2009 Nissan GT-R Long-Term Road Test


2009 Nissan GT-R: Fully Automated? Not Completely. Not Yet.

August 14, 2009

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Aside from its frequent dealer visits, the usual criticism leveled at our 2009 Nissan GT-R is that it does too much for its driver, in effect isolating you from the driving experience. The car and its computers work the clutch(es), manage your launch and determine a target yaw rate as you steer into a turn.

So what's left for you to do? I went looking around our GT-R for stuff to do.

You can pull the old-school dipstick and check your own oil. Can't do that in our M3 or our S5.

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You can insert an old-school prop rod to the keep the hood up. Or, if you really want a challenge, hold the hood up yourself.

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You can open the trunk all by yourself. No electric assist here.

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You can turn on the HID headlights manually. In fact, at night, you have to because it's the law. Cool!

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Of course, you also choose when to brake, steer and jam on the throttle in the GT-R, which is why it's still called *driving* when you get behind the wheel. Apparently, and supposedly, such activities could become optional in other future Nissans.

Where would you draw the line? Is the Nissan GT-R's current state of automation OK by you, since most of its various "systems" are oriented around going faster? Or has Godzilla already gone too far?

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Edmunds Insurance Estimator

The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2009 Nissan GT-R in VA is:

$153 per month*
* Explanation
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