Prefer Our Hyundai's Center Stack Design - 2015 Kia Sedona SX-L Long-Term Road Test

2015 Kia Sedona SX-L Long-Term Road Test

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2015 Kia Sedona: Prefer Our Hyundai's Center Stack Design

by Cameron Rogers, Associate Editor on October 29, 2015

2015 Kia Sedona

During the past ten months, we've heaped tons of praise on the 2015 Hyundai Sonata for its clean and simple center stack design. I'm a big fan as well. Our 2015 Kia Sedona has a similar split stack for climate and center display controls and while there are some differences, partially because of the third-row temperature dial, the design is still straightforward and easy to learn.

Still, I prefer the setup in the Sonata.

2015 Hyundai Sonata

The Sedona's most obvious difference is the lack of a temperature display screen. In its place are the front row temperature dials, a Climate button, a passenger airbag light and a button that triggers the hazard lights. This entire row is unnecessary, as the hazard button and airbag warning are better integrated on the Sonata. The Climate button simply pulls up a screen in the central display that shows the temperature throughout the cabin.

Personally, I'd prefer if this row was replaced by the Sonata's temperature screen. The Sedona's stack should be wide enough to incorporate a third readout for the temperature of the second and third row. On the plus side, I like that the Sedona's automatic climate control and front row temperature sync buttons are consolidated onto the dials, which frees up room for rear A/C controls. The absence of a fresh air button is also nice. Air is either recirculated or it isn't. No need for an extra button to differentiate the modes.

On the infotainment side, I am willing to give up a symmetrical design on both cars to move the map and navigation buttons closer to the driver and relocate the Uvo eServices button to the other side of the wide Seek/Track button. I simply don't use Uvo with any regularity and it shouldn't take up premium space near the driver.

The center console retains a similar look and feel to the one we love in the Sonata, but there's more wasted space here than in the Hyundai. It's still very easy to use, though, and I like it much more than the 2016 Honda Odyssey's dual-screen setup.

Cameron Rogers, Associate Editor

 

  • Full Review
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  • Long-Term

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