Rock-Hard Headrests - 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata Convertible Long-Term Road Test
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2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata Convertible Long-Term Road Test

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2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata: Rock-Hard Headrests

by Cameron Rogers, Associate Editor on January 19, 2016

2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata

Bentley made waves last week when it announced that, like Mercedes-Benz before it, buyers will soon have the option to order their Flying Spur or Continental with a stone-trimmed interior. But while Bentley buyers will have to pay an obscene amount of money for their stone veneers, I found something just as rock-hard in our 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata.

And this car only costs $29,850.

If I didn't know that there were aggressive weight reduction targets for this new MX-5, I'd swear that the headrests were made from a slab of granite. There's a thin bit of cloth that covers the headrest, but there doesn't seem to be any cushion at all underneath. That wouldn't normally be a problem, but my head is butted up against the headrest for a variety of reasons.

It's mostly because the Miata's interior is exceptionally tight for my 6-foot, 4-inch frame. There's a delicate balance in finding a driving position that doesn't bury my head in the roof liner.

My optimal position in the MX-5 is moving the seat back until it is two notches from the end of the rail, then reclining the backrest as far as it will go. The non-adjustable headrest is angled forward, which makes it difficult to not lean my noggin against it.

The ride is appropriately busy, so my head constantly skips off the headrest, a headrest that feels like it has no padding whatsoever. From there, the choice is between further compromising my seating position and just dealing with the headache. Rather than bending my knees and potentially impeding steering wheel travel, I choose the head thumper.

Most of the other editors are shorter than me, so they can sit a little further forward and recline the seat a little more. Thus, their heads don't hit the headrest and it doesn't cause discomfort. Maybe I'm just not made to fit in this car, but there's no reason the headrest shouldn't have more padding for people who actually rest their head on it.

 

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests (2)
  • Comparison
  • Long-Term

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