Used 2014 Jeep Compass SUV Review & Ratings | Edmunds
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Used 2014 Jeep Compass SUV Review

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2014 Jeep Compass SUV

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Summary

Edmunds Summary Review of the 2014 Jeep Compass SUV

  • C Edmunds Rating
  • Although this year's new six-speed automatic transmission improves the driving experience, the 2014 Jeep Compass still falls behind most other small crossovers in performance, fuel economy and overall refinement.

  • Pros

    Comfortable front seats; a few clever features; reasonably capable off-road when properly equipped.

  • Cons

    Sluggish acceleration; disappointing fuel economy; noisy, rough ride; tight rear legroom; minimal storage space.

  • What's New for 2014

    The 2014 Jeep Compass receives a newly optional six-speed automatic transmission that replaces the CVT in most models. There's also a minor styling update inside and out, along with a standard 6.5-inch touchscreen audio interface and a rearview camera for the Limited trim. Front-seat side airbags are now standard across the lineup.

Review

Compact crossovers have to cover a lot of ground. They need to be able to carry your mountain bike at a moment's notice. They need to offer enough all-terrain capability to get you to work during a snowstorm. They need to be roomy and comfortable for you and a couple of kids. They need to offer a semblance of style along with a decent number of tech features. Yet for all that, we're not willing to pay that much for them. The 2014 Jeep Compass is an example of a budget crossover that tries to check every box while keeping the bottom line low.

First off, it's a Jeep, and Jeeps are known for off-road supremacy. The Compass does have quite a bit more all-terrain capability than most other compact crossover SUVs, but that only comes about when you add some extra-cost features. And even if so equipped, it's a good bet you'll be calling your friend with a Wrangler to pull you out of a ditch if you attempt anything really challenging. And so like most other small crossovers, the Jeep Compass is mainly intended to give you enough traction and ground clearance to get to work after a snowstorm.

This year's new six-speed automatic transmission is a welcome replacement for last year's continuously variable transmission (CVT) on most versions of the Jeep Compass. When paired with the 2.4-liter engine, it improves both acceleration and fuel economy. That said, the 2014 Compass still feels rather slow in normal driving, and gas mileage remains below average with the new automatic transmission. Moreover, persistent engine drone and tire noise make for a noisy cabin, and the Jeep rides harshly over bumps and ruts.

With so many capable rivals in this class, it's certainly worthwhile to explore all your options. If enhanced off-road capabilities in a small crossover are a must-have, we'd suggest taking a look at the similarly priced 2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek. For the majority of crossover SUV owners who rarely, if ever, leave the pavement, the 2014 Ford Escape, 2014 Honda CR-V and 2014 Mazda CX-5 are some of the best choices in this class. If up-front cost is your main concern, the 2014 Nissan Rogue Select (the renamed old-generation version of the Rogue) has a low starting price like the 2014 Jeep Compass but it offers a much better overall package.

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

A five-passenger small crossover SUV, the 2014 Jeep Compass is available in three trim levels: Sport, Latitude and Limited.

Standard features for the Sport include 16-inch alloy wheels (17-inch wheels if optioned with the larger 2.4-liter engine), foglights, roof rails, air-conditioning, cruise control, 60/40 split-folding rear seats, a tilt-only steering wheel, a 115-volt household power outlet and a four-speaker sound system with a CD player and an auxiliary audio jack. The optional Power Value Group adds full power accessories, heated mirrors, keyless entry and additional body-color exterior pieces. The Altitude Edition package adds 18-inch alloy wheels, a body-color rear bumper, mesh cloth seat upholstery, and heated front seats.

The Latitude gets the above features as standard (with smaller 16-inch wheels for front-wheel-drive and 17s for all-wheel drive) and adds chrome exterior and interior trim, a height-adjustable driver seat, a fold-flat front passenger seat and a leather-wrapped steering wheel with audio controls. For the Latitude, the optional High Altitude Edition package adds 18-inch wheels, leather upholstery, a six-way power driver seat (plus manual lumbar adjustment) and a sunroof.

The range-topping Limited includes the High Altitude equipment along with different 18-inch wheels, automatic climate control, a driver information display, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a rearview camera, a 6.5-inch touchscreen display, and HD and satellite radio. The touchscreen interface is optional on the Latitude and includes an onboard hard drive with 28GB of digital music storage; on the Limited, this music server is combined with an optional navigation system.

The Freedom Drive II Off-Road group can be added to all four-wheel-drive trims. It includes 17-inch wheels with all-terrain tires, tow hooks, an off-road driving mode, an engine oil cooler, underbody skid plates, a full-size spare tire, hill-descent control, hill-start assist and a height-adjustable driver seat for the Sport trim.

The Latitude and Limited trims are eligible for the Security and Cargo Convenience group. On the Latitude this adds the auto-dimming rearview mirror, a security alarm and the driver information display. The Limited's version of this option group also includes remote start, a USB input and Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity. Jeep also offers Bluetooth, the USB port and satellite radio bundled as a separate option for all trim levels.

Also offered on the top trims is the Sun and Sound group (a sunroof, an upgraded nine-speaker Boston Acoustics sound system, two flip-down tailgate speakers and satellite radio for the Latitude trim) and the Trailer Tow Prep group (oil cooler, trailer tow wiring harness and full-size spare).

Powertrains and Performance

On the front-wheel-drive Sport and Latitude trim levels, the 2014 Jeep Compass is outfitted with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine that produces 158 horsepower and 141 pound-feet of torque. From here, three transmissions are available. A five-speed manual transmission is standard for the Sport, while a six-speed automatic or a CVT are optional. The Latitude has the six-speed automatic as standard. The CVT is a required option on Sport and Latitude models with the Altitude and High Altitude packages.

The EPA estimates fuel economy at 26 mpg combined (23 mpg city/30 mpg highway) for a front-wheel-drive Compass with the 2.0-liter engine and a five-speed manual. With the six-speed automatic, mileage falls to 24 mpg combined (21 mpg city/28 mpg highway), while the CVT version rates 24 mpg combined (22 mpg city/27 mpg highway).

Optional on the front-wheel-drive Sport and Latitude is a 2.4-liter four-cylinder that produces 172 hp and 165 lb-ft of torque. This engine is standard on all-wheel-drive models (which Jeep calls four-wheel drive) and all Compass Limited models.

Equipped with the 2.4-liter engine and the five-speed manual, the front-drive Compass is rated at 25 mpg combined (23 mpg city/28 mpg highway). Add the six-speed automatic and you're looking at 24 mpg combined (21 mpg city/28 mpg highway). With four-wheel drive and the 2.4-liter engine, the 2014 Compass is rated at 25 mpg combined (23 mpg city/28 mpg highway) with the manual and 23 combined (21/27) with the six-speed automatic.

The optional Freedom Drive II Group provides a more serious 4WD system with low-range gearing and hill-descent control, but requires that you also select the 2.4-liter engine and CVT. With the CVT, fuel economy is quite poor at 21 mpg combined (20 mpg city/23 mpg highway).

In Edmunds testing, an all-wheel-drive 2014 Jeep Compass with the 2.4-liter engine and six-speed automatic transmission went from zero to 60 mph in 9.4 seconds, which is an average time for this class.

Safety

Standard safety features for all 2014 Jeep Compass models include antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, front-seat side airbags and side curtain airbags. A rearview camera is included with the Limited trim and available on others. The Freedom Drive II Off-Road group adds hill-descent and hill-start control.

In Edmunds brake testing, the Compass came to a stop from 60 mph in 121 feet, which is average for this class of vehicle.

In government crash testing, the 2014 Jeep Compass received four out of a possible five stars for overall crash protection, with three stars for frontal crash protection and five stars for side crash protection.

Interior Design and Special Features

Jeep has upgraded the interior materials in the Compass for the 2014 model year, and this is especially noticeable in loaded Latitude and Limited models, which have attractive stitching and leather work. However, there are still plenty of hard plastic surfaces, and features like Bluetooth and a USB input, which come standard on most rivals, remain optional even on the upper trim levels.

Although the seatback cushions might be a little narrow for larger adults, the front seats are comfortable and offer adequate support for longer drives. The rear seat is also well cushioned, but legroom is tight for this class.

The Compass does sport some clever features, such as a cooled glovebox, a rechargeable LED cargo light that pops out for use as a flashlight, and optional speakers that flip down and out from the raised liftgate to enhance outdoor listening. At 62.7 cubic feet, the Compass' maximum cargo capacity is respectable. It's considerably more than the Subaru XV Crosstrek's 51.9 cubic feet and slightly less than the Escape's 66.3 cubes.

Driving Impressions

Regardless of which engine you choose, the Compass is not especially quick or invigorating to drive. Unquestionably, the new six-speed automatic transmission improves performance on models with the 2.4-liter engine. Even so, 2.4 versions of the 2014 Jeep Compass feel rather underpowered in normal driving in spite of a class-average 0-60-mph time. The engine makes its best power at higher revs, so the automatic transmission's frequent (and often slow) shifts can be bothersome when you're passing at highway speeds or merely trying to maintain speed on uphill grades. Equipping the Compass with the CVT results in downright sluggish acceleration and forces you to plan well ahead for passing maneuvers.

Making matters worse is a persistent drone from the 2.4-liter engine, regardless of the transmission. It escalates to a racket under hard acceleration, and combined with the Jeep's excessive wind and tire noise, you'll be reaching for the radio volume knob to drown it all out. Ride quality is another weak spot, as the Jeep's suspension struggles to cope with bumps and ruts, resulting in a harsh, bouncy ride over most pavement. This lack of composure also detracts from the crossover's handling abilities when you're going around turns.

Full Edmunds Expert Review: 2014 Jeep Compass SUV

What's New for 2014

The 2014 Jeep Compass receives a newly optional six-speed automatic transmission that replaces the CVT in most models. There's also a minor styling update inside and out, along with a standard 6.5-inch touchscreen audio interface and a rearview camera for the Limited trim. Front-seat side airbags are now standard across the lineup.

Introduction

Compact crossovers have to cover a lot of ground. They need to be able to carry your mountain bike at a moment's notice. They need to offer enough all-terrain capability to get you to work during a snowstorm. They need to be roomy and comfortable for you and a couple of kids. They need to offer a semblance of style along with a decent number of tech features. Yet for all that, we're not willing to pay that much for them. The 2014 Jeep Compass is an example of a budget crossover that tries to check every box while keeping the bottom line low.

First off, it's a Jeep, and Jeeps are known for off-road supremacy. The Compass does have quite a bit more all-terrain capability than most other compact crossover SUVs, but that only comes about when you add some extra-cost features. And even if so equipped, it's a good bet you'll be calling your friend with a Wrangler to pull you out of a ditch if you attempt anything really challenging. And so like most other small crossovers, the Jeep Compass is mainly intended to give you enough traction and ground clearance to get to work after a snowstorm.

This year's new six-speed automatic transmission is a welcome replacement for last year's continuously variable transmission (CVT) on most versions of the Jeep Compass. When paired with the 2.4-liter engine, it improves both acceleration and fuel economy. That said, the 2014 Compass still feels rather slow in normal driving, and gas mileage remains below average with the new automatic transmission. Moreover, persistent engine drone and tire noise make for a noisy cabin, and the Jeep rides harshly over bumps and ruts.

With so many capable rivals in this class, it's certainly worthwhile to explore all your options. If enhanced off-road capabilities in a small crossover are a must-have, we'd suggest taking a look at the similarly priced 2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek. For the majority of crossover SUV owners who rarely, if ever, leave the pavement, the 2014 Ford Escape, 2014 Honda CR-V and 2014 Mazda CX-5 are some of the best choices in this class. If up-front cost is your main concern, the 2014 Nissan Rogue Select (the renamed old-generation version of the Rogue) has a low starting price like the 2014 Jeep Compass but it offers a much better overall package.

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

A five-passenger small crossover SUV, the 2014 Jeep Compass is available in three trim levels: Sport, Latitude and Limited.

Standard features for the Sport include 16-inch alloy wheels (17-inch wheels if optioned with the larger 2.4-liter engine), foglights, roof rails, air-conditioning, cruise control, 60/40 split-folding rear seats, a tilt-only steering wheel, a 115-volt household power outlet and a four-speaker sound system with a CD player and an auxiliary audio jack. The optional Power Value Group adds full power accessories, heated mirrors, keyless entry and additional body-color exterior pieces. The Altitude Edition package adds 18-inch alloy wheels, a body-color rear bumper, mesh cloth seat upholstery, and heated front seats.

The Latitude gets the above features as standard (with smaller 16-inch wheels for front-wheel-drive and 17s for all-wheel drive) and adds chrome exterior and interior trim, a height-adjustable driver seat, a fold-flat front passenger seat and a leather-wrapped steering wheel with audio controls. For the Latitude, the optional High Altitude Edition package adds 18-inch wheels, leather upholstery, a six-way power driver seat (plus manual lumbar adjustment) and a sunroof.

The range-topping Limited includes the High Altitude equipment along with different 18-inch wheels, automatic climate control, a driver information display, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a rearview camera, a 6.5-inch touchscreen display, and HD and satellite radio. The touchscreen interface is optional on the Latitude and includes an onboard hard drive with 28GB of digital music storage; on the Limited, this music server is combined with an optional navigation system.

The Freedom Drive II Off-Road group can be added to all four-wheel-drive trims. It includes 17-inch wheels with all-terrain tires, tow hooks, an off-road driving mode, an engine oil cooler, underbody skid plates, a full-size spare tire, hill-descent control, hill-start assist and a height-adjustable driver seat for the Sport trim.

The Latitude and Limited trims are eligible for the Security and Cargo Convenience group. On the Latitude this adds the auto-dimming rearview mirror, a security alarm and the driver information display. The Limited's version of this option group also includes remote start, a USB input and Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity. Jeep also offers Bluetooth, the USB port and satellite radio bundled as a separate option for all trim levels.

Also offered on the top trims is the Sun and Sound group (a sunroof, an upgraded nine-speaker Boston Acoustics sound system, two flip-down tailgate speakers and satellite radio for the Latitude trim) and the Trailer Tow Prep group (oil cooler, trailer tow wiring harness and full-size spare).

Powertrains and Performance

On the front-wheel-drive Sport and Latitude trim levels, the 2014 Jeep Compass is outfitted with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine that produces 158 horsepower and 141 pound-feet of torque. From here, three transmissions are available. A five-speed manual transmission is standard for the Sport, while a six-speed automatic or a CVT are optional. The Latitude has the six-speed automatic as standard. The CVT is a required option on Sport and Latitude models with the Altitude and High Altitude packages.

The EPA estimates fuel economy at 26 mpg combined (23 mpg city/30 mpg highway) for a front-wheel-drive Compass with the 2.0-liter engine and a five-speed manual. With the six-speed automatic, mileage falls to 24 mpg combined (21 mpg city/28 mpg highway), while the CVT version rates 24 mpg combined (22 mpg city/27 mpg highway).

Optional on the front-wheel-drive Sport and Latitude is a 2.4-liter four-cylinder that produces 172 hp and 165 lb-ft of torque. This engine is standard on all-wheel-drive models (which Jeep calls four-wheel drive) and all Compass Limited models.

Equipped with the 2.4-liter engine and the five-speed manual, the front-drive Compass is rated at 25 mpg combined (23 mpg city/28 mpg highway). Add the six-speed automatic and you're looking at 24 mpg combined (21 mpg city/28 mpg highway). With four-wheel drive and the 2.4-liter engine, the 2014 Compass is rated at 25 mpg combined (23 mpg city/28 mpg highway) with the manual and 23 combined (21/27) with the six-speed automatic.

The optional Freedom Drive II Group provides a more serious 4WD system with low-range gearing and hill-descent control, but requires that you also select the 2.4-liter engine and CVT. With the CVT, fuel economy is quite poor at 21 mpg combined (20 mpg city/23 mpg highway).

In Edmunds testing, an all-wheel-drive 2014 Jeep Compass with the 2.4-liter engine and six-speed automatic transmission went from zero to 60 mph in 9.4 seconds, which is an average time for this class.

Safety

Standard safety features for all 2014 Jeep Compass models include antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, front-seat side airbags and side curtain airbags. A rearview camera is included with the Limited trim and available on others. The Freedom Drive II Off-Road group adds hill-descent and hill-start control.

In Edmunds brake testing, the Compass came to a stop from 60 mph in 121 feet, which is average for this class of vehicle.

In government crash testing, the 2014 Jeep Compass received four out of a possible five stars for overall crash protection, with three stars for frontal crash protection and five stars for side crash protection.

Interior Design and Special Features

Jeep has upgraded the interior materials in the Compass for the 2014 model year, and this is especially noticeable in loaded Latitude and Limited models, which have attractive stitching and leather work. However, there are still plenty of hard plastic surfaces, and features like Bluetooth and a USB input, which come standard on most rivals, remain optional even on the upper trim levels.

Although the seatback cushions might be a little narrow for larger adults, the front seats are comfortable and offer adequate support for longer drives. The rear seat is also well cushioned, but legroom is tight for this class.

The Compass does sport some clever features, such as a cooled glovebox, a rechargeable LED cargo light that pops out for use as a flashlight, and optional speakers that flip down and out from the raised liftgate to enhance outdoor listening. At 62.7 cubic feet, the Compass' maximum cargo capacity is respectable. It's considerably more than the Subaru XV Crosstrek's 51.9 cubic feet and slightly less than the Escape's 66.3 cubes.

Driving Impressions

Regardless of which engine you choose, the Compass is not especially quick or invigorating to drive. Unquestionably, the new six-speed automatic transmission improves performance on models with the 2.4-liter engine. Even so, 2.4 versions of the 2014 Jeep Compass feel rather underpowered in normal driving in spite of a class-average 0-60-mph time. The engine makes its best power at higher revs, so the automatic transmission's frequent (and often slow) shifts can be bothersome when you're passing at highway speeds or merely trying to maintain speed on uphill grades. Equipping the Compass with the CVT results in downright sluggish acceleration and forces you to plan well ahead for passing maneuvers.

Making matters worse is a persistent drone from the 2.4-liter engine, regardless of the transmission. It escalates to a racket under hard acceleration, and combined with the Jeep's excessive wind and tire noise, you'll be reaching for the radio volume knob to drown it all out. Ride quality is another weak spot, as the Jeep's suspension struggles to cope with bumps and ruts, resulting in a harsh, bouncy ride over most pavement. This lack of composure also detracts from the crossover's handling abilities when you're going around turns.

What Others Are Saying

Customer Reviews

Average Consumer Rating (See all 12 reviews) Write a Review


Jeep compass purchase (2014)

by on
Vehicle: 2014 Jeep Compass Sport 4dr SUV 4WD (2.4L 4cyl 5M)

I like the cloth seats but would prefer bench seats for these smaller vehicles. I put a key lock gas cap on and the MIL code on dash board lit up, also tried to put the old gas cap back on and still won't turn off, may be bad gas but mostly putting in the 87 blend and with the way gas prices are these days all cars should come with a key lock gas cap. The cruise control needs to be less complicated. I have the 2.4 engine with 4wd so if you are able to set cruise control before going up hills it's better. Would have preferred a 6 cylinder and a little more room to move inside.




Great adgility for around town .

by on
Vehicle: 2014 Jeep Compass Limited 4dr SUV 4WD (2.4L 4cyl 6A)

This vehicle was special order with upgraded engine , wheels , sound system and power sunroof.



2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Great car!!!

by on
Vehicle: 2014 Jeep Compass Sport 4dr SUV 4WD (2.4L 4cyl 5M)

Love my new car,this is my first SUV . I purchased the car in may of this yr. The car is awesome it fit my family well. No problems with anything. Thank you Paul Blanco is when purchased the car.




It's a love/hate relationship

by on
Vehicle: 2014 Jeep Compass Latitude 4dr SUV 4WD (2.4L 4cyl 6A)

First off: has been very very dependable without asking anything extra from me. Can't say that about all my relationships. Pricey with a few "frills" missing. Like no locking "glove box" Like no electronic plug-in in the rear seat area. Like no little blinkin' lights on the left and right rear view outside mirrors to warn people I'm changing lanes. Guess that's their problem, not mine. Safety issue: Driver's side windshield piler is so wide that is blocks view when making left hand turns. The frills that I LOVE are heated leather seats, rear view camera, nice to open the door and SLIDE right in (17 inch wheels!) and with the open sunroof interior slide open my hair looks gorgeous. Front drivers seat very comfortable. Haven't ridden in the passenger seat. Well, someone had to drive.



8 of 13 people found this review helpful

Excellent little 4x4 suv

by on
Vehicle: 2014 Jeep Compass Latitude 4dr SUV (2.0L 4cyl 6A)

Purchased my Compass in July this year. I wanted a Compass True North but Jeep does not build one, just for the auto shows. So I purchased my Compass 2.4, six speed auto,4x4. Using the spec's found for the True North, I built one. I added the two inch lift kit and added a performance intake. This is the best SUV I have ever had. I truly love driving the Compass. For those who complain that the engine is sluggish, a performance intake will fix the issue without effecting gas mileage. The lift kit is for better off-roading. No mountain climbing or forging rivers, just good off-roading fun.



4 of 9 people found this review helpful

Terrible car

by on
Vehicle: 2014 Jeep Compass Limited 4dr SUV (2.4L 4cyl 6A)

I just got the 2.4 automatic Compass Limited last week. It's a fleet vehicle, didn't have a choice so didn't test driver one. Picked up the car one evening, didn't do anything but drive home 5 miles. Woke up the next morning and the remote access buttons on the key did not work, used the key, got in, started the car and the radio wasn't working either. All kinds of similar issues. I'm sure that can be fixed but the biggest problem is the engine/powertrain. The vehicle does terrible when you try to accelerate to change lane or merge, pulls to the point of almost losing control. I drove a '12 Escape with a 2.5 engine, much more powerful engine.



Talk About The 2014 Compass

2014 Jeep Compass Discussions See all Started By

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Edmunds.com
10-21-2014
2014 Jeep Compass Among Chrysler Vehicles Recalled for Stall Risk | Edmunds.com...


Kirstie_H
Kirstie_H
01-28-2014
To discuss the latest lease details for the current model, please join us in the 2015 Jeep Compass Lease Questions forum....


stever
stever
01-16-2013
"With sales off 16 percent for 2012, the Compass gets the most attention in the form of a face-lift and mild interior upgrades, but both soft-roaders share the vital change: the switch from a con...



Gas Mileage

EPA-Rated MPG

  • 23
  • cty
/
  • 28
  • highway
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