It Remembers!!! - 2011 Hyundai Equus Signature Long-Term Road Test

2011 Hyundai Equus Long-Term Road Test

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2011 Hyundai Equus Signature: It Remembers!!!

February 22, 2011

Equus Sport Button.JPG

I've discerned perhaps the most critical feature in our new long term 2011 Hyundai Equus Signature. It's not 0-60 time or the number of seat adjustments or cabin decibels at 70 mph.

No, this is a unique feature that could put every other luxury car maker out of business.

You see, the 2011 Hyundai Equus...remembers when you put it in Sport mode!!!

I seriously almost had an accident when I got in the car the morning after driving it home, pushed the start button, engaged drive, started on my way to work, and then saw the Sport light illuminated!

"Wait a second, I haven't engaged sport mode yet. I haven't hit that button since yesterday. Oh. My. God!"

It seems almost every luxury and/or performance car these days offers some form of adjustable driver settings, but very few remember those settings once you shut the car off. This is especially true if the setting is more aggressive (i.e. Sport).

For instance, I can't really drive our long-term 5 Series in the default setting, because throttle response is too, well, non-existent. Seriously, I don't consider the car drivable until I've engaged the Sport setting. And because it always defaults to non-Sport after shutting the car off I have to hit that button every time I start the 528.

I'm pretty sure most cars default to, for lack of a better term, "limp noodle mode" because it's part of the EPA certification process. Whatever engine setting the car starts in is what the EPA uses when determining fuel mileage ratings. Because the Sport mode on the Equus doesn't change throttle response (or fuel mileage) Hyundai can let the car stay in Sport mode at start up.

Even better, the default throttle settings in the Equus don't make the car feel like it's driving out of molasses whenever you apply the throttle from a dead stop. That means there's no need to put it in Sport mode to "fix" throttle response. However, if you put it in Sport mode to tighten the suspension and steering response it stays that way until you bring it out of Sport mode...forever!

As Tech Sgt. Chen said, "It's the simple things in life you treasure."

Are there other cars out there with a similar, "remembered" Sport setting? I'm sure there are but I can't immediately recall them. Help me out guys.

Karl Brauer, Edmunds.com Editor at Large

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