2010 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor Long Term Road Test


2010 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor: Now Appearing in Oregon

July 28, 2010

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This year's Oregon trip came up quickly, with little fanfare. That's partly because the usual ruminations over which vehicle to take became unnecessary when my wife and youngest daughter had to stay behind due to a last-minute schedule conflict. With just myself and eldest daughter Shelby making the trip, any vehicle was going to work.

And then the 2010 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor arrived at the office--the 6.2-liter version with 411 horsepower, no less--and the decision became easy. Shell and I would have a pair of comfy seats up front, with Sync and Sirius to keep us entertained, and our stuff could ride safely inside the cab behind us.

With just two of us, a single-day banzai run would be easier to pull off. In fact we're here already, sitting in Dad's driveway near the Pistol River/Carpenterville/Brookings tri-city area. Here's a little of what we saw along the way.

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We came upon this genius in WIllits, California, heading north on Highway 101. I don't know what's dumber: towing a trailer with a Smart or driving a Smart from Indiana to who-knows-where on a cross-country trip. Alone.

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Oregonians who buy Ford Raptors will be disappointed to learn that their coveted personalized license plate is already taken by a birdwatcher in a Toyota Land Cruiser. It would have been great to get this gal to pull over for a nifty side-by-side picture, but there was no graceful way to get it done. Besides, we were looking for gas at this point, and she kept on going when we stopped.

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Speaking of fuel, here are some early fuel consumption numbers. They're especially interesting because the Ford SVT Raptor is one of those trucks that does not have EPA mileage estimates on the window sticker. Buyers concerned about fuel economy have absolutely nothing to go on, and the standard F-150 rating is of no use because of the Raptor's 6.2-liter engine, the higher rear axle ratio, the wide and tall stance and the general Raptor-ness of the thing.

Why is the Raptor completely exempt from EPA fuel economy testing and labeling? Because its stated curb weight is greater than 6,000 pounds, that's why. Trucks with GVWRs north of 8,500 pounds are also exempt, but that heavy-duty trigger does not apply here.

Our average over 808 highway miles is 13.7 mpg, with a best tank that nudges up against 14 mpg. It's probably possible to do a little better with a kevlar-carbon composite foot instead of a leaden one, and a few more miles should help. We'll see on the way home.

Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing @ 1,726 miles

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Edmunds Insurance Estimator

The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2010 Ford F-150 in VA is:

$130 per month*
* Explanation
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