2020 Toyota C-HR

What’s new

  • Revised front-end design
  • Android Auto now available
  • LED headlights and satellite radio now standard on all trims
  • Part of the first C-HR generation introduced for 2018

Pros & Cons

  • Sporty handling makes it fun to zip around turns
  • Comes standard with plenty of features, including safety tech
  • Swoopy styling helps it stand out
  • Unlike on most rivals, all-wheel drive isn't available
  • Even in this slow class, acceleration is lethargic
  • Pervasive road and engine noise in the cabin
  • Minimal cargo space, even for its small segment
Other years
Toyota C-HR for Sale
MSRP Starting at
$21,295

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2020 Toyota C-HR Review

In many ways, the 2020 Toyota C-HR can be a case study in untapped potential. When it debuted in the fledgling subcompact-crossover class, it benefitted from sporty handling, plenty of standard features and youthful styling. Unfortunately, none of these advantages could outweigh the C-HR's greatest liability: an anemic engine and transmission pairing. Put bluntly, the C-HR is one of the slowest vehicles we've tested in any class.

A short two years later, the C-HR's few advantages have mostly evaporated in the face of newer rivals, pushing it out of our Top 10 rankings for subcompact SUVs. For 2020, it gains Android Auto, gets some revised front-end styling and loads up on more standard features, but these improvements aren't enough to drag the Toyota C-HR from its lowly position. In addition to its poor performance, it continues to suffer from an abundance of road and wind noise, limited cargo space, and the absence of an all-wheel-drive option.

If you're looking to step up from hatchbacks or downsize from small SUVs, we suggest passing on the C-HR in favor of our class favorites. These include the Hyundai Kona, the Kia Soul and the Honda HR-V, all of which represent better value and deliver significantly better performance than the 2020 Toyota C-HR.

Edmunds’ Expert Rating
Rated for you by America’s best test team

Our verdict

7.1 / 10
The C-HR is well built and returns good fuel economy. Unfortunately, it's slow. Very slow. This characteristic hinders what is otherwise a likable subcompact crossover SUV.

How does it drive?

7.0
It's difficult to recommend a vehicle as sluggish as the Toyota C-HR. Its four-cylinder engine simply can't muster enough power to get the C-HR going with any authority. At Edmunds' test track, we logged a 0-60 mph time of 10.6 seconds. That's slower than other small crossovers and hatchbacks. It's even slower than a Toyota Prius.

But the C-HR holds its own in other categories. The brake pedal is easy to modulate, so it's easy to stop smoothly, and the steering is easy to twirl around at low speeds and accurate in sporty situations. The C-HR is also somewhat entertaining to drive on a twisty road even if there's a distinct lack of grip from the tires.

How comfortable is it?

7.5
The C-HR's seats are well cushioned and supportive, and the suspension smooths out most bumps in the road. The cabin of the C-HR is a pleasant place to be whether you're a driver or passenger.

That said, the C-HR isn't built for less than perfect conditions. We noticed that larger patches of rough pavement can easily upset the ride quality and create a lot of noise in the cabin. It isn't very well insulated from outside noise, and any wind gusts stronger than a light breeze are quite loud inside.

How’s the interior?

7.0
Getting in and out of the C-HR is easy thanks to its elevated seating position. There's also plenty of headroom up front. The rear seats have enough room to keep regular-size adults in decent comfort, but the thick rear roof pillars may make them feel a little claustrophobic.

The C-HR's simple control layout is attractive, and the main controls are easy to operate for the most part. But some of the more advanced features such as the adaptive cruise control are a little more difficult to figure out. It's pretty easy to see out of the front of the C-HR, but those thick rear roof pillars obscure your view to the back.

How’s the tech?

7.5
The C-HR comes with an 8-inch touchscreen that is simple to read and operate through the menus. It connects with both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphones, and an effective navigation system is available. The audio system provides decent clarity, but the sound quality, especially for songs with thumping bass, quickly degrades when the volume rises.

We're fans of the driver safety aids included in the Toyota Safety Sense P (TSS-P) package, which is standard on all C-HR models. The lane-keeping alert system can be overzealous in its warnings when you're driving on a twisty road, but it's otherwise helpful. The adaptive cruise control is very good at reducing driver fatigue in heavy traffic and can bring the vehicle down to a smooth stop.

How’s the storage?

6.0
Storage space is tight inside the C-HR. Rear trunk space is about average for the class at 19 cubic feet. You can fold down the rear seats to access 36.4 cubic feet of capacity, but that figure ranks low compared to the competition. Space for small items is adequate up front, though the center console is only average size. The cupholders are on the small side and awkwardly positioned.

Planning to put kids in the back? Car seat anchors are positioned well, but there's little room to install a rear-facing child safety seat without moving the front seats forward. Overall the C-HR is compromised by its quirky shape and size, and Toyota did not bring any of its trademark smart storage solutions to the table.

How economical is it?

7.0
The EPA estimates fuel economy at 29 mpg combined (27 city/31 highway), which is about average for the class. We found the rating accurate, and even exceeded it with an average of 33.9 mpg on our 115-mile mixed-driving evaluation route.

Is it a good value?

7.0
The C-HR offers solid build quality and distinctive materials for the class. We also like the amount of standard safety equipment Toyota includes and the two free years of scheduled maintenance. But the C-HR isn't as affordably priced as some value-minded competitors.

Wildcard

7.5
The distinctive styling alone earns Toyota points for bravery. Most people fall into one of two categories: They love the C-HR's design, or they hate it. Those who like it will find the rest of the vehicle filled with personality, from swooping dashboard lines to interesting trapezoid designs pressed into the ceiling. But just about everyone will find that the lack of power can sour the driving experience.

Which C-HR does Edmunds recommend?

The midgrade XLE trim gets our recommendation. It brings keyless entry, blind-spot monitoring and larger alloy wheels at a reasonable price. Shoppers in colder climates may want to step up to the Limited, primarily for the heated leather seats.

Toyota C-HR models

The Toyota C-HR is available in three trim levels, starting with the LE, which is more competitive against other subcompact crossovers when it comes to price. The XLE adds a few niceties and safety features, while the top Limited trim gets you leather upholstery, upgraded front seats and some additional tech features. Every C-HR is powered by a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine (144 horsepower, 139 lb-ft of torque) matched to front-wheel drive and a continuously variable automatic transmission.

Standard features for the base LE trim include 17-inch steel wheels (alloys are optional), automatic LED headlights, heated mirrors, a rear spoiler, remote keyless entry, adjustable driving modes, dual-zone automatic climate control, cloth upholstery, 60/40-split folding rear seats, a cargo cover, an 8-inch touchscreen, a rearview camera, Bluetooth phone and streaming audio, a USB port, a Wi-Fi hotspot, remote vehicle controls, Apple CarPlay/Android Auto, Amazon Alexa integration, and a six-speaker audio system with satellite radio.

Several advanced safety and convenience features are also standard, including automatic high beams, adaptive cruise control, lane keeping assist, and forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking.

The XLE trim upgrades to 18-inch alloy wheels, power-folding mirrors, keyless ignition and entry, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, and blind-spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert.

The top-of-the-line Limited trim gets you adaptive headlights, foglights, leather upholstery, heated front seats, and two-way power lumbar for the driver's seat. An upgraded infotainment system that adds HD radio is available for the XLE and Limited trims.


Consumer reviews

Read what other owners think about the 2020 Toyota C-HR.

5 star reviews: 82%
4 star reviews: 9%
3 star reviews: 9%
2 star reviews: 0%
1 star reviews: 0%
Average user rating: 4.7 stars based on 11 total reviews

Trending topics in reviews

  • appearance
  • comfort
  • fuel efficiency
  • handling & steering
  • lights
  • wheels & tires
  • interior
  • doors
  • reliability & manufacturing quality
  • maintenance & parts
  • visibility
  • seats
  • road noise
  • acceleration
  • technology
  • spaciousness

Most helpful consumer reviews

5 out of 5 stars, LOVE IT!
Jen H. ,
XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)

Everything you need with perks in a stellar looking package. Love the styling, especially the back doors handle location (how unique!) Feels so sporty to drive, super comfy supportive seats with plenty of room for passengers in the back seat. I can’t say enough good things, I just want to go driving!

5 out of 5 stars, Sporty
Randall Scott,
XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)

I like the gas mileage and overall package

5 out of 5 stars, Charcoal C-HR
Britt,
XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)

Amazing sized car and great on gas mileage!

5 out of 5 stars, Best car I’ve ever had.
Joy,
LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)

I really enjoy driving my C-HR. It has such a unique design. It sits higher than my last car, a Corolla, making it easier for me to drive.

Write a review

See all 11 reviews



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MSRP$21,295 - $26,350
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Features & Specs

XLE 4dr SUV features & specs
XLE 4dr SUV
2.0L 4cyl CVT
MSRP$23,330
MPG 27 city / 31 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
TransmissionContinuously variable-speed automatic
Horsepower144 hp @ 6100 rpm
See all for sale
LE 4dr SUV features & specs
LE 4dr SUV
2.0L 4cyl CVT
MSRP$21,295
MPG 27 city / 31 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
TransmissionContinuously variable-speed automatic
Horsepower144 hp @ 6100 rpm
See all for sale
Limited 4dr SUV features & specs
Limited 4dr SUV
2.0L 4cyl CVT
MSRP$26,350
MPG 27 city / 31 hwy
SeatingSeats 5
TransmissionContinuously variable-speed automatic
Horsepower144 hp @ 6100 rpm
See all for sale
See all 2020 Toyota C-HR features & specs

Safety

Our experts’ favorite C-HR safety features:

Full-Range Dynamic Radar Cruise Control
Maintains a set distance between the C-HR and the car in front while cruise control is active. Can bring the C-HR to a complete stop.
Pre-Collision System
Warns the driver when it approaches an object in front too quickly. Automatically applies the brakes to prevent or reduce potential impacts.
Lane Departure Alert w/ Steering Assist
Alerts the driver if the C-HR wanders out of its lane and can make gentle steering corrections.

NHTSA Overall Rating 5 out of 5 stars

The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration offers independent analysis.

Frontal Barrier Crash RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Driver5 / 5
Passenger4 / 5
Side Crash RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Side Barrier RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Driver5 / 5
Passenger5 / 5
Combined Side Barrier & Pole RatingsRating
Front Seat5 / 5
Back Seat5 / 5
RolloverRating
Rollover4 / 5
Dynamic Test ResultNo Tip
Risk Of Rollover14.3%

IIHS Rating

The Insurance Institute of Highway Safety uses extensive crash tests to determine car safety.

Side Impact Test
Good
Roof Strength Test
Good
Rear Crash Protection / Head Restraint
Good
IIHS Small Overlap Front TestNot Tested
Moderate Overlap Front Test
Good

Toyota C-HR vs. the competition

Toyota C-HR vs. Hyundai Kona

The Hyundai Kona is our top-rated subcompact crossover, and for a good reason. Its turbocharged engine is noticeably quicker than the C-HR, and sharper handling makes it more enjoyable to drive, too. As with all Hyundai vehicles, you get a lot of standard features for the money, along with the most generous warranty in the industry.

Compare Toyota C-HR & Hyundai Kona features

Toyota C-HR vs. Kia Soul

The boxy-chic Kia Soul is a close second in our rankings, delivering a lot for the money. Its more squared-off shape provides more interior space than other crossovers, and you also get a ton of standard features. It certainly doesn't hurt that the Soul is also fun to drive. Keeping it from the top spot is some excessive wind and road noise on the highway and some awkward transmission responses from the top turbo model.

Compare Toyota C-HR & Kia Soul features

Toyota C-HR vs. Honda HR-V

Honda's HR-V gets high marks for its versatility, clever storage solutions, large cargo capacity and efficient engine. Unfortunately, a byproduct of its admirable fuel economy is lackluster acceleration, though it is still more responsive than the C-HR. The HR-V should also gain an advantage for shoppers in wet and cold climates with its available all-wheel drive, which the Toyota doesn't offer.

Compare Toyota C-HR & Honda HR-V features

Related C-HR Articles

FAQ

Is the Toyota C-HR a good car?

The Edmunds experts tested the 2020 C-HR both on the road and at the track, giving it a 7.1 out of 10. You probably care about Toyota C-HR fuel economy, so it's important to know that the C-HR gets an EPA-estimated 29 mpg. What about cargo capacity? When you're thinking about carrying stuff in your new car, keep in mind that the C-HR has 19.1 cubic feet of trunk space. And then there's safety and reliability. Edmunds has all the latest NHTSA and IIHS crash-test scores, plus industry-leading expert and consumer reviews to help you understand what it's like to own and maintain a Toyota C-HR. Learn more

What's new in the 2020 Toyota C-HR?

According to Edmunds’ car experts, here’s what’s new for the 2020 Toyota C-HR:

  • Revised front-end design
  • Android Auto now available
  • LED headlights and satellite radio now standard on all trims
  • Part of the first C-HR generation introduced for 2018
Learn more

Is the Toyota C-HR reliable?

To determine whether the Toyota C-HR is reliable, read Edmunds' authentic consumer reviews, which come from real owners and reveal what it's like to live with the C-HR. Look for specific complaints that keep popping up in the reviews, and be sure to compare the C-HR's average consumer rating to that of competing vehicles. Learn more

Is the 2020 Toyota C-HR a good car?

There's a lot to consider if you're wondering whether the 2020 Toyota C-HR is a good car. Edmunds' expert testing team reviewed the 2020 C-HR and gave it a 7.1 out of 10. Safety scores, fuel economy, cargo capacity and feature availability should all be factors in determining whether the 2020 C-HR is a good car for you. Learn more

How much should I pay for a 2020 Toyota C-HR?

The least-expensive 2020 Toyota C-HR is the 2020 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT). Including destination charge, it arrives with a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of about $21,295.

Other versions include:

  • XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) which starts at $23,330
  • LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) which starts at $21,295
  • Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) which starts at $26,350
Learn more

What are the different models of Toyota C-HR?

If you're interested in the Toyota C-HR, the next question is, which C-HR model is right for you? C-HR variants include XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), and Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT). For a full list of C-HR models, check out Edmunds’ Features & Specs page. Learn more

More about the 2020 Toyota C-HR

2020 Toyota C-HR Overview

The 2020 Toyota C-HR is offered in the following submodels: C-HR SUV. Available styles include XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), and Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT).

What do people think of the 2020 Toyota C-HR?

Consumer ratings and reviews are also available for the 2020 Toyota C-HR and all its trim types. Overall, Edmunds users rate the 2020 C-HR 4.7 on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. Edmunds consumer reviews allow users to sift through aggregated consumer reviews to understand what other drivers are saying about any vehicle in our database. Detailed rating breakdowns (including performance, comfort, value, interior, exterior design, build quality, and reliability) are available as well to provide shoppers with a comprehensive understanding of why customers like the 2020 C-HR.

Edmunds Expert Reviews

Edmunds experts have compiled a robust series of ratings and reviews for the 2020 Toyota C-HR and all model years in our database. Our rich content includes expert reviews and recommendations for the 2020 C-HR featuring deep dives into trim levels and features, performance, mpg, safety, interior, and driving. Edmunds also offers expert ratings, road test and performance data, long-term road tests, first-drive reviews, video reviews and more.

Our Review Process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.

What's a good price for a New 2020 Toyota C-HR?

2020 Toyota C-HR Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)

The 2020 Toyota C-HR Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $28,104. The average price paid for a new 2020 Toyota C-HR Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is trending $3,410 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,410 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $24,694.

The average savings for the 2020 Toyota C-HR Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is 12.1% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 14 2020 Toyota C-HR Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2020 Toyota C-HR XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)

The 2020 Toyota C-HR XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $24,774. The average price paid for a new 2020 Toyota C-HR XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is trending $3,241 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,241 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $21,533.

The average savings for the 2020 Toyota C-HR XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is 13.1% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 12 2020 Toyota C-HR XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

2020 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)

The 2020 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $22,739. The average price paid for a new 2020 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is trending $3,144 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $3,144 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $19,595.

The average savings for the 2020 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is 13.8% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 13 2020 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

Which 2020 Toyota C-HRS are available in my area?

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2020 Toyota C-HR for sale near. There are currently 129 new 2020 C-HRS listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $22,470 and mileage as low as 0 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a car from our massive database to find cheap vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the 2020 Toyota C-HR. Then select Edmunds special offers, perks, deals, and incentives to contact the dealer of your choice and save up to $3,645 on a used or CPO 2020 C-HR available from a dealership near you.

Can't find a new 2020 Toyota C-HRs you want in your area? Consider a broader search.

Find a new Toyota C-HR for sale - 6 great deals out of 21 listings starting at $13,473.

Find a new Toyota for sale - 1 great deals out of 12 listings starting at $13,551.

Why trust Edmunds?

Edmunds has deep data on over 6 million new, used, and certified pre-owned vehicles, including rich, trim-level features and specs information like: MSRP, average price paid, warranty information (basic, drivetrain, and maintenance), features (upholstery, bluetooth, navigation, heated seating, cooled seating, cruise control, parking assistance, keyless ignition, satellite radio, folding rears seats ,run flat tires, wheel type, tire size, wheel tire, sunroof, etc.), vehicle specifications (engine cylinder count, drivetrain, engine power, engine torque, engine displacement, transmission), fuel economy (city, highway, combined, fuel capacity, range), vehicle dimensions (length, width, seating capacity, cargo space), car safety, true cost to own. Edmunds also provides tools to allow shopper to compare vehicles to similar models of their choosing by warranty, interior features, exterior features, specifications, fuel economy, vehicle dimensions, consumer rating, edmunds rating, and color.

Should I lease or buy a 2020 Toyota C-HR?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

Check out Toyota lease specials