2021 Toyota C-HR

MSRP range: $21,695 - $26,750
4.5 out of 5 stars(8)
MSRP$23,752
Edmunds suggests you pay$23,536

What Should I Pay
1 for sale near you
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At a Glance:
  • 6 Colors
  • 4 Trims
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2021 Toyota C-HR Review

  • Sporty handling makes it fun to zip around turns
  • Comes standard with plenty of features, including safety tech
  • Swoopy styling helps it stand out
  • Unlike most rivals, it doesn't offer all-wheel drive
  • Even in this slow class, acceleration is lethargic
  • Pervasive road and engine noise in the cabin
  • Minimal cargo space, even for its small segment
  • New Nightshade Edition available
  • Toyota Safety Sense 2.5 suite of safety features and driver aids now standard on all trims
  • Part of the first C-HR generation introduced for 2018

The 2021 C-HR is an extra-small crossover SUV that sits at the bottom of Toyota's lineup. It serves as an entry-level model akin to the Yaris or the Corolla. Like everything in this class, the C-HR counts flashy styling as part of its appeal, though we're split on how well the design works in person.

Changes for 2021 are limited to the addition of more standard driver aids and a new trim level, though the C-HR had an update in 2020 that brought with it new front-end styling and more features, including LED headlights and Android Auto smartphone compatibility. Overall, the C-HR is a decent choice but lags behind rivals such as the Hyundai Kona, Kia Soul and Mazda CX-30. Learn more about the C-HR's strengths and weaknesses by reading the categories of our Expert Rating.

EdmundsEdmunds' Expert RatingThe Edmunds Vehicle Testing Team evaluates a fresh batch of vehicles every week, pairing objective assessments at our test track with real-world driving on city streets, freeways and winding roads. The data we gather results in our Expert Ratings. They’re based on 30-plus scores that cover every aspect of the automotive experience.
Rated for you by America’s best test team
The C-HR is well built and returns good fuel economy. Unfortunately, it's slow. Very slow. This characteristic hinders what is otherwise a likable subcompact crossover SUV.
It's difficult to recommend a vehicle as sluggish as the Toyota C-HR. Its four-cylinder engine simply can't muster enough power to get the C-HR going with any authority. At Edmunds' test track, we logged a 0-60 mph time of 10.6 seconds. That's slower than other small crossovers and hatchbacks. It's even slower than a Toyota Prius.

But the C-HR holds its own in other categories. The brake pedal is easy to modulate, so it's easy to stop smoothly, and the steering is easy to twirl around at low speeds and accurate in sporty situations. The C-HR is also somewhat entertaining to drive on a twisty road even if there's a distinct lack of grip from the tires.
The C-HR's seats are well cushioned and supportive, and the suspension smooths out most bumps in the road. The cabin is a pleasant place to be whether you're a driver or passenger.

That said, the C-HR isn't built for less than perfect conditions. We noticed that larger patches of rough pavement can easily upset the ride quality and create a lot of noise in the cabin. It isn't very well insulated from outside noise, and any wind gusts stronger than a light breeze are quite loud inside.
Getting in and out of the C-HR is easy thanks to its elevated seating position. There's also plenty of headroom up front. The rear seats have enough room to keep regular-size adults in decent comfort, but the thick rear roof pillars might make them feel a little claustrophobic.

The C-HR's simple control layout is attractive, and the main controls are easy to operate for the most part. But some of the more advanced features such as the adaptive cruise control are a little more difficult to figure out. It's pretty easy to see out of the front of the C-HR, but those thick rear roof pillars obscure your view to the back.
The C-HR comes with an 8-inch touchscreen that is simple to read and operate through the menus. It connects with both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto via smartphones, and an effective navigation system is available. The audio system provides decent clarity, but the sound quality, especially for songs with thumping bass, quickly degrades when the volume rises.

We're fans of the driver safety aids included in the Toyota Safety Sense 2.5 suite, which is standard on all C-HR models. The lane-keeping alert system can be overzealous in its warnings when you're driving on a twisty road, but it's otherwise helpful. The adaptive cruise control is very good at reducing driver fatigue in heavy traffic and can bring the vehicle down to a smooth stop.
Storage space is tight inside the C-HR. Rear trunk space is about average for the class at 19 cubic feet. You can fold down the rear seats to access 37 cubic feet of capacity, but that figure ranks low compared to the competition. Space for small items is adequate up front, though the center console is only average size. The cupholders are on the small side and awkwardly positioned.

Planning to put kids in the back? Car seat anchors are positioned well, but there's little room to install a rear-facing child safety seat without moving the front seats forward. Overall the C-HR is compromised by its quirky shape and size, and Toyota did not bring any of its trademark smart storage solutions to the table.
The EPA estimates fuel economy at 29 mpg combined (27 city/31 highway), which is about average for the class. We found the rating accurate, and even exceeded it with an average of 33.9 mpg on our 115-mile mixed-driving evaluation route.
The C-HR offers solid build quality and distinctive materials for the class. We also like the amount of standard safety equipment Toyota includes and the two years of free scheduled maintenance. But the C-HR isn't as affordably priced as some value-minded competitors.
The distinctive styling alone earns Toyota points for bravery. Most people fall into one of two categories: They love the C-HR's design, or they hate it. Those who like it will find the rest of the vehicle filled with personality, from swooping dashboard lines to interesting trapezoid designs pressed into the ceiling. But just about everyone will find that the lack of power can sour the driving experience.

Which C-HR does Edmunds recommend?

We suggest going with the midlevel XLE trim. Compared to the base LE trim, you get keyless entry, blind-spot monitoring and larger alloy wheels for not much more money.

Toyota C-HR models

The 2021 Toyota C-HR is available in four trim levels: LE, XLE, Nightshade and Limited. All C-HRs are powered by a four-cylinder engine that produces 144 horsepower. A continuously variable automatic transmission is standard, as is front-wheel drive. Unlike some other small crossover SUVs, all-wheel drive is unavailable on the C-HR.

LE
Features on the base LE trim include:

  • LED headlights
  • 17-inch steel wheels
  • Keyless entry
  • Dual-zone automatic climate control
  • Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and Amazon Alexa integration
  • 8-inch touchscreen display

The C-HR also comes with a collection of advanced driver safety features (Toyota Safety Sense 2.5):

    • Forward collision mitigation (warns you of an impending collision and applies the brakes in certain scenarios)
    • Lane keeping assist (alerts you if the vehicle begins to drift out of its lane and makes minor steering corrections to help keep the vehicle centered in its lane)
    • Automatic high beams
    • Adaptive cruise control (adjusts speed to maintain a constant distance between the vehicle and the car in front)
    • Road sign recognition

XLE
The midlevel XLE trims includes all of the LE's features and adds:

  • 18-inch alloy wheels
  • Body-colored exterior mirrors, door handles and trim
  • Keyless entry on all doors with push-button start
  • Leather-wrapped steering wheel
  • Blind-spot monitor with rear cross-traffic alert (warns you if a vehicle is in your blind spot during a lane change or while reversing)

Nightshade
Features on the Nightshade trim mirror those on the XLE. Consider this an appearance package. Changes include:

  • Black 18-inch alloy wheels
  • Black chin spoiler and badges
  • Available two-tone paint with a black roof
  • Black interior trim

Limited
The top-tier Limited trim builds off the XLE with:

  • Adaptive LED headlights (swivel as you turn the steering wheel for better illumination in curves)
  • Unique 18-inch wheels
  • Available two-tone paint
  • Chrome and piano black exterior trim
  • Leather upholstery
  • Power-adjustable, heated front seats
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Consumer reviews

Read what other owners think about the 2021 Toyota C-HR.

Average user rating: 4.5 stars
8 total reviews
5 star reviews: 87%
4 star reviews: 0%
3 star reviews: 0%
2 star reviews: 0%
1 star reviews: 13%

Trending topics in reviews

  • appearance
  • ride quality
  • safety
  • driving experience
  • engine
  • visibility
  • seats
  • comfort
  • interior

Most helpful consumer reviews

5/5 stars, Best Toyota I have owned so far
Mike,
XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)
This is my third Toyota (Yaris, Corrolla(2)) and thought we would try something different. We got the premium package Bronze oxide and its a great car. Rides high and smooth. We really enjoy driving the car and the newest safety features are a good improvement over the 2017 we had. Especially like the blind spot indicators on the mirror. Some reviewers say the engine is lacking but I am not a race car driver and don't need to do 120 to Costco on the weekend. I can pass any cars/trucks I need to on the highway so that is all I need. We would recommend this car and look forward to driving it more.
5/5 stars, Surprisingly comfortable and refined for its size
PaulC,
XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)
Rented an XLE for a week and drove it 710 miles. I was really surprized this little car offers near 2021 Camry levels of ride comfort and quietness and far better seat comfort. After 2 straight hours of freeway driving I did not feel sore because the front seats of the CH-R somehow make the pressure points vanish. The newer Camry's, by contrast, have hard, fatigue inducing seats., Like the new Camrys, the CH-R feels isolated from alot of road harshness and vibration which also helps reduce long distance driving fatigue. The interior noise level of the CH-R at freeway speeds is also near Camry-like - a pleasant surprise for such a small car. Around town the CH-R is fun because it's so nimble. My only minor gripe with the car is the right rear quarter visibility is poor and the highway fuel economy is mediocre (31 MPG vs 39 for the Camry). However, the CH-R's 4 cyl engine is an old school design that should be less costly to maintain as compared to the Camry's high tech 4 cyl. I should also mention the CH-R is also smoother and quieter riding than the larger Rav4 and it's seats are more comfortable to boot. For these reasons, I would never consider buying a Rav4 (too truck-like), but I would definately want to buy a CH-R knowing it could double as both a grocery getter and comfortable long distance cruiser.
5/5 stars, Safe for first time drivers
D. De Leon,
LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)
It’s totally recommended! Price is cheap, very reliable, and of course it’s safe for first time drivers like me. It’s almost the same feature compare to XLE but the only difference is LE doesn’t have Smart Key and it’s steel wheel compared to alloy wheel. Also, cool features like CarPlay; also the warning brake when you’re close to a car and your speed wasn’t decreasing; the lane switching with automatic steering assist although it’s sometimes annoying because every turn you need to turn signal lights on (which is the right thing to do) so people around you knows where you’re going; it also know what speed limit the place is, also if there’s a stop sign; and it also has automatic high beams. So far owning this car gives me the safety I need.
5/5 stars, love this CAR!!!!!!
lynda j,
XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)
Love everything about this car....it is totally perfect for the non herd follower.....after reading may of the professional reviews was a little leery....like the guy from consumer report did not like where the back door handle is placed.....really:) that is one of my favorite things!!!! this is a fabulous and fun car....fyi my other car is a 2012 mini cooper turbo clubman......i like iconic cars.....enjoy your ch r when you can find one to buy......

2021 Toyota C-HR videos

this is the Toyota CHR it's a subcompact made to transport five people get good fuel economy and look pretty stylish - question is what happens if it were a race car with 600 horsepower rather than just build a show car Twitter and partnered DG spec wanted to build a race car that actually works that goal meant a thorough reengineering of the car from racing slicks brakes and suspension to a replacement of the stock engine and CVT with a more durable engine and 5-speed manual transmission both built to withstand upwards of 600 horsepower the low front splitter and massive rear wing can create as much as 300 pounds of downforce so much that the team had to add bracing to the lift gate so it wouldn't warp under the load the interiors been stripped down to bare metal there's a roll cage but there are no front windows as Racing prepared as a CHR maybe there's only one in existence and we aren't the only people driving it today so there are some warnings to preserve the lifespan of the drivetrain the engine wasn't making full power and we were told to shift delicately and smoothly we couldn't go full throttle in first or second gear and there would be someone supervising us from the passenger seat and talking to us on the radio and we'd only get one lap [Music] it's like my 72 Chevy c10 so I just got out of the art tooned Toyota CHR and the thing that you don't realize about driving a car like this is it's just sensory overload the thing doesn't have windows it's really loud inside you've got somebody talking into your ears through a through your radio and there's so much to take in at once it's kind of weird driving position you're up a little higher but the steering is doesn't have a lot of feel but it's very quick and the car is moving very fast you know we're down a lot less in terms of horsepower versus the 600 horsepower they say it makes in like full race kill mode they have it a lot lower because they have a lot of people like me cycling through and they don't want to grenade the engine but still like I'm comfortable with where it's at for my first lap here at big willow there's a lot of tire on that car and a lot of braking capability on that car so it's being confident enough to approach those limits and learning how to approach them this is a car that has downforce a so they learn how to trust that and know what that feels like and it's one of the situations we have to go fast or in order to stick harder to the ground I'm not even approaching those limits yet they're saying this thing can do you know upwards of 150 and to turn eight here at big willow which is an absurd amount of speed and I wasn't even anywhere near that because it's a unique driving experience versus a traditional car one of the things if keep in mind is I'm shifting very gingerly because this is essentially a stock transmission it's been treated in a couple ways to make it stronger and more durable but the skier set is almost like what you get in a standard Scion tC so with that my shifting is not something you just bang the gear because that's how you break the transmission and likewise with clutch you see it to be very smooth because they're relying on a lot of Oh a hardware that can't with standard was not designed to withstand 600 horsepower and you know drivers like myself cycling through it over and over and over again overall a really cool experience and I hope we get to go back out again soon [Music] if you like what you see here hit subscribe or check out more on engine YouTube channel

Driving the Race-Prepped, 600-Horsepower Toyota C-HR R-Tuned

NOTE: This video is about the 2018 Toyota C-HR, but since the 2021 Toyota C-HR is part of the same generation, our earlier analysis still applies.


Features & Specs

Base MSRP
$21,695
MPG & Fuel
27 City / 31 Hwy / 29 Combined
Fuel Tank Capacity: 13.2 gal. capacity
Seating
5 seats
Drivetrain
Type: front wheel drive
Transmission: Continuously variable-speed automatic
Engine
Inline 4 cylinder
Horsepower: 144 hp @ 6100 rpm
Torque: 139 lb-ft @ 3900 rpm
Basic Warranty
3 yr./ 36000 mi.
Dimensions
Length: 172.6 in. / Height: 61.6 in.
Overall Width with Mirrors: N/A
Overall Width without Mirrors: 70.7 in.
Curb Weight: 3300 lbs.
Cargo Capacity, All Seats In Place: 19.1 cu.ft.

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Safety

Our experts’ favorite C-HR safety features:

Full-Range Dynamic Radar Cruise Control
Maintains a set distance between the C-HR and the car in front while cruise control is active. Can bring the C-HR to a complete stop.
Pre-Collision System
Warns the driver when it approaches an object in front too quickly. Automatically applies the brakes to prevent or reduce potential impacts.
Lane Departure Alert w/ Steering Assist
Alerts the driver if the C-HR wanders out of its lane and can make gentle steering corrections.

NHTSA Overall Rating 5 out of 5 stars

The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration offers independent analysis.

Frontal Barrier Crash RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Driver5 / 5
Passenger4 / 5
Side Crash RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Side Barrier RatingRating
Overall5 / 5
Driver5 / 5
Passenger5 / 5
Combined Side Barrier & Pole RatingsRating
Front Seat5 / 5
Back Seat5 / 5
RolloverRating
Rollover4 / 5
Dynamic Test ResultNo Tip
Risk Of Rollover14.3%

IIHS Rating

The Insurance Institute of Highway Safety uses extensive crash tests to determine car safety.

Side Impact Test
Good
Roof Strength Test
Good
Rear Crash Protection / Head Restraint
Good
IIHS Small Overlap Front TestNot Tested
Moderate Overlap Front Test
Good



Toyota C-HR vs. the competition

2021 Toyota C-HR

2021 Toyota C-HR

2021 Mazda CX-30

2021 Mazda CX-30

Toyota C-HR vs. Mazda CX-30

The Mazda CX-30 is one of the newest vehicles in its class. It's not much larger on the outside than the C-HR, but the Mazda offers more interior space, especially in the rear seat. The CX-30's interior and exterior design gives it a premium feel you won't find elsewhere in the class. It's more powerful too, and unlike the Toyota, the CX-30 offers all-wheel drive. Read Edmunds' long-term road test of the Mazda CX-30.

Compare Toyota C-HR & Mazda CX-30 features 

Toyota C-HR vs. Hyundai Kona

Like the C-HR, the Hyundai Kona definitely stands out in a crowd. The bold exterior design is paired with a somewhat plain interior, but it's functional and spacious. The Kona, unlike the C-HR, is available with both all-wheel drive and a turbocharged engine. We also like the Kona's surprisingly nimble handling and the array of features you get for relatively little cash.

Compare Toyota C-HR & Hyundai Kona features 

Toyota C-HR vs. Kia Soul

The Kia Soul is more of a wagon than an SUV, but that doesn't make it any less practical. The styling is distinct though not as divisive as the C-HR's, and the upright shape means there's more room for people and cargo in the Soul than just about everything else in the class. We wish the powertrain was a little more refined, especially the upgraded turbocharged engine. Like the C-HR, the Soul isn't available with all-wheel drive.

Compare Toyota C-HR & Kia Soul features 

2021 Toyota C-HR First Impressions

What is the C-HR?

The 2021 C-HR is a compact crossover that sits at the bottom of Toyota's lineup, serving as an entry-level model akin to the Yaris or the Corolla. Like everything in this class, the C-HR packs flashy styling, though we're split on how well the design works in person. We expect few if any changes for 2021, though the C-HR had a refresh in 2020 that brought with it new front-end styling and more features, including LED headlights and Android Auto smartphone compatibility.

Still, that wasn't quite enough to drive the C-HR up in our compact crossover rankings. A gutless engine and lack of all-wheel drive hold it back in this class. If you're in the market for a small, stylish crossover, consider our top-ranked choices in its class: the Hyundai Kona, Kia Soul and Honda HR-V.

The C-HR should be available in three trim levels: LE, XLE and Limited, and all C-HRs use the same powertrain. Features on the C-HR include keyless entry, dual-zone climate control and an 8-inch touchscreen display.

EdmundsEdmunds says

Despite an update in 2020, the Toyota C-HR still feels a step or two behind the class leaders. A weak engine, no available all-wheel drive and a cramped interior hold the C-HR back.


FAQ

Is the Toyota C-HR a good car?

The Edmunds experts tested the 2021 C-HR both on the road and at the track, giving it a 7.1 out of 10. You probably care about Toyota C-HR fuel economy, so it's important to know that the C-HR gets an EPA-estimated 29 mpg. What about cargo capacity? When you're thinking about carrying stuff in your new car, keep in mind that the C-HR has 19.1 cubic feet of trunk space. And then there's safety and reliability. Edmunds has all the latest NHTSA and IIHS crash-test scores, plus industry-leading expert and consumer reviews to help you understand what it's like to own and maintain a Toyota C-HR. Learn more

What's new in the 2021 Toyota C-HR?

According to Edmunds’ car experts, here’s what’s new for the 2021 Toyota C-HR:

  • New Nightshade Edition available
  • Toyota Safety Sense 2.5 suite of safety features and driver aids now standard on all trims
  • Part of the first C-HR generation introduced for 2018
Learn more

Is the Toyota C-HR reliable?

To determine whether the Toyota C-HR is reliable, read Edmunds' authentic consumer reviews, which come from real owners and reveal what it's like to live with the C-HR. Look for specific complaints that keep popping up in the reviews, and be sure to compare the C-HR's average consumer rating to that of competing vehicles. Learn more

Is the 2021 Toyota C-HR a good car?

There's a lot to consider if you're wondering whether the 2021 Toyota C-HR is a good car. Edmunds' expert testing team reviewed the 2021 C-HR and gave it a 7.1 out of 10. Safety scores, fuel economy, cargo capacity and feature availability should all be factors in determining whether the 2021 C-HR is a good car for you. Learn more

How much should I pay for a 2021 Toyota C-HR?

The least-expensive 2021 Toyota C-HR is the 2021 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT). Including destination charge, it arrives with a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of about $21,695.

Other versions include:

  • LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) which starts at $21,695
  • XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) which starts at $23,730
  • Nightshade Edition 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) which starts at $24,495
  • Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) which starts at $26,750
Learn more

What are the different models of Toyota C-HR?

If you're interested in the Toyota C-HR, the next question is, which C-HR model is right for you? C-HR variants include LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), Nightshade Edition 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), and Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT). For a full list of C-HR models, check out Edmunds’ Features & Specs page. Learn more

More about the 2021 Toyota C-HR

2021 Toyota C-HR Overview

The 2021 Toyota C-HR is offered in the following submodels: C-HR SUV. Available styles include LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), and Nightshade Edition 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT). Toyota C-HR models are available with a 2.0 L-liter gas engine, with output up to 144 hp, depending on engine type. The 2021 Toyota C-HR comes with front wheel drive. Available transmissions include: continuously variable-speed automatic. The 2021 Toyota C-HR comes with a 3 yr./ 36000 mi. basic warranty, a 2 yr./ unlimited mi. roadside warranty, and a 5 yr./ 60000 mi. powertrain warranty.

What do people think of the 2021 Toyota C-HR?

Consumer ratings and reviews are also available for the 2021 Toyota C-HR and all its trim types. Overall, Edmunds users rate the 2021 C-HR 4.5 on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. Edmunds consumer reviews allow users to sift through aggregated consumer reviews to understand what other drivers are saying about any vehicle in our database. Detailed rating breakdowns (including performance, comfort, value, interior, exterior design, build quality, and reliability) are available as well to provide shoppers with a comprehensive understanding of why customers like the 2021 C-HR.

Edmunds Expert Reviews

Edmunds experts have compiled a robust series of ratings and reviews for the 2021 Toyota C-HR and all model years in our database. Our rich content includes expert reviews and recommendations for the 2021 C-HR featuring deep dives into trim levels and features, performance, mpg, safety, interior, and driving. Edmunds also offers expert ratings, road test and performance data, long-term road tests, first-drive reviews, video reviews and more.

Our Review Process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.

What's a good price for a New 2021 Toyota C-HR?

2021 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)

The 2021 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $23,752. The average price paid for a new 2021 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is trending $216 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $216 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $23,536.

The average savings for the 2021 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is 0.9% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 1 2021 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Toyota C-HR XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)

The 2021 Toyota C-HR XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $25,793. The average price paid for a new 2021 Toyota C-HR XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is trending $191 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $191 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $25,602.

The average savings for the 2021 Toyota C-HR XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is 0.7% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 16 2021 Toyota C-HR XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Toyota C-HR Nightshade Edition 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)

The 2021 Toyota C-HR Nightshade Edition 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $26,343. The average price paid for a new 2021 Toyota C-HR Nightshade Edition 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is trending $183 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $183 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $26,160.

The average savings for the 2021 Toyota C-HR Nightshade Edition 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is 0.7% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 1 2021 Toyota C-HR Nightshade Edition 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

2021 Toyota C-HR Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT)

The 2021 Toyota C-HR Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $29,124. The average price paid for a new 2021 Toyota C-HR Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is trending $149 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

Edmunds members save an average of $149 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $28,975.

The average savings for the 2021 Toyota C-HR Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) is 0.5% below the MSRP.

Available Inventory:

We are showing 7 2021 Toyota C-HR Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT) vehicle(s) available in the in the Ashburn area.

Which 2021 Toyota C-HRS are available in my area?

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2021 Toyota C-HR for sale near. There are currently 36 new 2021 C-HRS listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $23,407 and mileage as low as 0 miles. Simply research the type of car you're interested in and then select a car from our massive database to find cheap vehicles for sale near you. Once you have identified a used vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the 2021 Toyota C-HR. Then select Edmunds special offers, perks, deals, and incentives to contact the dealer of your choice and save up to $500 on a used or CPO 2021 C-HR available from a dealership near you.

Can't find a new 2021 Toyota C-HRs you want in your area? Consider a broader search.

Find a new Toyota for sale - 5 great deals out of 13 listings starting at $25,578.

Why trust Edmunds?

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What is the MPG of a 2021 Toyota C-HR?

2021 Toyota C-HR LE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), continuously variable-speed automatic, regular unleaded
29 compined MPG,
27 city MPG/31 highway MPG

2021 Toyota C-HR XLE 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), continuously variable-speed automatic, regular unleaded
29 compined MPG,
27 city MPG/31 highway MPG

2021 Toyota C-HR Limited 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl CVT), continuously variable-speed automatic, regular unleaded
29 compined MPG,
27 city MPG/31 highway MPG

EPA Est. MPG29
TransmissionContinuously variable-speed automatic
Drive Trainfront wheel drive
Displacement2.0 L
Passenger Volume105.1 cu.ft.
Wheelbase103.9 in.
Length172.6 in.
WidthN/A
Height61.6 in.
Curb Weight3300 lbs.

Should I lease or buy a 2021 Toyota C-HR?

Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

Check out Toyota lease specials