Cargo Cover Arrived - 2013 Tesla Model S Long-Term Road Test
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2013 Tesla Model S Long-Term Road Test

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2013 Tesla Model S: Cargo Cover Arrived

May 24, 2013

2013 Tesla Model S

Six weeks after taking delivery of our 2013 Tesla Model S, the cargo cover arrived. It was disappointing that we had to wait so long for the arrival of the $250 optional cargo cover, which Tesla prefers to call a parcel shelf. But that was nothing compared to how long we waited for the charger to show up.

2013 Tesla Model S

2013 Tesla Model S

Mike Schmidt, Vehicle Testing Manager @ 3,722 miles


Comments

  • agentorange agentorange Posts:

    Wait, are you telling us that a cargo cover is not standard? This is the sort of cheapskate crap pulled by the big three when they tried to build hatchbacks back in the late 70s and early 80s. I cannot recall a hatchback sold in UK during that period that did not come with a cargo cover when new. It's a basic requirement, period.

  • fordson1 fordson1 Posts:

    Wait - 3,722 miles? I thought this was the EV that would bring the paradigm shift - with real-car performance, long range and fast charge times, this would be a whole new ball game. So this car joined the fleet on 2/21 and has 3,722 miles on it, and the CX-5 joined on 2/28 and over a week ago had 7,227 miles. And this in SoCal, home of the Supercharger system and where every Trader Joe's and Starbucks has a charging station out front. I predicted soon after they got the Tesla that it would finish out the year with around 14k miles on it, rather than the standard LT fleet 20k, and it looks like that's about right. All the Edmunds staff has raved about this car, but when the sign-out sheet makes its rounds, it looks like they all decide maybe a car with an ICE would be a better move..."but only THIS time, y'know...I'll take it next week, honest." Sounds like I'm ragging on the car, but frankly it's kind of sad - should be some more outside-the-box thinking employed by staffers, maybe?

  • hybris hybris Posts:

    Fordson1 does have a point you guys made the choice to get the Tesla (IIRC you guys did buy it outright.) now you drive it. As they say you made your bed now lie in it.

  • mfennell mfennell Posts:

    Way to cherry pick. The CX-5 has been on at least 3 road trips totaling more than 3000 miles. As you've pointed out time after time after time (after time), it's a poor roadtrip car. They're driving the S 1200 miles a month. What would be OK with you?

  • fordson1 fordson1 Posts:

    I just picked the car that entered the fleet at around the same time as the S, but really any of the LT cars are gaining miles at a faster rate than the S, so I'm not too sure what you mean by "cherry picking," as I understand the term. What would be OK with me? Given the car's range and the availability of the Supercharger system and fast-charge-at-home capability that together were going to MAKE this a better road-tripper than any EV has been in the past, I would like them to take it and do some road trips in it, and talk about how that worked. The LT Nissan Leaf did 3,500 miles in six months, and this car looks like it is on pace to do 7,000 miles in six months - but are you happy with the "poor roadtrip car" label and willing to accept that the Tesla's highest and best use is merely to be a better Nissan Leaf?

  • duck87 duck87 Posts:

    Unfortunately, delivery took a while because their delivery van also has an electric powertrain and required stops at a couple of supercharger stations.

  • duck87 duck87 Posts:

    To be fair, Edmunds also did publish a blog post where one of their editors somehow managed to fail to plug a wattmeter into an outdoor receptacle. If this is the depth of their effort involved in running this car, do you really expect them to plan a trip out and get creative with putting on the mileage? Tesla Model S owners are typically the kind of people who plan their routes around charge stations and are constantly aware of their remaining range; this is a lot more work than gas-and-go cars and probably more than some of the editors want to deal with. There's also the possibility of the editors writing something unsavoury to the Tesla zealots and having a flood of negative comments in return. Who wants to deal with that crap?

  • fordson1 fordson1 Posts:

    "Tesla Model S owners are typically the kind of people who plan their routes around charge stations and are constantly aware of their remaining range; this is a lot more work than gas-and-go cars and probably more than some of the editors want to deal with." Ding, ding, ding...we have a winner.

  • mfennell mfennell Posts:

    FWIW, there are many posters on teslamotorsclub.com on track for >20k miles annually.

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