Monthly Update for September 2017 - 2017 Infiniti QX30 Long-Term Road Test

2017 Infiniti QX30 Long-Term Road Test

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2017 Infiniti QX30: Monthly Update for September 2017

by Travis Langness, Automotive Editor

Where Did We Drive It?
Aside from a trip from one end of California to the other, our long-term 2017 Infiniti QX30 didn't see much action this month. Our typical commutes around town, combined with its one long highway stint, were enough to add over 1,500 miles in four weeks, though. As a result, it's ahead of schedule with more than 10,000 miles on the clock after just five months in the fleet. It seems popular enough to get signed out on a regular basis, but as we're nearing the halfway point of our test, a few complaints have started to crop up.

What Kind of Fuel Economy Did It Get?
We filled the tank in the QX30 six times during the month of September and ended up averaging 23.3 mpg over the month. That's 0.5 mpg lower than our lifetime average and right between the EPA's city and combined ratings. Here's how all the numbers break down.

Average lifetime mpg: 23.8
EPA mpg rating: 25 combined (21 city/30 highway)
Best fill mpg: 30.9
Best range: 411.7 miles
Current odometer: 10,018 miles

Maintenance and Upkeep
None.

Logbook Highlights
Performance
"The lack of available power in this QX is frustrating. Floor it when you're getting onto the freeway and it does OK, but the turbo-four really has to work in uphill passing situations. In town, the dual-clutch transmission and the slow-to-respond auto stop-start system are frustrating to deal with. It takes a good three-Mississippi to get the car going from a stop, and that's way too long if you're trying to make an unprotected left turn or merge into city traffic without cutting someone off. Turn off the auto stop-start and keep the car in Sport mode all the time; that's the way to go." — Travis Langness, automotive editor

"Annoying that this car defaults to Eco mode on startup. Because, really, Sport or Manual is the only way to drive this car. Of the two, I'll take Sport. You'll forget you switched it into Manual somewhere on the highway, slicing through traffic using the paddles. Then as you're turning through the first signal at the off-ramp, you're bouncing off the rev limiter because you can't get to the upshift paddle, which is now on the other side of the steering wheel. This feels like a lame concession to EPA testing standards and an even lamer restriction on the owner. If there's a setting to change it to driver preference, I couldn't find it." — Dan Frio, staff writer

2017 Infiniti QX30

Interior
"There's a really annoying creak coming from the driver's side rear door on the QX — in the city over bumps, on the highway when it's flat, or even when you take a corner at around 20 miles per hour. We need to get this checked the next time it goes in for a service; it's super annoying. If there's nothing to fix, I'm breaking out the Sawzall." — Travis Langness

"Not many cars make me feel claustrophobic. Actually, none that I can think of, except the QX30. I'm not a tall driver and I'm not sitting up high, but the roof is really low. It's like a Japanese capsule hotel. Sliding back the sunroof panel helps a bit since it visually opens up the cabin." — Dan Frio

2017 Infiniti QX30

Technology-Audio
"The Nissan-sourced 360-degree camera is a nice addition to our QX, but the low-resolution cameras make it feel cheap, especially inside a $47,010 car. This is the same camera system you can get on a Nissan Rogue, and it shows. It works well and feels classy in the Rogue, but in the QX it brings things down a notch." — Travis Langness

2017 Infiniti QX30

Utility
"We refer to the QX30 as a subcompact crossover SUV. What does that mean in the real world? Well, in the golfing world at least, it means you have to remove your driver in order to fit your bag in the trunk. I'm used to doing that when I'm driving small hatchbacks, but I'd hope a crossover would be a bit more accommodating. Think of this subcompact crossover as a little hatchback on stilts and you won't be far off." — Josh Sadlier, senior manager content strategy

Miscellaneous
"Most cars display a reasonably accurate distance-to-empty mileage. By the time you've drained the tank to within 40, 25, 15 miles, the trip computer usually lets you know so you can plan a stop, or roadside assistance call, appropriately. Not the QX30. All you get a little icon of the car's backside parked next to a pump. This is not helpful!" — Dan Frio

2017 Infiniti QX30

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