2016 Tesla Model X Long-Term Road Test - MPG

2016 Tesla Model X Long-Term Road Test

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests (1)
  • Comparison
  • Long-Term

2016 Tesla Model X: Monthly Update for October 2017

by Josh Sadlier, Senior Editor of Content Strategy

2016 Tesla Model X

Where Did We Drive It?
Our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X kept a low profile in October, racking up about 1,000 miles in total. Many of those miles came courtesy of Dan Frio, our man in Orange County, who had plenty of time to mull over the Model X's eccentricities while sitting in traffic.

We did log one of our best range efforts in a while —a 172-mile jaunt at the beginning of the month. It's worth noting, though, that even though the Model X's theoretical range is well over 200 miles, we haven't traveled that far on a single charge since setting our all-time record of 212.6 miles in April. The big Tesla gives you more range than a typical EV, for sure, but it's not quite the long-distance champ that early reports might have expected it to be.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Monthly Update for September 2017

by Will Kaufman, Associate Staff Writer

2016 Tesla Model X

Where Did We Drive It?
Following an eventful and entertaining month in August with Dan Edmunds' extensive round trip towing test to Lake Tahoe, California, our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X eased back into a more normal routine, hanging around town and switching hands between other Edmunds staffers.

This month, our Model X received another over-the-air software update that now displays supercharger availability and charging rates. These updates are still sort of mind-blowing when you think of it. It's like receiving miscellaneous new features for your car from Santa Musk whenever he feels like dropping by.

The update was even accompanied with an electronic card:

"Supercharging your Model X isn't always just about finding the nearest Supercharger. Sometimes it's about finding the one that will get you back on the road the quickest, even if it's a little farther away. Model X now displays the maximum power available for each location, so you can choose one that best fits your needs."

Thanks, Elon!

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Tow Test Recap

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing

2016 Tesla Model X

It doesn't take long to find yourself climbing a grade when you drive out of the Los Angeles basin. After all, the place is hemmed in by mountains. Just a few miles into the trip our 2016 Tesla Model X began a steady 5-mile ascent of the Sepulveda Pass, a 1,130-foot prelude of things to come that didn't even get us out of the sprawling L.A. area.

This modest 3 percent grade doesn't feel like much unless you're towing something, but that's exactly what we were doing. This was the start of a four-day towing adventure with a Happier Camper HC1 trailer. Our target lakeside campground lay almost exactly 500 miles ahead of us, a distance we figured would take two days to cover based on an earlier experience with range and recharging while towing on Tesla'a Supercharger network.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Tow Test Reboot With a Happier Camper Trailer

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing

2016 Tesla Model X

Unlike any other electric vehicles on the market, the 2016 Tesla Model X is able to tow a trailer. The maximum Model X tow rating is 5,000 pounds, but any Model X fitted with the optional 22-inch wheels, such as ours, is limited to 3,500 pounds. The bigger wheels come with ultra low-profile tires that aren't able to bear as much weight because it's the air volume inside a tire that carries the weight.

But we know from experience that these numbers don't tell the whole story. Towing on electric power is complicated by the realities of range and recharging, two critical factors that are ignored by the official tow-rating process. Last summer these issues made for such an unpleasant first experience that, after it was all over, I wrote, "I'm not sure I ever want to do it again."

For various practical reasons the trailer we'd borrowed from Off the Grid Rentals was a specialized adventure trailer intended for off-road towing behind a Jeep or Land Rover. We appreciated the trailer in its own right, but its combination of huge off-road tires, massive jutting fenders and exposed external equipment made us wonder if some unseen excess of aerodynamic drag and rolling resistance had been especially hard on the Tesla. It has been a nagging question.

So we're doing it again. But this time we're using an enclosed fiberglass camping trailer from Happier Camper. Just looking at it, the HC1 model is a much more obvious and compatible partner to the Model X. But will it make a difference? Will the Model X do better with a more conventional trailer in tow?

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Monthly Update for August 2017

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing

2016 Tesla Model X

Where Did We Drive It?
We drove our 2016 Tesla Model X 1,957 miles this month, including a long, 1,046-mile road trip up the eastern flank of California's Sierra Nevada mountains.

But no new records were set this month because that road trip was a four-day tow test with a small, single-axle Happier Camper trailer latched on behind. The remaining 911 miles amounted to local commuting miles and a trip to Disneyland, where the main guest parking garage has 100 spaces equipped with metered 240-volt ChargePoint stations.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Monthly Update for July 2017

by Rex Tokeshi-Torres, Vehicle Testing Technician

2016 Tesla Model X

Where Did We Drive It?
Our 2016 Tesla Model X was a reliable commuter vehicle this month. We can't say it was completely incident-free, however, since there was an issue that necessitated a soft reboot of the Tesla's display systems. This issue is not found in the manual, and it required some Googling and reading through the Tesla forum for the Model X. Thankfully, it was a fairly easy fix and it did not require any downtime at a local service center.

The Model X's departure from our fleet is imminent. However, it also served as a constant reminder that the new Model 3 is just around the corner. There were multiple occasions while sitting at a supercharger where conversation came up about whether we ordered a Model 3. Our very own Dan Edmunds went to the Tesla launch event for the Model 3 and says that the vehicle seems promising.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Monthly Update for April 2017

by Michael Massey, Vehicle Testing Assistant

2016 Tesla Model X

Where Did We Drive It?

Our 2016 Tesla Model X had a busy month despite not traveling very far.

April opened with the car at our local Tesla shop to remedy a list of nagging concerns, including one that caused us to drop everything and drive straight to the service center. With a clean bill of health it returned to commuter duty. Just as the month was closing we had an opportunity to display the Model X at two impromptu car shows, where the SUV showed it still has a wow factor.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Taking a Family of 5 to Yosemite in the Winter

by Brent Romans, Senior Automotive Editor on February 27, 2017

2016 Tesla Model X

With all the storms we've had this winter, I've been itching to head up to Yosemite National Park and check out the waterfalls. A weekend in late January looked promising, and at the time I also had our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X signed out. I figured it'd be interesting to see how Tesla's three-row crossover would handle a day trip with my family of five.

Well, it was certainly interesting, though part of that was due to under-preparation and overconfidence on my part.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Monthly Update for January 2017

by Brent Romans, Senior Automotive Editor

2016 Tesla Model X

Where Did We Drive It?
As has often been the case with our 2016 Tesla Model X, we used most of its electrons in January to get us from our SoCal homes to the Edmunds office and back. In fact, my co-worker Ed Hellwig almost ran out of electrons while commuting to the office one day, which you can read more about in his comment below. I'm sure that was fun for him.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Monthly Update for November 2016

by Ed Hellwig, Executive Editor

2016 Tesla Model X

Where Did We Drive It?
Much like last month, our Tesla Model X was confined to commuter duty for most of November. It wowed kids in school parking lots, carried plates of food on Thanksgiving, and otherwise played the part of a typical family vehicle. Unlike last month, however, it didn't spend any time cooling its heels at the service center. We did see that a recall was issued for certain Model X charge-plug adapters, but our particular parts were not affected.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Monthly Update for October 2016

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor

2016 Tesla Model X

Where Did We Drive It?
Following last month's Hydrogen Highway vs. Tesla Supercharger experiment, our long-term Model X has returned to its regular commuting duties. The big news for October was a service call to address 16(!) minor issues that had piled up. As fate would have it, yet another isolated issue arose after the service that may affect us on the few rainy days we get here.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Supercharger Shortcut on the Return Leg From Lake Tahoe

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on September 30, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

I step around the power cord that juts from the rear flank of our 2016 Tesla Model X, pop open the hatch and arrange my bags in the luggage well. After unplugging our Lake Tahoe hotel's complimentary Destination charger, I click a ballpoint and note the battery's full status and new range — 248 miles — in the Tesla's logbook. Jay stands nearby tossing his gear into the trunk of his Toyota Mirai, which I know has less than half a tank of hydrogen because I parked it last night.

We exit the hotel lot together and line up at a red light, waiting to turn left. The border runs down the middle of the street we're on. I briefly consider opening my door and stamping my foot across the dashed center line so part of me can be in Nevada, but then the left arrow turns green and I drive my entire self into the state instead.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Destination Charging is a Thing

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on September 19, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Cross-country travel in a car like our 2016 Tesla Model X is possible and practical because of the Supercharger network. And today's network is even stronger than it was two years ago, when we drove our 2013 Model S to New York and back in less than a week. As of today, the fansite supercharge.info says there are 296 active Supercharger stations spread across the USA, with 15 more under construction and 13 others that have received permits.

But Tesla's free charging network has another component. It's called Destination Charging, and it's not as well-known.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Full Charge Means No Regenerative Braking

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on July 20, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Heading into a long weekend, I decided to give our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X a full charge rather than the usual 90 percent. Once on the road, the regenerative braking system was clearly feeling the effects.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Power Loss When Parked

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on July 12, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Batteries will slowly deplete themselves without powering anything, this is a fact of life. Our 2016 Tesla Model X is no different. I spent five days with it and between the time I parked it at night until I dragged myself out of the apartment the next morning, I noted a slight decrease in range.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Road Trip to Big Sur

by Josh Sadlier, Senior Editor on July 8, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

When I signed out the 2016 Tesla Model X for the weekend and realized I had no plans, I did what any reasonable car nut would do.

Checked the Supercharger network and headed for Big Sur.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: My First Supercharger, and Autopilot Inconsistencies

by Cameron Rogers, Associate Editor on July 5, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

A couple weeks ago, I attended the U.S. launch event for the 2017 Fiat 124 Spider in San Diego. From the Edmunds office in Santa Monica, my hotel was a straight shot south on Highways 405 and 5. I decided to make the trip in the 2016 Tesla Model X for a couple reasons. I wanted to test the Tesla's Autopilot function on the highway as well as use a Supercharger station for the first time.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Using an EKM Meter to Track Power Consumption

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on May 25, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Electric cars are fundamentally different from gasoline ones on many levels, and fuel consumption tracking is no exception. Like many electric cars, our 2016 Tesla Model X has a set of dash readouts that summarize electricity consumption. They display the consumption rate in Watt-hours per mile (Wh/mile) and total usage for a given "tank" in kilowatt-hours (kWh).

Confused? The first is akin to mpg and the second is like gallons.

But there is a bigger problem. Both numbers are drawn from the point of view of the battery. That doesn't tell the entire story for electric cars because of something called charging losses. Imagine pumping 12 gallons at a filling station and spilling two of them on the ground in the process. The car only knows about the 10 gallons that made it into the tank, but your wallet knows about all 12 of them.

This is no clumsy accident when it comes to electric cars. It's another type of routine consumption that stems from the resistance in the long charging cord and the needs of the on-board battery temperature control systems that operate during the charging process. The only way to account for everything the car is using, charging losses and all, is to look at the meter on the pump. But many EV charge stations, including our Tesla HPWC (High Power Wall Connector), do not have the sort of meter found on every gas pump on the planet.

So we added one.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Supersized Supercharger Network

by Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing on April 29, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Tesla's Supercharger network has grown tremendously, and that means we have a lot more road trip options to explore with our 2016 Tesla Model X . The map above represents the state of the network in mid-June 2014 when Kurt and I undertook a massive LA-to-New York-to-LA cross-country round trip road trip, a feat we completed in less than a week.

Back then there were just 95 stations. You can guess which way we went just by looking at the map. Apart from our decision to chance a straighter path between Las Vegas and Utah, there was but a single cross-country option.

That map looks significantly more crowded today.

See full article and comment.


2016 Tesla Model X: Introduction

by Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor on April 11, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Electric vehicles are still rare, but improvements in range and desirability have raised their profile far beyond their actual sales numbers. Most of the electric vehicles (EVs) currently on the market are compact hatchbacks or sedans. Other than the short-lived Toyota RAV4 EV, electric SUVs have largely been absent.

The new 2016 Tesla Model X changes that. With seating for up to seven passengers and a larger cabin than the Model S sedan upon which it is largely based, the Model X is as close to a purpose-built electric SUV as the world has seen to date.

See full article and comment.



Leave a Comment
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Past Long-Term Road Tests