Full Charge Means No Regenerative Braking - 2016 Tesla Model X Long-Term Road Test

2016 Tesla Model X Long-Term Road Test

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2016 Tesla Model X: Full Charge Means No Regenerative Braking

by Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor on July 20, 2016

2016 Tesla Model X

Heading into a long weekend, I decided to give our long-term 2016 Tesla Model X a full charge rather than the usual 90 percent. Once on the road, the regenerative braking system was clearly feeling the effects.

I've gotten used to rarely touching the brakes in the Tesla, as simply taking your foot off the accelerator can bring you almost to a full stop. But I'd never driven the car with a full 250 miles of range showing. Within a block of leaving the office, I lifted off the throttle, expecting that distinctive parachute-like deceleration. Instead, the Model X coasted along like a regular car.

Thankfully, there weren't any cars in front of me and I wasn't driving very fast. Plus, muscle memory had me hovering over the brake pedal anyway.

After about 10 miles, the brake regeneration came back, and this all makes sense. If the battery is at capacity, it can't accept more juice, so the car effectively bypasses the regen system. Something to keep in mind for the next extended charge.

Mark Takahashi, Automotive Editor @ 6,410 miles

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests (1)
  • Comparison
  • Long-Term

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