Where The Trunk Is The Button? - 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata Convertible Long-Term Road Test

2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata Convertible Long-Term Road Test

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2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata: Where The Trunk Is The Button?

by Jonathan Elfalan, Road Test Editor on February 8, 2016

2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata

Walking up to your car with hands and arms full of stuff, it feels like a recurrent relay race against gravity as you struggle to gain access to the cabin. Your keys have sunk to the deepest reaches of your pocket or handbag (or man-bag), conspiring to break your resistance against placing your personal effects on the ground. Yes, this sounds ridiculous, but you've probably been here too.

For cars with keyless access, this scenario is a distant memory. If I'm driving any type of four-door, my preferred loading location is the driver-side rear passenger door. But for coupes or roadsters, like our 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata, it's the trunk.

With the aforementioned scenario playing out in some form recently, I circled around the back of the MX-5 in search of a trunk release button. Manufacturers place the trunk releases in various locations, and often try to make them as inconspicuous as possible. For example, Volkswagen likes to integrate the release into the rear emblem. Others have small buttons around the license-plate relief or hiding in plain sight in a taillight.

2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata

The MX-5's release was nowhere in sight. So I reluctantly unloaded some items into the driver's seat before fishing down into my pocket for the key fob to release the trunk. While doing so, I thought "What an oversight to have a keyless unlock button for the doors but not the trunk. There must be a button!"

So with fully unoccupied hands, I went back around to give the MX-5 a proper cavity search. Lo and behold, at about knee-level, a trunk button!

2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata

Due to the MX-5's shorter height, the taillights seemed like a more obvious location for a button. And even though this button is located lower than just about any other car I've come across, it remains easily accessible as long as you have a free finger to spare.   

Jonathan Elfalan, Road Test Editor @ 4,852 miles

 

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