2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab

What’s new

  • The Sierra is fully redesigned for 2019
  • Part of the fourth Sierra generation introduced for 2019

Pros & Cons

  • Several available powertrains for various towing and hauling needs
  • Long cabin provides excellent rear legroom
  • Lots of in-bed tie-down points and massive bed capacity
  • New touchscreen display is attractive and easy to use
  • Interior design and cabin controls look dated
  • Has a rougher ride than primary rivals
  • Quality of some cabin materials is subpar
  • Extra-large center stack takes up lots of cabin space
MSRP Starting at
$29,600

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Which Sierra 1500 does Edmunds recommend?

While the Denali trim is popular, we recommend first taking a hard look at the SLT. The SLT is available with a long list of options and can be optioned with the same 6.2-liter V8 that's available in the Denali. We also recommend sticking with the SLT's 18- or 20-inch wheels rather than the optional 22-inch wheels in the interests of ride quality.

Edmunds' Expert Review

Overall rating

7.3 / 10

Sharing nearly everything with the Chevrolet Silverado, the GMC Sierra full-size pickup has suffered from an identity crisis in recent years. There simply hasn't been much difference between the offerings of the two brands. While the GMC brand proffers somewhat pricier and more feature-laden vehicles than Chevrolet, the differences have ultimately been subtle.

GMC hopes to more clearly differentiate the two pickups with the introduction of the 2019 Sierra 1500. To wit, the 2019 model has unique sheet metal and will be available with a carbon-fiber bed and a multiconfigurable tailgate. Optional retractable side steps that can pivot rearward to aid bed access are another GMC exclusive. And while the off-road-focused Sierra AT4 variant is largely similar to the Silverado Trail Boss, the Sierra AT4 will be available with the most powerful engine, the 6.2-liter V8. The Trail Boss isn't available with the 6.2-liter.

Of course, the Sierra and the Silverado are still much more alike than different. Both share the same five powertrains, frames, cabs and most of the interior. The latter is perhaps the biggest drawback. We're just not enamored with the overall design or the quality of materials. The Sierra plays to a more affluent audience with exclusive features, but it might not be enough to stake out a different fate than its Silverado brother.

Notably, we picked the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 as one of Edmunds' Best Trucks and Best Gas Mileage Trucks for this year.

2019 GMC Sierra 1500 models

The 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 is available in six trim levels: base, SLE, Elevation, SLT, AT4 and Denali. They are available in various cab and bed configurations. The base is relatively sparsely equipped, though a few options are available. For the typical truck buyer, we recommend buyers look to the SLE trim level at a minimum because it has features beyond what you'd find in a work-only truck.

The version that strikes the best balance between amenities and functionality is the SLT trim level, while the Elevation is a cosmetic package available only in a double-cab configuration. Meanwhile, the AT4 offers an edge in off-road capability, and the range-topping Denali packs on the luxury-oriented features.

Configurations are as follows: Regular cabs are offered with a standard bed (6 feet 7 inches) or an extended bed (8 feet); double cabs come only with the standard bed; and crew cabs are available with a standard bed or a short bed (5 feet 9 inches). Be aware that not all trim levels are available with all configurations. All cab configurations are available with four-wheel drive.

The base Sierra comes with a 4.3-liter V6 (285 horsepower, 305 pound-feet of torque), a six-speed automatic transmission, 17-inch steel wheels, automatic xenon headlamps, power locks, a locking tailgate, power windows, air conditioning, cruise control, a rearview camera, a tilt-only steering wheel, Bluetooth, a 7-inch touchscreen interface, USB connectivity, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay integration, and a six-speaker sound system.

The Sierra Convenience package adds remote keyless entry, a remote-locking tailgate, heated power mirrors, a 110-volt AC outlet and LED cargo box lighting. The Elevation trim includes those items plus special 20-inch black alloy wheels, LED foglights and body-colored exterior trim.

The SLE trim level adds 17-inch alloy wheels, a damped tailgate, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and an upgraded 8-inch touchscreen.

Many more options are available on the SLE. A new turbocharged 2.7-liter four-cylinder (310 hp, 348 lb-ft of torque) is an option. The SLE's Convenience package adds a rear window defogger, keyless ignition and entry, dual-zone climate control, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, a power-adjustable driver's seat, heated front seats, a heated steering wheel, an upgraded infotainment system, and second-row USB charge ports.

Other options include leather upholstery, a full center console, a power-adjustable front passenger seat and wireless smartphone charging.

Stepping up to the SLT, our trim level of choice, nets you much of the above plus a standard 5.3-liter V8 (355 hp, 383 lb-ft of torque), a locking rear differential, a MultiPro configurable tailgate, a trailer brake controller and trailering package, power-folding and heated mirrors, and driver-seat memory settings. A 6.2-liter V8 (420 hp, 460 lb-ft) with a 10-speed automatic is optional.

GMC offers a Driver Alert 1 package for SLE and higher trims. It includes driver assistance features such as parking sensors, blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert. There's also the Driver Alert 2 package that further adds forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking and lane keeping assist.

GMC gives the AT4 trim similar features to the SLT but with a 2-inch suspension lift, standard four-wheel drive with a two-speed transfer case, a skid plates, Rancho shock absorbers, 18-inch wheels with all-terrain tires (20-inch wheels available), hill descent control and a terrain-selectable traction control system.

At the top of the range is the Denali, which comes with most of the features available on lower trim levels and has all of the available driver assistance features. It also adds a head-up display, a rear camera mirror, exclusive adaptive suspension dampers, 20-inch wheels and unique interior appointments. The MultiPro power assist steps are only available on the Denali.

Trim tested

Each vehicle typically comes in multiple versions that are fundamentally similar. The ratings in this review are based on our full test of the GMC Sierra 1500 Denali Crew Cab Short Bed (6.2L V8 | 10-speed automatic | 4WD | 5-foot-9-inch bed).

Scorecard

Overall7.3 / 10
Driving7.5
Comfort7.5
Interior7.5
Utility8.0
Technology7.5

Driving

7.5
There's no replacement for displacement, and the optional V8 is a wonderful engine. We wish the brake pedal feel wasn't so lethargic. Handling, too, lacks any real edge, even in Sport mode. But if power is all you need, then the Denali is a worthy consideration.

Acceleration

8.5
With the larger engine option, the Denali has plenty of power, and the 10-speed transmission upshifts quickly. To get the fastest launch, we put it in 4-Hi to maximize traction and selected Sport mode. In Edmunds testing, 0-60 mph took 6.2 seconds, which is quick for a full-size truck.

Braking

6.5
The Sierra stopped from 60 mph in 128 feet in our testing, which is better than average for the full-size truck segment. But the pedal feedback is wooden and lacks initial bite. Although the brakes have power, the brake feel and feedback to make precise stops at all speed ranges just isn't there.

Steering

7.0
The steering weighting is light, with a very small numb area on-center. The steering ratio is slow and requires a lot of effort to enact a direction change. Sport mode reduces assist, making the weighting heavier, and feels more appropriate for this truck. Feedback from the wheel is generally good.

Handling

6.5
The Denali's suspension tuning is firm, but the truck turns into corners sluggishly. Sport mode stiffens up the adjustable dampers and livens turn-in. Regardless of suspension mode, body roll is apparent on longer turns. The Denali feels even bigger than it is, which contributes to its ponderous feel.

Drivability

8.0
The big V8 makes a lot of power and is more than willing to show it with an overreacting head-snapping initial response. Once it's going, the transmission is smooth and moves through the gears quickly. Large throttle requests can result in a delay as the transmission drops down four or even five gears.

Off-road

7.5
There's a dedicated off-road mode in the Traction Select system that allows additional wheelspin and a smoother initial throttle response in low-traction situations. The head-up display and dash also show vehicle inclination and roll angle. A button controller is used to shift the transfer case.

Comfort

7.5
The Denali is aiming to be a premium truck but, aside from the comfy seats and effective climate control system, we don't see what the fuss is about. Our test truck's 22-inch wheels produced a lot of tire noise over rough terrain.

Seat comfort

7.5
The Denali's seat bottoms are flat and have minimal bolstering, but the seatbacks are well-contoured. These seats fit most people well, and they're comfortable for long trips. The rear seats are firmer, with less support, but at least the rear bench is wide.

Ride comfort

6.0
The Denali's ride feels firm and it shimmies over freeway expansion joints and other small, repeating bumps. On smoother roads, you can still feel smaller bumps, though larger bumps are absorbed. In Sport mode, you'll notice a busier ride, with more body movement caused by sharper bumps.

Noise & vibration

7.5
Depending on the road surface, the main source of noise will come from either the tires or wind. Grainy road surfaces tend to be the noisiest. On smoother roads, wind noise is never loud enough to be offensive. Most will find the sound from the 6.2-liter V8 to be pleasing to the ear.

Climate control

8.0
Dual-zone automatic climate control system uses well-marked knobs and buttons for control and works well. We wish the buttons were bigger, especially the seat heating and ventilation controls, though we appreciate the ability to adjust the heat for the seatback separately from the bottom.

Interior

7.5
Purposeful and without frills, the Sierra Denali is designed for ease of use. It's roomy and easy to get in and out of. Shorter drivers may not like the tall hood and the relationship between the steering wheel and the seat when the seat is raised.

Ease of use

7.5
Previous Sierra owners will feel right at home since there's hasn't been much innovation inside the cabin. We like the switches, and all the knobs are well-sized. Oddly, the Traction Select knob is unlabeled, and most of the push buttons are just a little smaller than we'd expect from a full-size pickup.

Getting in/getting out

8.0
The grab handles and large door openings make getting in and out a cinch, even when parked in tight quarters. Our Denali test truck came with power-retractable side steps. Shorter drivers and passengers will like them, but taller drivers might find them getting in the way.

Driving position

6.5
Both the seat and steering wheel have a wide range of adjustment, but the positioning of both puts the driver in an awkward position. Raising the seat draws your legs closer to the wheel. Taller drivers won't notice, but shorter drivers will struggle to balance visibility with ergonomics.

Roominess

8.0
Front headroom, shoulder room, and legroom are plentiful; the cabin suits taller drivers well. The back seat of the crew-cab Sierra is absolutely massive and has significant legroom. Three full-size adults can easily fit shoulder to shoulder back there.

Visibility

7.0
Forward visibility is restricted by a tall and broad hood. The windshield pillars are thick, making it hard to see where the corners are. Side visibility is acceptable, and the side mirrors are large. At slow speeds, the HD surround-vision camera system is effective and offers multiple views.

Quality

6.5
The interior is well-built and sturdy. The leather seat material is firm, while the soft-touch areas feel thinner but acceptable. There is still a lot of hard plastic in the interior, and we question the use of fake wood trim on the door and center console.

Utility

8.0
The GMC's bed is quite useful and convenient. It's big, with plenty of tie-downs. On top of that, it has useful bed steps and an exclusive MultiPro tailgate. The tow and payload ratings aren't sky-high, but that's not a major concern. The back half of the large crew cab has lots of room for cargo, and it is easy to fit just about any child safety seat.

Small-item storage

8.0
There's a place for everything inside the Sierra. There's a large and deep center console, big door pockets, two gloveboxes, and a small pocket on each side of the center console. Plus, the outer rear seatbacks open up to hold more of your stuff.

Cargo space

8.0
Inside, the 60/40-split rear bench folds up with no fuss. The floor isn't flat, but the area under the seats is partitioned so your stuff doesn't go flying around. It's not the biggest backseat area of the bunch, but it's more than satisfactory.

Child safety seat accommodation

8.5
There are enough LATCH points to put child seats in any of the three rear seat positions, and the corresponding top tethers are obvious straps that make it unnecessary to tip the rear seatback forward for access. The rear of the crew cab is quite large, so even the bulkiest of rear-facing seats will fit without trouble.

Towing

8.0
The Denali comes standard with a brake controller, trailer camera angles that help you get hitched, and memory settings for various trailer configurations. An available smartphone app expedites your vehicle-to-trailer connection.

Hauling

8.5
The GMC pickup has a very broad bed with 12 fixed tie-downs. The SLE, Denali and AT4 come standard with the useful MultiPro tailgate. Because of it, however, you'll have to get into the habit of removing the tow ball when you're not towing. Both ends of the rear bumper have prominent steps, and the Denali's power running boards have a kick-switch that swings them back to become a front corner bed step.

Technology

7.5
Even if the screen is a little small, the infotainment system and driver aids work well and are easy to use. The head-up display can show speed limit info through a handy bar graph. Otherwise, the story is about incremental improvement with this generation truck.

Smartphone integration

8.0
Apple CarPlay and Android Auto come standard. Our smartphones connected to Bluetooth and indexed our music quickly. There are USB ports on the dash, in the center console and in the rear seat area. The charging pad is in a convenient location and can hold large phones.

Driver aids

6.5
Our truck had automatic emergency braking, lane keeping assist, front and rear parking sensors, and blind-spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert. All but the lane keep system worked satisfactorily, so we kept it off. Adaptive cruise control is conspicuously unavailable.

Voice control

7.5
The merely competent voice recognition system understands basic commands such as "Play artist Bob Dylan" but is less able to interpret natural language. Connect your smartphone and you can use Siri and Google voice; those systems work better, particularly if you're using Apple CarPlay or Android Auto.

Consumer reviews

Read what other owners think about the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500.

5 star reviews: 24%
4 star reviews: 18%
3 star reviews: 13%
2 star reviews: 16%
1 star reviews: 29%
Average user rating: 2.9 stars based on 45 total reviews

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    2019 GMC Sierra 1500 video

    2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Denali | First Drive

    2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Denali | First Drive

    [UPBEAT MUSIC] DAN EDMUNDS: We're here in Newfoundland, and this is the GMC Sierra 1500 Denali. This is the first chance anyone's had to drive this all new truck, and we're going to find out if you should buy this instead of a Chevrolet Silverado. This is GMC's new MultiPro Tailgate, and it's configurable in six positions. Let's go through them. The bottom button here opens a tailgate like a normal tailgate. But from here you can open this load stop, and it'll keep items from sliding out. And if this was a 6 and 1/2 foot bed, there would be enough room here for a 4' by 8' sheet of plywood. You can also touch the top button, and now it opens so you can get in closer to load like a cooler or something that's heavy. And from here, you fold the stop down, and it becomes a step. And you just hop right in. And it's wide enough that you could do that while you're pushing a motorcycle up a ramp, too. Close this. Start back here. Open this, and now you have a different kind of load stop for items that you might want to have angling in. And if you fold this down, now you've got a work surface. So, yeah. That's the MultiPro Tailgate. It's pretty nice, got to admit. I want that. We've seen this corner bed step before, but this year, it's bigger and more compatible with heavy work boots. But that's not the only trick. Kick the running board, and it comes out and puts itself in a position where you can get into the bed really easily. Kick it again, and it returns. This Sierra Denali I'm driving has the 6.2 liter V8 engine, which makes 420 horsepower and 460 pounds feet of torque. That is quite a bit. I'm not able to use much of it here, because the speeds on the island are pretty slow, and we're not towing anything, so it's pretty much just loping along in a really high gear. And there are a lot of gears in this transmission, because the 6.2 is paired with a 10 speed automatic. If you get the 5.3, which is the base engine in this truck, the 8 speed comes with that. If you get something below a Denali, then you get into the 2.7 liter turbo. In the future, they'll be a 3 liter turbo diesel that will also come with this 10 speed. It's got adaptive damping, which means there's electronically controlled shock absorbers that have a couple of modes. It does some adjustment on the fly while we're driving, but I can also set it to sport mode or comfort mode. I think they call it touring instead. The thing is, it's not proving to be terribly comfortable here. Probably because this has the optional 22 inch wheel and tire package, which doesn't have much sidewall. You know, the jury's out on that until we get it home, but right now it's a little bit clompy and a little bit shaky once in a while. Definitely quivers after you hit certain bumps. But selecting sport mode doesn't just change the adaptive dampers, it also adjusts the weight of the power steering. Right now in touring, it's a little bit light. I go to sport mode by flicking that, and it firms up just a little bit. Not a huge difference, but there is a difference there. So if you buy one of these trucks with a standard 3.23 gearing, you have a tow ring that's under 10,000 pounds. If you want to boost it up over 10,000 pounds, you need to option up the truck with the 3.42 gearing, which also gets you a little bit stiffer spring and heavy duty cooling. All that comes together if you pick the optional axle ratio. The GMC Sierra has a full range of models down to work truck and up to the Denali, but it definitely skews towards the higher end of the luxury part of the market. It competes with the most highly optioned versions of the F-150, the Ram 1500, and even the Chevy Silverado. But in its lower cost forms, they're still good work truck value to be had. At first glance, the interior of the GMC Sierra is pretty similar to that of the Chevrolet Silverado, but there are differences that make it a nicer place to be. The leather looks and feels more high end. There's some wood trim here, open pore wood trim. And the knobs have this texturing that makes them look more attractive and a little bit easier to use. And then there's the gauge package. There's a configurable display that has a lot more power than what you'll see in a Silverado. Plus, there's a heads-up display that projects information up onto the windshield, so you don't have to take your eyes off the road. And here is a rear view camera mirror, which displays an image from a camera up by the third brake light above the bed. It's really quite clear, and you can zoom in and change the brightness. I really like this. I mean, we have one of these on our Bolt, but it's mounted lower, the camera isn't as good, and it kind of makes me queasy to use it. But this one-- this one is really nice. The basic design of the dash itself, to me, isn't that interesting. It looks pretty similar to the last generation. It's kind of vertical and monolithic. They've somehow managed to make the screen look smaller than it is. It kind of gets lost in the mass of this center stack. The knobs are pretty easy to understand, but they also aren't that interesting. There's a lot of space that isn't being used here. And then, this power outlet, I've attached things to the window on the Silverado and the cord goes right across this to get to this power outlet, so not a fan of that. Just the one USB here. USB-C as well. There is another USB inside the center console, so that's good. And this is a 120 volt outlet that you turn on and off here. There's another one in the bed that this switch also controls. Considering this has a column shifter and not a pistol grip shifter like the F-150, this console area is still kind of small. I mean, especially when you look at the new Ram 1500. They could've done more with the space it seems to me. This is a wireless charge pad though, but there's just not very much bin space. The GMC Sierra's interior is quite a bit more user friendly and more feature packed than the Silverado, but it's still based on a design that isn't terribly interesting. [MUSIC PLAYING] I'm pretty comfortable. I have to admit. There's a ton of leg room back here. They added three inches compared to last year. Just like the Silverado, but this is adjusted for me. I'm six foot two. I got tons of room back here. Lots of toe space. It's pretty easy to kick back. I'd like the seat back angled where you reclined a little bit more, but it's really not that bad. GM, Ford, RAM, they all have tons of leg room this year. That wasn't the case before, but now you can pick between the three, wouldn't really matter. This doesn't recline or have any of those extra features that the Ram has, but it's pretty comfortable. It does have tri-level seat heaters back here, which is nice. There's a USB and a USB-C port, just one of each. And they're power only, so you're not going to serve any music up to the front end from here. There is a 12 volt power outlet. And then of course you have a fold down center console. And they've got these clever little compartments here, one on each side. There's one behind me. I'm not going to open that one right now, but you get the idea. As with all pickup trucks like this, the seats in the back fold up. These are split 60-40. So I can fold up the other side here. You can see the floor is pretty wide. It's not as wide as some of the others, because of this little wall here. And the transmission hump is just tiny, but it's there. But still, it's a good amount of space with both of these seat backs flipped up. So the GMC Sierra Denali 4 by 4 Crew Cab, which is what this is, starts for about $58,000. This particular one with the options it has stickers for over $67,000. And it's got two main options that get it to that price. One is the 6.2 liter V8 which costs $2495 right off the top. And I think a lot of people are going to want that, because it's pretty darn good. But you don't have to get that engine. You can stick with the standard 5.3 V8 and the 8 speed if you want Denali. The other option that this truck has is the Denali Ultimate Package, which is just over $5,700. And it includes the rear view camera mirror, heads-up display. It also includes this trick camera system that has multiple cameras all around the truck. And then there's the forward collision warning. The lane keeping assist, blind spot monitoring, all of that stuff. The one thing it doesn't have, which is kind of an odd omission, is adaptive cruise control. The Denali 4 by 4 with the 6.2 liter V8 is rated at 17 MPG combined. That's 15 in the city and 20 on the highway. The interesting point is the 5.3 leader V8 is also rated at 17 combined but it's 15 in the city and 21 in the highway, so you're not really giving up that much if you get the 6.2 V8, except the $2495 it costs to buy it. The standard gas tank in this truck is 24 gallons, but you can opt for a larger one, which I would recommend if you're going to do any sort of towing for any length of time. The Denali comes with an 8 inch touchscreen that has Apple Car Play and Android Auto support. It also has built-in nav, which is great when you travel off the grid in places where you don't have any cell phone coverage. Like everything else these days, the Sierra has steering wheel controls that operate the stereo. They're on the back where you can't see them. But they're right here under your fingertips, which is nice. They don't clutter up the front of it. That leaves room for the menu controls, cruise control, a couple of other switches for like a heated steering wheel, which is nice. Little bit weird action here. One of them's a roller in the up-down direction, and then it's a rocker on the left-right, but imagine you'd get used to it. It still would be nice if they were the same. Yeah. It's really clean looking, and everything's right here. You really don't have to move your hands around very much to operate any of it. One of the things I do like about this interior-- I mean, the materials in general are upgraded really nicely, but there's not a lot of overly shiny chrome. I mean, this is kind of a hand rub finish that they've got here for this metal. It's not as shiny as some real plasticky looking chrome can be. And so there just isn't a lot of stuff that can reflect light back in the driver's eyes. And I really appreciate that. [ROCK MUSIC] My favorite truck is still the Ram 1500, but this has a lot of things going for it. It's got the 6.2 V8 10 speed transmission. Works great. But I really like this tailgate most of all. For my money, I take the GMC Sierra over the Chevrolet Silverado any day. SPEAKER 2: For more information, go to Edmunds. And for more videos like this, click subscribe.

    Edmunds journeys to St. John's, Newfoundland, and the far eastern edge of the North American continent to get a first taste of the all-new 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Denali pickup truck. Watch as Director of Vehicle Testing Dan Edmunds climbs behind the wheel of this fully redesigned full-size truck and gets familiar with its revised 6.2-liter V8 powertrain and its enlarged crew cab. You'll also see what he thinks about GMC's new MultiPro six-way tailgate.

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    Features & Specs

    2dr Regular Cab LB features & specs
    2dr Regular Cab LB
    4.3L 6cyl 6A
    MSRP$29,600
    MPG 16 city / 21 hwy
    SeatingSeats 3
    Transmission6-speed shiftable automatic
    Horsepower285 hp @ 5300 rpm
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    2dr Regular Cab 4WD LB features & specs
    2dr Regular Cab 4WD LB
    4.3L 6cyl 6A
    MSRP$34,200
    MPG 15 city / 20 hwy
    SeatingSeats 3
    Transmission6-speed shiftable automatic
    Horsepower285 hp @ 5300 rpm
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    See all 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab features & specs

    Safety

    Our experts’ favorite Sierra 1500 safety features:

    Forward Collision Alert
    Sounds an alert and flashes a light when the system detects a possible front crash.
    Lane Keep Assist
    Detects when the vehicle is drifting from its lane and gently steers it back toward the center.
    Low-Speed Forward Automatic Braking
    Automatically applies the brakes when the system detects an impending frontal crash at low speeds.

    NHTSA Overall Rating 4 out of 5 stars

    The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration offers independent analysis.

    Frontal Barrier Crash RatingRating
    Overall4 / 5
    Driver5 / 5
    Passenger4 / 5
    Side Crash RatingRating
    Overall5 / 5
    Side Barrier RatingRating
    Overall5 / 5
    Driver5 / 5
    PassengerNot Rated
    Combined Side Barrier & Pole RatingsRating
    Front Seat5 / 5
    Back SeatNot Rated
    RolloverRating
    Rollover4 / 5
    Dynamic Test ResultNo Tip
    Risk Of RolloverNot Rated

    GMC Sierra 1500 vs. the competition

    GMC Sierra 1500 vs. Ford F-150

    Few rivalries are as deep as Sierra/Silverado versus F-150. The Sierra, despite its redesign, isn't appreciably different from its predecessor in execution. The F-150 has stronger entry-level powertrains and a more modern-feeling cabin, though real-world fuel economy of its twin-turbo V6 engines doesn't meet expectations.

    Compare GMC Sierra 1500 & Ford F-150 features

    GMC Sierra 1500 vs. Ram 1500

    The Ram offers outstanding space, comfort and technology and is the only full-size pickup that is equipped with a coil-spring rear suspension. Like the Sierra, it is all-new as of 2019. But while the Sierra is a tame, incremental step forward, the Ram is a more convincingly bold step forward. It's the leader of the class.

    Compare GMC Sierra 1500 & Ram 1500 features

    GMC Sierra 1500 vs. Toyota Tundra

    The Tundra is simply outclassed by the Sierra and every other full-size pickup. It has not been redesigned in more than a decade, and it shows. While its V8 is potent, fuel economy lags the segment. The Sierra has more modern powertrains, better ride quality and a more contemporary cabin. That said, the Tundra has strong inherent towing capability in all models.

    Compare GMC Sierra 1500 & Toyota Tundra features

    Related Sierra 1500 Articles

    2019 GMC Sierra 1500 AT4 First Drive

    Luxury Truck Ventures Off the Beaten Path

    Cameron Rogers by Cameron Rogers , Reviews EditorJanuary 30th, 2019

    Although GMC has positioned itself as the upscale alternative to Chevrolet, it also realizes there's room to expand a little. Customer interest in off-road-capable SUVs and trucks has driven the creation of the new AT4 trim, which debuts in the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500.

    The Sierra 1500's AT4 trim adds four-wheel drive, a two-speed transfer case, a locking rear differential, all-terrain tires, a 2-inch suspension lift, Rancho shocks, skid plates, hill descent control, terrain-selectable traction settings, red tow hooks, and unique styling cues. I attended a GMC drive event in San Diego to find out if the Sierra AT4 successfully pulled off the unlikely pairing of luxurious comfort and off-road performance.

    Pre-Trail

    Step inside the AT4 and you'll find a cabin design and feature set that have more in common with the pricier Denali than the mid-tier SLT. Metallic-looking trim and brown seat inserts help break up the monochromatic palette and give the AT4 some visual flair. Many of the Denali's options can also be added to the AT4 for a more premium feel.

    For example, my crew-cab, short-bed test truck was equipped with the Premium package, which added a Bose audio system, navigation and a few driver assistance systems. It also had the Technology package, which contains the unassumingly named HD Surround Vision. We've seen 360-degree camera displays in cars before, but its multitude of viewable angles makes it uniquely suitable for the AT4. More on this later.

    I left my posh digs in San Diego's Gaslamp Quarter with the nav programmed to take me and my co-driver to Otay Mountain Truck Trail, roughly 30 miles away. I was impressed by the Sierra's optional 6.2-liter V8. At low speeds, the 10-speed transmission upshifts conservatively to save fuel, but the ample amount of available power means the engine never feels bogged down at low rpm.

    Nor does it ever feel lacking in thrust, especially when you put your foot down and unleash all 420 horsepower and 460 pound-feet of torque. Acceleration is quick, and with the available cat-back performance exhaust, the engine sounds appropriately snarly. Our test truck sported 18-inch wheels (20-inch wheels are available) and Goodyear Wrangler DuraTrac all-terrain tires (a $295 option), which proved pretty comfortable on our way to the trail.

    Off the Beaten Path

    The AT4 was just impressive off-road as it was on the highway. The Otay Mountain Truck Trail is by no means a hardcore rock-climbing experience, but it still proves challenging enough that you have to pay close attention. The trail is filled with hundreds of bumps, ruts and dips, all of which the AT4 dispatched without a problem. I was equally surprised by the total lack of panel squeaks and rattles anywhere in the cabin.

    After our trail drive, we were given an opportunity to test the Sierra's hill-climbing abilities. The HD Surround Vision feature comes in handy here. Its top-down perspective helps you thread between obstacles while its front-view camera allows you to see what's on the ground when the windshield is pointed toward the sky. This way, you'll always be able to scan ahead while cresting a hill.

    Pricing and Release Date

    The 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 AT4 is on sale now with a starting price of $52,295 (destination and handling included) for a double cab with a standard box. For that, you get the 5.3-liter V8, 4WD and the long list of performance upgrades over the SLT model. At $66,140, my tester was loaded with most of the major packages, including options such as the Driver Alert II package and a few other assorted goodies. It's a fairly expensive truck, but it costs a bit less than the range-topping Denali while still including the majority of its features.

    The AT4 is also different from the mechanically similar Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Trail Boss. Chevy's pickup isn't quite as nice inside, and it isn't available with the 6.2-liter V8, trick camera system or GMC's MultiPro tailgate.

    The GMC Sierra 1500 AT4 is worth checking out if you want a classy truck that can tackle trails with ease. And if you're looking at other GMC vehicles, don't worry — the redesigned 2020 GMC 2500HD and 3500HD pickups and refreshed 2020 GMC Acadia will also be available in AT4 variants.

    2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Pickup First Drive

    Can the New Sierra Shake Off the Silverado Comparisons?

    Dan Edmunds by Dan Edmunds , Director, Vehicle TestingAugust 27th, 2018

    Walking up to the 2019 GMC Sierra Denali 1500, it's hard not to muse about GMC's very identity. On the one hand, its historical roots as the General Motors Truck Co. give it a distinct commercial truck bent. Many people know it as "GMC Truck," a dedicated truck-only brand that's never sold cars.

    But over time, the brand has skewed toward the premium end of the market in order to distinguish GMC pickups from the mechanically identical trucks sold at Chevrolet dealers. This strategy led to the development of the wildly popular Denali trim level, which is practically a brand unto itself.

    All the while, there has been a lingering sense that it's all just a surface veneer, a case of GMC-versus-Chevy "badge engineering." GMC has always bristled at that notion. The all-new 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 pickup is designed to chart a new course, with greater differentiation from the Silverado 1500 in terms of styling, feature content, and even variations in powertrain availability.

    Same Frames, Different Bodywork

    Of course, significant mechanical commonalities are inevitable. Here the basic cab dimensions are shared, with the 2019 GMC Sierra crew cab enjoying the same 3-inch increase in rear legroom as the Silverado. The stronger frame and all the benefits that come with it are here in force.

    But the bodywork is quite different. This has been the case for a number of years, but now the differences go deeper. Changes made to the underlying support structures gave GMC and Chevrolet designers greater freedom to go their separate ways, enabling more divergence in headlight size, shape and placement.

    Visibility over the Sierra's hood is notably better because its headlights are a bit lower and set farther back, but the bigger point is the two trucks now give off distinctly different vibes. The GMC Sierra sports a handsome and more traditional front end that we find far less polarizing than that of the Silverado. It's now possible to love the Sierra and hate the Silverado — or vice versa — while it's far less likely that a prospective buyer won't have a clear favorite.

    A Look Inside

    Inside, however, the differences are subtle. Indeed, the contours of the dash and the location of its various controls are virtually the same between the trucks. Both interiors frankly look a generation old right out of the gate, though we suppose that owners trading in old for new might welcome the familiarity.

    The Sierra Denali does have a little more going for it, though. The knobs have a different look and a pleasing texture, and the heated and ventilated leather seats are attractive and supportive. Additionally, the Sierra's instrument panel has a much larger and more comprehensive data display between the tach and the speedometer, and you can get a massive 3-by-7-inch head-up display as part of the Denali Ultimate package.

    But the everyday negatives are many, ranging from a too-small center console to a stodgy column shifter. The screen-printed effects on our truck's touchscreen surround looked pretty unconvincing, too. A midlevel Ram Laramie with a few options serves up a more interesting and attractive interior laden with more thoughtful features, even compared to the Sierra 1500 Denali.

    Powertrain Improvements

    GMC's Sierra 1500 powertrain lineup consists of five offerings as of this writing, with a diesel engine on the way. Not surprisingly, it's the same roster that Chevrolet offers. The base model gets the legacy 4.3-liter V6 and 5.3-liter V8 engines bolted to last year's six-speed transmission, while the next two rungs up get the 2.7-liter turbocharged four-cylinder and eight-speed automatic combination we sampled earlier this year.

    There's also a second 5.3-liter engine in the lineup, as well as the 6.2-liter V8 engine in the Denali we drove for this review. Both have a new Dynamic Fuel Management system (DFM) that can shut off any of the eight cylinders in 17 different skip-fire patterns. But their outputs are unchanged: 355 horsepower and 383 pound-feet of torque for the DFM 5.3-liter V8 and 420 hp and 460 lb-ft for the DFM 6.2-liter V8. The 5.3-liter V8 is mated to an eight-speed automatic we've seen before, while the larger 6.2-liter V8 is bolted to a new 10-speed automatic.

    The DFM 5.3-liter combination is standard in the top three trim levels: the SLT, the new AT4 off-road model, and the Denali. You can get the 6.2-liter as an option in any of them, but only if you buy a four-wheel-drive model. There's no such thing as a two-wheel-drive Sierra with the 6.2-liter V8 this year.

    New AT4 Model

    Did you catch that? You can get the 6.2-liter V8 in the AT4 as an option. This is huge, because the AT4 is the GMC Sierra version of the Chevrolet Trail Boss, and the Trail Boss definitely does not offer the 6.2-liter V8 as an option. Score one for GMC. A big one.

    Like the Trail Boss, the Sierra AT4 rides on a factory-developed 2-inch suspension lift and off-road-tuned Rancho monotube shocks. It rolls on the same knobby 18-inch Goodyear Wrangler DuraTrac tires that have a useful bit of sidewall, but they come mounted on different GMC-designed wheels that look sharp. There's also a locking rear differential, hill descent control and extra skid plates.

    The GMC version's interior is more nicely dressed, with standard leather seating and a front console — items that are two rungs up the option ladder in the LT Trail Boss. The AT4 looks less like a DIY aftermarket job on the outside with its cohesive front-end styling and body-color grille.

    A Magic Tailgate

    The GMC Sierra scores well on the pickup-box front, with generous internal dimensions and 12 standard tie-downs. This year the corner steps built into the ends of its rear bumper have been enlarged to accommodate boots. A spray-in bedliner is standard on the SLT, AT4 and Denali, with an optional carbon-fiber box to come later. The Denali can be equipped with GMC's clever MultiPro retractable side steps that can pivot forward to offer bed access at the tap of a foot.

    And then there's the new MultiPro six-position tailgate. Standard on the SLT, AT4 and Denali, the MultiPro tailgate has a second hinge in the middle — a tailgate within a tailgate, if you will — and a flip-up panel. The flip-up panel is a load stop that keeps stuff from sliding out in two of the positions, and it becomes a nearly full-width stairstep when deployed with both tailgates down. We could not stop playing with it. This genius bit of truck origami alone will sell some Sierras.

    Towing Options

    The GMC Sierra's standard tow rating hovers in the 9,500-pound range with standard 3.23 gearing and either of the DFM V8 engines. The Max Trailering package (3.42 gears, stiffer rear suspension, extra cooling, more alternator capacity) raises that to about 11,500 pounds for the 5.3-liter V8, and as much as 12,200 pounds for the 6.2-liter V8 4x4.

    GMC's ProGrade Trailering System comes standard on the SLT, AT4 and Denali, and that includes an enhanced backup camera to ease hookups and an in-vehicle suite of trailer diagnostics and checklists. Also available is an optional tire pressure monitoring system that can monitor the trailer's tires. An enhanced trailer camera option not only adds two cameras that look down the length of the trailer from the truck's mirrors, but the ability to mount a compatible GMC accessory camera to the back of the trailer and display its image in the cab.

    Both of these are welcome offerings, but the remote trailer camera system's image — crystal-clear though it may be — can only be viewed for a handful of seconds before it winks out. What's more, that fleeting image appears on the 8-inch touchscreen, not the rear camera mirror display. The latter is a separate video rearview mirror system that can display a continuous image of what's behind the truck using a camera on the back of the cab. Also absent is a blind-spot monitoring system that can account for the length of the trailer.

    The Driving Experience

    There's no doubt that the 6.2-liter V8 can do the business. It's a stout motor, and the 10-speed transmission felt flawless on our drive. This power team gets with the program when pushed, but it thankfully lacks the sort of overeager throttle jumpiness that can annoy when your aim is to take it easy. For its part, the Dynamic Fuel Management system goes about its business without letting on.

    We're less convinced by the adaptive ride control suspension, a Denali exclusive. Our truck's ride was sometimes jittery and uneven, even in the less aggressive Touring mode. The weather-beaten local roads may have had something to do with it, but we're not ready to assign all blame to the road department. The 22-inch wheels probably weren't helping either. Additional driving on familiar pavement around Edmunds HQ will reveal more.

    We didn't drive the Denali 6.2 long enough to get a good sense of its fuel economy over varied terrain, but a look at the EPA fuel economy ratings tells a disappointing story. You'd think the needle would have moved significantly after all the talk about weight-reduction efforts, the fancy DFM system and the 10-speed gearbox's extra cogs. But the EPA rating of our 6.2-liter 4x4 is no different than it was for the year preceding those changes. It was 17 mpg combined (15 city/20 highway) last year, and so it is today. What happened? The 5.3-liter DFM V8 two-wheel-drive truck manages a single-mpg increase, but that's as good as it gets.

    The Bottom Line

    Our 2019 GMC Sierra Denali 1500 crew-cab 4x4 test truck carried a base price of $58,000, and the 6.2-liter V8 engine added on another $2,495. The only other option was the $5,710 Denali Ultimate package. That got us a surround-view camera, the rear camera mirror display, a head-up display, a power sunroof, 22-inch wheels, and the pivoting GMC MultiPro power side steps. It also included safety gear such as automatic high beams, low-speed automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, forward collision warning and lane keeping assist. Oddly, adaptive cruise control is not available. All told, our loaded truck cost $67,200 with destination charges included.

    We see a lot to like about the GMC Sierra compared to the Chevrolet Silverado, but neither one is a segment leader. Like the Silverado, the 2019 GMC Sierra is incrementally better than the truck it replaces. Current owners looking to trade in will probably be happy, and GMC may steal some sales from Chevy on the strength of its trick tailgate and maybe the 6.2-liter V8 availability in the AT4. But from where we sit, it seems unlikely the 2019 GMC Sierra will earn a raft of new converts from outside. No new high bars have been set here.

    2019 GMC Sierra 1500 First Look

    GMC's Luxury Pickup Truck Gets a Full Redesign

    Travis Langness by Travis Langness , Reviews EditorMarch 1st, 2018

    The 2019 GMC Sierra is completely redesigned. Following in the footsteps of its sibling, the redesigned Chevrolet Silverado, the Sierra features a new look, a roomier interior, and several new technology and utility-related features.

    On the outside, the Sierra 1500 is now longer, wider and taller. Overall, the truck looks taller and more commanding than before. The wheels are now farther apart from front to back, increasing the Sierra's wheelbase in both length and width and decreasing front overhang. GMC is using those exterior-dimension increases to provide more room in the Sierra's rear seat. Legroom in the back of the crew-cab model grows by nearly 3 inches, for instance, which should mean plenty of room for adults to sit in back. On the top-level Denali trim level, you'll be able to get the new Sierra with premium leather upholstery and classy-looking open-pore wood trim.

    Despite all this extra square footage, the new Sierra is lighter than the current model by as much as 360 pounds. A big part of that weight loss comes from the incorporation of aluminum doors, an aluminum hood, and a unique tailgate that also incorporates aluminum. The Sierra's cargo bed is still made from high-strength steel, but GMC says it's 50 percent stronger than the current truck's bed. A new cargo bed made out of carbon fiber will also be available later in the truck's model year; it's even stronger and lighter than the steel bed, according to GMC.

    Another new party piece is the truck's MultiPro tailgate. It has six possible configurations, including one position that uses it for seating, one that turns it into a step, and another that treats the tailgate as a work table. Depending on how the tailgate is configured, it can hold up to 375 pounds. The MultiPro tailgate will be standard on the SLT and Denali trim levels.

    On the inside, the 2019 Sierra gets quite a bit of new tech. You'll find a new color head-up display for the driver and an available surround-view camera system for tight parking scenarios. There's also a new rearview mirror that can be used in a conventional fashion or switched to display a live video feed from a rearview camera, giving you the ability to see what's behind you even if you're hauling a tall load in the bed.

    Part of the tech upgrade for this new truck is a new trailering system, named ProGrade, that incorporates maintenance reminders, a trailer light test, trailer tire-pressure monitors and temperature monitoring, and even features such as trailer theft detection. As expected, several safety features are also available on the 2019 Sierra, including blind-spot monitoring, forward collision warning with pedestrian detection, and low-speed automatic braking.

    If, at this point, you're wondering why we haven't mentioned engines, it's because GMC hasn't released much information about them yet. We know the previous 5.3-liter V8 will return as the base engine, and the Sierra's 6.2-liter V8 will be back as an optional engine. A 3.0-liter turbocharged six-cylinder diesel will also arrive in the lineup later in the year. All are pretty much the same as the powerplants announced for the Silverado as well. Both the 6.2-liter and the 3.0-liter diesel engine will be paired with GMC's 10-speed automatic transmission.

    The 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 will go on sale in fall of 2018. The Sierra will initially debut in the SLT and Denali trim levels, which are the two highest trim levels currently available. For all your shopping needs and more details on the 2019 Sierra, stay tuned here on Edmunds.

    FAQ

    Is the GMC Sierra 1500 a good car?
    The Edmunds experts tested the 2019 Sierra 1500 both on the road and at the track, giving it a 7.3 out of 10. You probably care about GMC Sierra 1500 fuel economy, so it's important to know that the Sierra 1500 gets an EPA-estimated 17 mpg. And then there's safety and reliability. Edmunds has all the latest NHTSA and IIHS crash-test scores, plus industry-leading expert and consumer reviews to help you understand what it's like to own and maintain a GMC Sierra 1500. Learn more
    What's new in the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500?

    According to Edmunds’ car experts, here’s what’s new for the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500:

    • The Sierra is fully redesigned for 2019
    • Part of the fourth Sierra generation introduced for 2019
    Learn more
    Is the GMC Sierra 1500 reliable?
    To determine whether the GMC Sierra 1500 is reliable, read Edmunds' authentic consumer reviews, which come from real owners and reveal what it's like to live with the Sierra 1500. Look for specific complaints that keep popping up in the reviews, and be sure to compare the Sierra 1500's average consumer rating to that of competing vehicles. Learn more
    Is the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 a good car?
    There's a lot to consider if you're wondering whether the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 is a good car. Edmunds' expert testing team reviewed the 2019 Sierra 1500 and gave it a 7.3 out of 10. Safety scores, fuel economy, cargo capacity and feature availability should all be factors in determining whether the 2019 Sierra 1500 is a good car for you. Learn more
    How much should I pay for a 2019 GMC Sierra 1500?

    The least-expensive 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 is the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 2dr Regular Cab LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A). Including destination charge, it arrives with a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of about $29,600.

    Other versions include:

    • 2dr Regular Cab LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $29,600
    • 2dr Regular Cab 4WD LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A) which starts at $34,200
    Learn more
    What are the different models of GMC Sierra 1500?
    If you're interested in the GMC Sierra 1500, the next question is, which Sierra 1500 model is right for you? Sierra 1500 variants include 2dr Regular Cab LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A), and 2dr Regular Cab 4WD LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A). For a full list of Sierra 1500 models, check out Edmunds’ Features & Specs page. Learn more

    More about the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500

    2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab Overview

    The 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab is offered in the following styles: 2dr Regular Cab LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A), and 2dr Regular Cab 4WD LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A).

    What do people think of the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab?

    Consumer ratings and reviews are also available for the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab and all its trim types. Overall, Edmunds users rate the 2019 Sierra 1500 Regular Cab 2.9 on a scale of 1 to 5 stars. Edmunds consumer reviews allow users to sift through aggregated consumer reviews to understand what other drivers are saying about any vehicle in our database. Detailed rating breakdowns (including performance, comfort, value, interior, exterior design, build quality, and reliability) are available as well to provide shoppers with a comprehensive understanding of why customers like the 2019 Sierra 1500 Regular Cab.

    Edmunds Expert Reviews

    Edmunds experts have compiled a robust series of ratings and reviews for the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab and all model years in our database. Our rich analysis includes expert reviews and recommendations for the 2019 Sierra 1500 Regular Cab featuring deep dives into trim levels including Base, etc. with careful analysis around pricing, features, performance, mpg, safety, interior, and driving and performance. Edmunds also offers expert ratings, road test and performance data, long-term road tests, first-drive reviews, video reviews and more.

    Read our full review of the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab here.

    Our Review Process

    This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

    We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.

    What's a good price for a New 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab?

    2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab 2dr Regular Cab LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A)

    The 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab 2dr Regular Cab LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A) can be purchased for less than the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (aka MSRP) of $31,590. The average price paid for a new 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab 2dr Regular Cab LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A) is trending $5,709 below the manufacturer’s MSRP.

    Edmunds members save an average of $5,709 by getting upfront special offers. The estimated special offer price in your area is $25,881.

    The average savings for the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab 2dr Regular Cab LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A) is 18.1% below the MSRP.

    Available Inventory:

    We are showing 1 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab 2dr Regular Cab LB (4.3L 6cyl 6A) vehicle(s) available in the Ashburn area.

    Shop with Edmunds for perks and special offers on new cars, trucks, and SUVs near Ashburn, VA. Doing so could save you hundreds or thousands of dollars. Edmunds also provides consumer-driven dealership sales and service reviews to help you make informed decisions about what cars to buy and where to buy them.

    Which 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cabs are available in my area?

    2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab Listings and Inventory

    There are currently 6 new 2019 [object Object] Sierra 1500 Regular Cabs listed for sale in your area, with list prices as low as $31,590 and mileage as low as 0 miles. Simply research the type of used car you're interested in and then select a car from our massive database to find cheap used cars for sale near you. Once you have identified a vehicle you're interested in, check the AutoCheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab. Then select Edmunds special offers, perks, deals, and incentives to contact the dealer of your choice and save up to $3,591 on a new, used or CPO 2019 [object Object] Sierra 1500 Regular Cab available from a dealership near you.

    Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap new, used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2019 [object Object] Sierra 1500 Regular Cab for sale near you.

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    Find a new GMC Sierra 1500 for sale - 8 great deals out of 11 listings starting at $13,964.

    Find a new GMC for sale - 6 great deals out of 9 listings starting at $13,761.

    Why trust Edmunds?

    Edmunds has deep data on over 6 million new, used, and certified pre-owned vehicles, including all models of the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab and all available trim types: Base, Base. Rich, trim-level features & specs and options data tracked for the 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab include (but are not limited to): MSRP, available incentives and deals, average price paid, warranty information (basic, drivetrain, and maintenance), features (interior and exterior color, upholstery, bluetooth, navigation, cruise control, parking assistance, lane sensing, keyless ignition, satellite radio, folding rears seats,run flat tires, wheel type, tire size, sunroof, etc.), vehicle specifications (engine cylinder count, drivetrain, engine power, torque, engine displacement, transmission), fuel economy and MPG (city, highway, and combined, fuel capacity, range), vehicle dimensions (interior cabin space, vehicle length and width, seating capacity, cargo space). Edmunds also provides tools to allow shopper to compare vehicles to similar models of their choosing by warranty, interior features, exterior features, specifications, vehicle dimensions, consumer rating, edmunds expert review, safety rating, and color.

    Should I lease or buy a 2019 GMC Sierra 1500 Regular Cab?

    Is it better to lease or buy a car? Ask most people and they'll probably tell you that car buying is the way to go. And from a financial perspective, it's true, provided you're willing to make higher monthly payments, pay off the loan in full and keep the car for a few years. Leasing, on the other hand, can be a less expensive option on a month-to-month basis. It's also good if you're someone who likes to drive a new car every three years or so.

    Check out GMC lease specials