these are pretty good tires these are Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires. And that's compared to the ones on the Camaro, they're fairly run of the mill high performance tires. I mean, you can find these on any old Porsche 911. But these tires talk to you. And they have good grip when they're cold, they have good grip when they're warm. Every aspect of this car makes it a friendly car. And you can't say enough about it. In case you hadn't noticed from all the other pictures of this car, it has ginormous brakes on the front. It has the 16.5 inch brake rotors. And the calipers-- yeah, they're six-piston calipers, but they're gigantic six-piston calipers. A car like this shouldn't be this easy to drive at high speed. It shouldn't be this easy to drive at low speed. I think Ford's really found the GT500 sweet spot. I'd argue this is the most well rounded performing car of the group. You've got comfort when you want it, you've got speed when you want it. You got sound, you got quiet, you got everything. And if you've got the money, You should probably buy one of these. So we've had some fun. And ride over there is a road course. It's short, but it's fast. It should be fun. And I think we should do some time laps. ELANA: Well, if we do time laps, then we really need those to be consistent, so probably the same person should drive all three. CARLOS: Oh, dibs. Can't fight dibs! KURT: Come on, dude. ELANA: He's right, though. You can't fight dibs. KURT: I hate him. ELANA: Carlos, you ready? 3, 2, 1. Punch it, baby. KURT: I'm surprised that car turned. ELANA: They made an effort with it. And it also has steam rollers of rubber underneath it. KURT: Does it? Can I say across the line? ELANA: Yeah, do it. KURT: Is that trademarked? I have no idea if that's fast or not. ELANA: 38:37, Carlos. 3, 2, 1. go. KURT: He tried to get clever with launch control. ELANA: Do you feel like that worked for him? KURT: No. ELANA: I mean, I know he's tried to warm up these tires, because they are a lot fussier. KURT: This looks a bit faster. ELANA: It does look fast. 36:11. KURT: 2.2 something seconds faster. CARLOS: That launch control sucks. What happened? ELANA: That wasn't so hot. CARLOS: It was great, then it was bleh! It was like, what? What's going on? ELANA: Do you feel like you need to try it again? CARLOS: No, it's Chevy's problem. ELANA: Well, it was still faster than the Hellcat. CARLOS: Good. As physics would dictate. KURT: And it sounds decidedly less bad ass and the Hellcat does. CARLOS: I'll tell you what, though. best tires here. KURT: Yeah. ELANA: Pony Boy, you ready? 3, 2, 1. Go! CARLOS: Love that seven speed in the car. ELANA: I like how there's just a hint of supercharge. CARLOS: Yeah. KURT: Woo. Don't let him know. He'll just get a big hit on the. Camaro CARLOS: How did I do? ELANA: I believe your car won because that was a 36:27. KURT: Do I leave the Camaro now? CARLOS: Even with a bad launch? KURT: Yeah. Those tires, man. Those tires. CARLOS: OK, let's recap. Winner of the test numbers, Ford. Winner of the burnout. ELANA: I vaguely remember the Challenger doing pretty well there. CARLOS: Utility, board. KURT: Sound board. Fun on the mountain road? Three way tie? ELANA: Yeah. I mean, I think we all had fun. CARLOS: Three way tie. Time to hot laps? KURT: Oh, Camaro. That's its job. ELANA: Yeah, I don't think you need to be super good at math to figure out that the Mustang handily takes us. And I would be mad-- I mean, I wanted the Challenger to win, It's so fun. It should be celebrated for that. But it's had its time at the. Top and if it inspired something as good as the Mustang, I mean, I feel kind of proud about that. I don't think it takes anything away from the Camaro or the challenger to recognize how good the Mustang is. CARLOS: Yeah, all three of these cars are really good at their specific jobs, right? The Challenger is a factory. The Camaro takes road racing very seriously. People who are really into going around racetracks fast and don't want to spend a lot of money, the Camaro 1LE ZL1 is an incredible value. But still, you gotta acknowledge what that GT-500 delivers. KURT: I'm shocked at just how well-rounded it is. I mean, previous iterations of the GT500 have been really fast and they've been really loud, but they just haven't had the breadth, the practicality, and handling ability that this new one has. And it is brand new. Both of those other cars have been around for a while. So Ford has had a chance to look at them and learn from them. But it's just-- it's such an impressive car. CARLOS: And not only is it the ultimate muscle car, it makes you re-evaluate what your expectations are for a muscle car. And that's why it easily wins this comparison. ELANA: Yeah, no question. KURT: Yeah, I agree. CARLOS: So thanks for watching. Please be sure to subscribe, like, and visit Edmunds for all your car shopping needs, helping you pick the right car at the right price. You guys remember the M4? ELANA: Vaguely. KURT: Oh yeah ELANA: Like, Supra wasn't that a car. CARLOS: It wasn't even that long ago. KURT: No. CARLOS: AMX. I think they make those anymore. ELANA: Pontiac Firebird? KURT: Cuda.

What do you get when you have a Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 1LE, a Dodge Challenger Hellcat Redeye Widebody and a Ford Mustang Shelby GT500? The ultimate muscle-car comparison. The Camaro ZL1 and the Challenger Hellcat are established players in this space, but the arrival of the GT500 resets expectations from modern muscle cars. The ZL1 1LE is a hardcore racetrack-oriented beast, while the Hellcat Redeye has the bragging rights of 800 hp and comfort for the daily commute. What does the GT500 add to this trio? Watch and find out.

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Features & Specs

SXT 2dr Coupe features & specs
SXT 2dr Coupe
3.6L 6cyl 8A
MSRP$27,845
MPG 19 city / 30 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission8-speed shiftable automatic
Horsepower305 hp @ 6350 rpm
See all for sale
R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe features & specs
R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe
6.4L 8cyl 6M
MSRP$38,995
MPG 14 city / 23 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission6-speed manual
Horsepower485 hp @ 6100 rpm
See all for sale
R/T 2dr Coupe features & specs
R/T 2dr Coupe
5.7L 8cyl 6M
MSRP$34,295
MPG 15 city / 23 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission6-speed manual
Horsepower375 hp @ 5150 rpm
See all for sale
GT 2dr Coupe features & specs
GT 2dr Coupe
3.6L 6cyl 8A
MSRP$30,395
MPG 18 city / 27 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
Transmission8-speed shiftable automatic
Horsepower305 hp @ 6350 rpm
See all for sale
See all 2019 Dodge Challenger features & specs

Safety

Our experts’ favorite Challenger safety features:

Blind-Spot Monitoring
Illuminates a light on either of the Challenger's side mirrors when a vehicle enters its blind spot.
Forward Collision Warning
Helps prevent collisions by sounding an alert when the Challenger detects an imminent collision.
Rear Cross-Traffic Alert
Sounds a warning if a vehicle is approaching the Challenger from the side while it is backing into traffic.
NHTSA Overall Rating 5 out of 5 stars

The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration offers independent analysis.

Frontal Barrier Crash RatingRating
Overall4 / 5
Driver4 / 5
Passenger5 / 5
Side Crash RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Side Barrier RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Driver5 / 5
Passenger5 / 5
Combined Side Barrier & Pole RatingsRating
Front Seat5 / 5
Back Seat5 / 5
RolloverRating
Rollover4 / 5
Dynamic Test ResultNo Tip
Risk Of Rollover11.1%

IIHS Rating

The Insurance Institute of Highway Safety uses extensive crash tests to determine car safety.

Side Impact Test
Good
Roof Strength Test
Acceptable
Rear Crash Protection / Head Restraint
Acceptable
IIHS Small Overlap Front TestNot Tested
Moderate Overlap Front Test
Good

Dodge Challenger vs. the competition

Dodge Challenger vs. Ford Mustang

The Challenger has always been an outlier among muscle cars due to its larger footprint. That’s true today and is evident when pitted against the Ford Mustang. The Mustang looks and feels like the smaller car that it is, but whatever it gains in terms of nimble handling, it gives back when it comes to practicality. The Challenger can hold four adults and a lot of cargo, while the Mustang is only comfortable for two.

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Dodge Challenger vs. Chevrolet Camaro

The Ford Mustang may lack some practicality, but the Camaro makes it seem sensible by comparison. In practicality, the Challenger retains the lead, far and away. The Camaro's trunk is tiny, and the small opening on top further hampers usability. Then there's the issue of visibility out of the Camaro. Its small windows and large roof pillars keep you guessing in turns, but the Camaro performs far better than the Challenger on the road when the pavement twists.

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Dodge Challenger vs. Dodge Charger

Think of the Charger as the Challenger's non-identical twin. Underneath both of them is a Mercedes-based chassis from the 1990s paired with many of the same engine choices and features. The Challenger retains a lot of the retro style from its past, while the Charger has more contemporary roots. They both drive similarly, so the real decision is whether you want four or two doors.

Compare Dodge Challenger & Dodge Charger features
FAQ
Is the Dodge Challenger a good car?
The Edmunds experts tested the 2019 Challenger both on the road and at the track, giving it a 7.8 out of 10. Edmunds’ consumer reviews show that the 2019 Challenger gets an average rating of 5 stars out of 5 (based on 26 reviews) You probably care about Dodge Challenger fuel economy, so it's important to know that the Challenger gets an EPA-estimated 16 mpg to 23 mpg, depending on the configuration. What about cargo capacity? When you're thinking about carrying stuff in your new car, keep in mind that the Challenger has 16.2 cubic feet of trunk space. And then there's safety and reliability. Edmunds has all the latest NHTSA and IIHS crash-test scores, plus industry-leading expert and consumer reviews to help you understand what it's like to own and maintain a Dodge Challenger. Learn more
What's new in the 2019 Dodge Challenger?

According to Edmunds’ car experts, here’s what’s new for the 2019 Dodge Challenger:

  • The SRT 392 and limited-edition SRT Demon leave the lineup
  • A new 797-hp SRT Hellcat Redeye model debuts
  • Other Hellcat models get a new dual snorkel hood and a 10-hp increase
  • The R/T Scat Pack Challenger is now available in Widebody form
  • New Brass Monkey and Stars and Stripes appearance packages
  • All-wheel drive is now available on the base SXT trim
  • Part of the third Challenger generation introduced for 2008
Learn more
Is the Dodge Challenger reliable?
To determine whether the Dodge Challenger is reliable, read Edmunds' authentic consumer reviews, which come from real owners and reveal what it's like to live with the Challenger. Look for specific complaints that keep popping up in the reviews, and be sure to compare the Challenger's 5-star average consumer rating to that of competing vehicles. Learn more
Is the 2019 Dodge Challenger a good car?
There's a lot to consider if you're wondering whether the 2019 Dodge Challenger is a good car. Edmunds' expert testing team reviewed the 2019 Challenger and gave it a 7.8 out of 10. Our consumer reviews show that the 2019 Challenger gets an average rating of 5 stars out of 5 (based on 26 reviews). Safety scores, fuel economy, cargo capacity and feature availability should all be factors in determining whether the 2019 Challenger is a good car for you. Learn more
How much should I pay for a 2019 Dodge Challenger?

The least-expensive 2019 Dodge Challenger is the 2019 Dodge Challenger SXT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A). Including destination charge, it arrives with a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of about $27,845.

Other versions include:

  • SXT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A) which starts at $27,845
  • R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe (6.4L 8cyl 6M) which starts at $38,995
  • R/T 2dr Coupe (5.7L 8cyl 6M) which starts at $34,295
  • GT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A) which starts at $30,395
  • SRT Hellcat Redeye 2dr Coupe (6.2L 8cyl S/C 8A) which starts at $69,995
  • GT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A) which starts at $33,445
  • SXT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A) which starts at $30,895
  • SRT Hellcat 2dr Coupe (6.2L 8cyl S/C 6M) which starts at $58,995
Learn more
What are the different models of Dodge Challenger?
If you're interested in the Dodge Challenger, the next question is, which Challenger model is right for you? Challenger variants include SXT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A), R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe (6.4L 8cyl 6M), R/T 2dr Coupe (5.7L 8cyl 6M), and GT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A). For a full list of Challenger models, check out Edmunds’ Features & Specs page. Learn more

More about the 2019 Dodge Challenger

The 2019 Dodge Challenger satisfies a certain type of driver who craves the power and style that muscle cars have been delivering for more than 40 years. Unlike its Ford Mustang and Chevrolet Camaro rivals, the Challenger scores points for convenience thanks to its spacious rear seats and large trunk. Prices are comparable among all three competitors from the base models up to the well-equipped V8 trims, but the Challenger pulls way ahead at the top end with the all-new SRT Hellcat Redeye.

Standard feature highlights for the SXT include a 305-horsepower 3.6-liter V6 engine matched to an eight-speed automatic transmission. Standard features include 18-inch wheels, automatic headlights, heated mirrors, keyless ignition and entry, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, dual-zone automatic climate control, cloth upholstery, a 7-inch touchscreen, a rearview camera, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, two USB ports and a six-speaker sound system. The all-wheel-drive SXT upgrades to 19-inch wheels and upgraded brakes.

The GT adds 20-inch wheels, foglights, a hood scoop, rear parking sensors, remote ignition, a sport suspension, a performance steering system, a sport steering wheel with shift buttons, and performance-related in-car apps. The all-wheel-drive GT reverts back to 19-inch wheels.

The R/T is the entry-level V8 Challenger, with a 375-hp 5.7-liter engine paired to either a six-speed manual transmission or the eight-speed auto that reduces output to 372 hp. In addition to the GT features, you get 20-inch wheels, a chrome fuel filler door, upgraded brakes, a limited-slip differential and an active sport exhaust.

The R/T 392 gets a larger 485-hp 6.4-liter V8 along with launch control, a line lock for drag strip burnouts, Brembo performance brakes, a sport-tuned suspension, configurable driving modes, a black fuel door, a rear spoiler, heated sport seats, a heated steering wheel, an 8.4-inch touchscreen with the newest version of Uconnect, a Wi-Fi hotspot, additional performance-related in-car apps, premium speakers, and HD and satellite radio.

There are also variants of the above, such as the Plus, R/T T/A, R/T Scat Pack and R/T Shaker that add a few extra features, special styling or performance enhancements.

The SRT Hellcat is powered by a 717-hp a supercharged 6.2-liter V8. It's also equipped with unique exterior styling, a dual-snorkel hood, a sportier adaptive suspension, six-piston Brembo brakes, quad exhaust tips and interior ambient lighting. The R/T 392 and the Hellcat are eligible for the Widebody package that improves the car's handling and grip. The new 797-hp SRT Hellcat Redeye takes some inspiration from last year's Demon and is only offered with an eight-speed automatic transmission.

Most features found on the upper trim levels can be added to the lower trims as options. Other add-ons include a sunroof, exterior stripes and graphics, xenon headlights, automatic high beams, automatic wipers, adaptive cruise control, forward collision warning, blind-spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert, ventilated seats, leather and/or faux suede upholstery, removal of the rear seat, a power tilt and telescoping steering wheel, a nine-speaker Alpine audio system, and an 18-speaker Harman Kardon premium surround-sound system.

There are obviously a lot of 2019 Dodge Challenger models to choose from. Use all of Edmunds' available tools to pick out the right model for your tastes and budget.

2019 Dodge Challenger Overview

The 2019 Dodge Challenger is offered in the following submodels: Challenger Coupe, Challenger SRT Hellcat, Challenger R/T Scat Pack, Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye. Available styles include SXT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A), R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe (6.4L 8cyl 6M), R/T 2dr Coupe (5.7L 8cyl 6M), GT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A), SRT Hellcat Redeye 2dr Coupe (6.2L 8cyl S/C 8A), GT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A), SXT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A), and SRT Hellcat 2dr Coupe (6.2L 8cyl S/C 6M).

What do people think of the 2019 Dodge Challenger?

Consumer ratings and reviews are also available for the 2019 Dodge Challenger and all its trim types. Overall, Edmunds users rate the 2019 Challenger 4.8 on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. Edmunds consumer reviews allow users to sift through aggregated consumer reviews to understand what other drivers are saying about any vehicle in our database. Detailed rating breakdowns (including performance, comfort, value, interior, exterior design, build quality, and reliability) are available as well to provide shoppers with a comprehensive understanding of why customers like the 2019 Challenger.

Edmunds Expert Reviews

Edmunds experts have compiled a robust series of ratings and reviews for the 2019 Dodge Challenger and all model years in our database. Our rich content includes expert reviews and recommendations for the 2019 Challenger featuring deep dives into trim levels and features, performance, mpg, safety, interior, and driving. Edmunds also offers expert ratings, road test and performance data, long-term road tests, first-drive reviews, video reviews and more.

Our Review Process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.

What's a good price for a New 2019 Dodge Challenger?
2019 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe (6.4L 8cyl 6M)

The 2019 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe (6.4L 8cyl 6M) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $41,585. The average price paid for a new 2019 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe (6.4L 8cyl 6M) is trending $8,124 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $8,124 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $33,461.

The average savings for the 2019 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe (6.4L 8cyl 6M) is 19.5% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 3 2019 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack 2dr Coupe (6.4L 8cyl 6M) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2019 Dodge Challenger GT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A)

The 2019 Dodge Challenger GT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $35,630. The average price paid for a new 2019 Dodge Challenger GT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A) is trending $7,252 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $7,252 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $28,378.

The average savings for the 2019 Dodge Challenger GT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A) is 20.4% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 10 2019 Dodge Challenger GT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2019 Dodge Challenger SXT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A)

The 2019 Dodge Challenger SXT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $33,080. The average price paid for a new 2019 Dodge Challenger SXT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A) is trending $6,394 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $6,394 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $26,686.

The average savings for the 2019 Dodge Challenger SXT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A) is 19.3% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 6 2019 Dodge Challenger SXT 2dr Coupe AWD (3.6L 6cyl 8A) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2019 Dodge Challenger SXT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A)

The 2019 Dodge Challenger SXT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $31,125. The average price paid for a new 2019 Dodge Challenger SXT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A) is trending $6,758 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $6,758 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $24,367.

The average savings for the 2019 Dodge Challenger SXT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A) is 21.7% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 5 2019 Dodge Challenger SXT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2019 Dodge Challenger R/T 2dr Coupe (5.7L 8cyl 6M)

The 2019 Dodge Challenger R/T 2dr Coupe (5.7L 8cyl 6M) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $36,480. The average price paid for a new 2019 Dodge Challenger R/T 2dr Coupe (5.7L 8cyl 6M) is trending $3,440 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,440 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $33,040.

The average savings for the 2019 Dodge Challenger R/T 2dr Coupe (5.7L 8cyl 6M) is 9.4% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 3 2019 Dodge Challenger R/T 2dr Coupe (5.7L 8cyl 6M) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat 2dr Coupe (6.2L 8cyl S/C 8A)

The 2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat 2dr Coupe (6.2L 8cyl S/C 8A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $74,540. The average price paid for a new 2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat 2dr Coupe (6.2L 8cyl S/C 8A) is trending $11,808 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $11,808 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $62,732.

The average savings for the 2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat 2dr Coupe (6.2L 8cyl S/C 8A) is 15.8% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 1 2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat 2dr Coupe (6.2L 8cyl S/C 8A) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2019 Dodge Challenger GT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A)

The 2019 Dodge Challenger GT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $36,570. The average price paid for a new 2019 Dodge Challenger GT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A) is trending $7,146 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $7,146 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $29,424.

The average savings for the 2019 Dodge Challenger GT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A) is 19.5% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 1 2019 Dodge Challenger GT 2dr Coupe (3.6L 6cyl 8A) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

Which 2019 Dodge Challengers are available in my area?

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2019 Dodge Challenger for sale near. There are currently 159 new 2019 Challengers listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $30,260 and mileage as low as 0 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a car from our massive database to find cheap vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the 2019 Dodge Challenger. Then select Edmunds special offers, perks, deals, and incentives to contact the dealer of your choice and save up to $13,320 on a used or CPO 2019 Challenger available from a dealership near you.

Can't find a new 2019 Dodge Challengers you want in your area? Consider a broader search.

Find a new Dodge Challenger for sale - 2 great deals out of 19 listings starting at $14,622.

Find a new Dodge for sale - 10 great deals out of 19 listings starting at $22,577.

Why trust Edmunds?

Edmunds has deep data on over 6 million new, used, and certified pre-owned vehicles, including rich, trim-level features and specs information like: MSRP, average price paid, warranty information (basic, drivetrain, and maintenance), features (upholstery, bluetooth, navigation, heated seating, cooled seating, cruise control, parking assistance, keyless ignition, satellite radio, folding rears seats ,run flat tires, wheel type, tire size, wheel tire, sunroof, etc.), vehicle specifications (engine cylinder count, drivetrain, engine power, engine torque, engine displacement, transmission), fuel economy (city, highway, combined, fuel capacity, range), vehicle dimensions (length, width, seating capacity, cargo space), car safety, true cost to own. Edmunds also provides tools to allow shopper to compare vehicles to similar models of their choosing by warranty, interior features, exterior features, specifications, fuel economy, vehicle dimensions, consumer rating, edmunds rating, and color.

Should I lease or buy a 2019 Dodge Challenger?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

Check out Dodge lease specials