Used 2000 Honda Civic Si Review

Though a redesigned Civic comes out next year, excellent value has made the 2000 Honda Civic one of the most popular economy cars in America.




what's new

No styling, content or trim changes for the 2000 Honda Civic. The performance-oriented Si continues for 2000, and there have been paint comings and goings: Taffeta White has been added to the CX and DX Hatchback, and Dark Amethyst has been dropped; Titanium Metallic comes to the DX, LX and EX Sedan, and Vogue Silver is gone. Vintage Plum is now available to the LX and EX Sedan, and Inza Red has been eliminated.

vehicle overview

More than two decades ago, Honda introduced the Civic. It was a small, anonymous, unassuming car, competing in a market saturated by mammoth sedans sporting ornate chrome, garish styling treatments and acres of sheet metal. The producers of these defunct dinosaurs didn't bat an eye at Honda's fuel-sipping entry, despite the fuel crisis of 1973. Big mistake.

Since then, Americans have seen six generations of the Civic come and go, each much improved over the previous model, and each becoming immensely popular with consumers. 1996 brought us a new generation; certainly improved but not so much so that we'd consider it revolutionary. Available in hatchback, sedan and coupe body styles, Honda heeded customers who claimed the 1992-1995 Civic was too sporty-looking. A grille was tacked on up front, sheet metal contours provide a squarish profile, and larger rear taillamps give the Civic a more conservative look.

Dual airbags are part of the package, with antilock brakes standard on EX Sedan and Coupe models equipped with an automatic transmission. HX Coupes remain the only model to have available the continuously variable transmission, making it the most technologically interesting Civic offered.

Three different versions of a 1.6-liter, SOHC four-cylinder aluminum engine are available on the Civic. The most common variety has an output of 106 horsepower at 6,200 rpm. EX models get 127 VTEC-inspired horsepower at 6,600 rpm, and the HX Coupe uses an economical VTEC-E engine with 115 horsepower at 6,300 rpm. The Si Coupe sports a DOHC four-cylinder that makes 160 horsepower at 7,000 rpm.

The Civic has few shortcomings, aside from its anonymous personality. Hondas tend to be on the expensive end of the scale when new, but over time, they are a far better value than most of their contemporaries. The Civic is no exception to the rule. It is a car for people who don't enjoy repair-shop waiting rooms. It is a car that holds its resale value better than most of the cars it competes with. It is a car that easily endears itself to its owner.

The Civic is a solid buy. For those who like a bit of fun in their commute, try the Si version of the coupe. Want a fuel miser? The HX Coupe is your car, getting up to 44 mpg. Strict budgets demand a look at the CX, while sedans are aimed more at the creature-comfort side of the scale. Style-conscious buyers will go for the svelte coupe, or the suave EX Sedan. Whatever your needs, Honda offers a Civic that will meet them -- unless your needs include towing trailers or carrying a family of five.






edmunds expert review process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.