Path to Performance Continues With Short-Throw Shifter - 2015 Ford Mustang GT Long-Term Road Test

2015 Ford Mustang GT Long-Term Road Test

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2015 Ford Mustang GT: Path to Performance Continues With Short-Throw Shifter

by Carlos Lago, Road Test Editor on October 22, 2015

2015 Ford Mustang GT

The suspension isn't the only thing sitting lower on our 2015 Ford Mustang GT.

While it was up on the lift at Galpin Auto Sports getting the Track Handling pack installed, we also installed a short-shift kit from Ford Performance Racing Parts.

2015 Ford Mustang GT

Along with a new shift lever and knob, the Short Throw Shifter kit (part number M-7210-M8) includes a metal bushing and all the hardware needed for install, including a jam nut, reverse lockout ring, gasket, locking compounds, and grease. Ford claims a 15 percent reduction in throw, while the solid metal bushing means more precise shift action.

Ford once again provides easy-to-follow instructions on its web site (PDF).

Driveway mechanics, take note: This install takes some doing. Removing the shift assembly means lowering the transmission, which means removing the exhaust and driveshaft. We opted to do it during the suspension install, since the car would already be up in the air with its exhaust removed.

2015 Ford Mustang GT

Once the gearshift assembly is out of the car, the work is mostly simple disassembly, greasing, and reassembly.

2015 Ford Mustang GT

The inclusion of a reverse lockout ring means the shifter retains all stock shifting functions. You just have to be careful that it's oriented the correct direction, which is spelled out clearly in the instructions.

2015 Ford Mustang GT

These metal guys here will eliminate some of the isolation in the shifter, increasing vibration and noise in the process.

I feared the worst before the test drive, but was pleasantly surprised to find the shifter makes an improvement. The lever sits lower than the standard one, but the new shift knob is easy to wrap your hand around. The shifter requires higher effort to get into gear, but when combined with the short travel, makes gearshifts feel more precise. Shifting demands more wrist flex, but less arm movement.

The new metal bushings mean you feel some extra vibration when you rest your hand on the shifter. You'll also hear a small amount of gear whine if you drive with the windows up and the stereo off. Chances are you're okay with this if you're someone who wants a short-shift kit.

Whether this kit is worth it depends on how satisfied you are with the stock shifter and how inclined you are to do (or pay for) the install.

Carlos Lago, Road Test Editor

 

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